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Ladies: Before you leave the city...  RSS feed

 
gardener
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Ladies: Before you leave the city for your new homestead, invest in the most supportive bra you can find. Wear it only on days you will be on a tractor, mower, ATV, or bad bumpy road, to make it last as long as possible. I paid 5x my usual price for my good one, and it has been well worth the expense. I ended up moving a mower the other day when I didn't plan to and had just a normal bra on, hit where the mole has been excavating, and REALLY appreciated my good one, and REALLY wished I had it on.

You have more options in the city areas, the town we moved to has the smallest Walmart I have ever seen, or the second hand stores, that's it for where you can buy a bra. I'm really glad I had a lot of choices when I picked it, as I don't have them now. I do go to the bigger towns sometimes, but with all the running around that needs to be done when I'm there, having a day or three to seriously shop for a good bra just doesn't happen.
 
pollinator
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Location: Coastal British Columbia
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Oh Pearl, great topic! I wholeheartedly agree!

Where we are there are no clothing stores other than a Walmart 6 hours away!! So I have to plan my supply runs really well or get it shipped for a minimum of $25-50 in shipping alone. I never even thought about clothing and such before moving out here. When a person lives in the city, you totally take it for granted.

I've found that you need these items for a homestead:

- thick flannel shirts or really tough sweaters for those early morning chores
- good rubber boots
- lots of extra kids clothes (my kids get holes in their knees so fast from all the outdoor playing and working)
- extra kids shoes (sorry but I really like Crocs - I know someone is out there cringing...however Crocs wear out really fast)
- Carhardt or Dickie pants for everyone in the family
 
pollinator
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I dislike shopping, but of all the necessary items I hate shopping for, bras are the worst.  I hate going and trying on bras, often spending all day over many shops and still not finding any that fit all my requirements.  The result being that I wear bras until they fall to pieces, as I keep putting off shopping for new ones.

Last year I finally bought a Kwik Sew bra pattern and started making my own ones.  I scavenged the rings and closures from my old worn out bras to make the current ones:  waste not and all that.  My newest one is creamsicle orange, for when the black one with turquoise lace insert is in the wash :)

Although I'm not an expert sewist, I was able to follow the pattern quite easily;  for the three I've made, I broke it down into stages: cutting out the first day, sewing the main body the second, and finishing it on the third, taking up to an hour each day.

I can't say if this would also be a good option for ladies who need a lot of support, but for those like me with more modest chests, I would definitely recommend.  I look forward to the pleasurable future of bra making, instead of the torture of bra shopping.
 
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I understand everyone has different requirements but the only time I ever wear a bra is when I go to town never on my homestead. I find its much more comfortable without no matter what I'm doing and it comes off as soon as I'm in my car on my way home. Despite my limited use I agree it's hard to find a decent one, shopping for one is mostly disappointing and having a really good one is worth the extra cost.
 
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Jenn, I quite agree!
 
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Jenn Bertrand wrote:I understand everyone has different requirements but the only time I ever wear a bra is when I go to town never on my homestead. I find its much more comfortable without no matter what I'm doing and it comes off as soon as I'm in my car on my way home. Despite my limited use I agree it's hard to find a decent one, shopping for one is mostly disappointing and having a really good one is worth the extra cost.



Same here

My most comfortable one is from the thrift store and it's lasted me years as I also only wear to town and then only in the summer, otherwise I can layer up. I think it gets the most wear by slipping it off on the way home...stretching the straps and all...my guy is quite impressed by how quick I can remove.

What a tortuous piece of clothing to be constricted by and expected to wear by at least North American society.

On the other hand I don't operate bouncy equipment, or run, or jump rope...might have a different view if that were the case.  

 
Pearl Sutton
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I do operate bouncy equipment, and that $$ bra has been worth it's money many times over! My tractor doesn't think much about going over a 12 inch drop off, but I notice it pretty seriously.

I have meant to start this thread for a couple years, I kept forgetting. The mower vs the mole holes the other day reminded me again.  I used to not need bras, but illness has changed things, and these days I have to.

Those who can get away without one are in luck, the others need to think before they move where they can't shop for a good one.  Just one of those "who would have thought of it?!" things... I bought muck boots, and snow pants etc before I moved, but the bra was not an obvious need, it's not on most of the lists you see :)



 
Judith Browning
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I do operate bouncy equipment, and that $$ bra has been worth it's money many times over!



Got a brand, style to recommend?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Judith Browning wrote:

I do operate bouncy equipment, and that $$ bra has been worth it's money many times over!



Got a brand, style to recommend?


No, I don't know the brand on mine, or even the size (tag came off,) and it's just a matter of what will work on anyone. What works on me won't work on anyone not shaped like me. I have wide shoulders, require an underwire, and do best with shaped cups, and need underarm control, that's just me. That's not a bra I'd inflict on anyone who doesn't need those parameters. It's body armor, like my corsets.
 
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Location: San Vicente Creek watershed, California Coastal range, 2400ft
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Galadriel Freden wrote:I dislike shopping, but of all the necessary items I hate shopping for, bras are the worst.  I hate going and trying on bras, often spending all day over many shops and still not finding any that fit all my requirements.  The result being that I wear bras until they fall to pieces, as I keep putting off shopping for new ones.

Last year I finally bought a Kwik Sew bra pattern and started making my own ones.  I scavenged the rings and closures from my old worn out bras to make the current ones:  waste not and all that.  My newest one is creamsicle orange, for when the black one with turquoise lace insert is in the wash :)

Although I'm not an expert sewist, I was able to follow the pattern quite easily;  for the three I've made, I broke it down into stages: cutting out the first day, sewing the main body the second, and finishing it on the third, taking up to an hour each day.

I can't say if this would also be a good option for ladies who need a lot of support, but for those like me with more modest chests, I would definitely recommend.  I look forward to the pleasurable future of bra making, instead of the torture of bra shopping.




What type of fabric did you use ?  Special bra fabric or regular fabric ?
 
Galadriel Freden
pollinator
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Debi, I cut up some old t shirts to make my bras;  I also had a piece of turquoise stretch lace from an old scarf (it was a gift but I never wore it because it was too scratchy--works great on a bra as it doesn't actually touch my skin).  The pattern called for nylon and powernet and as I wasn't sure the stretchy cotton material would be sturdy enough, I used two thicknesses of it for the bra bands (instead of one thickness of powernet), and on two bras I interfaced with a lightweight linen (cut on the bias) in the lower cups.  The non-interfaced bra is more stretchy/less supportive, but also a bit more comfortable :)  

As I mentioned I'm not an expert, but I'm confident enough to jump in and mess about.  I found some helpful tips online about general bra construction before I bought the pattern.  
 
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