• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Ash Jackson
  • Kate Downham

Can you lease just 1 acre to start a small farm/garden?

 
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello!,

 I'm new here so bear with me haha. I have always been interested in gardening/farming but I don't really have a lot of space to do so in the property that I live in. I was wondering if it is possible to lease just 1 acre to start a small farm/garden. If so, what would the price range be? What tips should I know to start this? If this is possible at all, I would plan on having chickens and growing some vegetables (no clue what yet haha). I live in Ohio.

  Thanks,
     Adam
 
steward
Posts: 5274
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
1951
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Around here, land is often a burden to the people that claim to be it's owners. People are delighted if someone will take care of their place for them. No lease or rent payments required.

My farm is about 3 acres scattered across 7 fields in 4 communities. It could be much larger if I didn't turn down so many offers to care for people's land. The owners pay the property taxes, and the water bill. I grow fruits or vegetables, and might share some. I might also do some non-farming  care for the property like mowing/watering a lawn, pruning trees, or just watching over the place while the owner is away.

One of the property owners receives a huge property tax discount because I am farming the land, rather than having the county tax  it at residential rates. In such a scenario, you might consider asking the property owner to pay you to farm the land....

One of my farmer's market pals farms on a lot of small urban lots scattered around a neighborhood in the big city. She doesn't pay rent either, people just love the feeling of knowing that someone is taking care of their land, and growing something useful on it.





 
Adam Brian
Posts: 2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Joseph Lofthouse wrote:Around here, land is often a burden to the people that claim to be it's owners. People are delighted if someone will take care of their place for them. No lease or rent payments required.

My farm is about 3 acres scattered across 7 fields in 4 communities. It could be much larger if I didn't turn down so many offers to care for people's land. The owners pay the property taxes, and the water bill. I grow fruits or vegetables, and might share some. I might also do some non-farming  care for the property like mowing/watering a lawn, pruning trees, or just watching over the place while the owner is away.

One of the property owners receives a huge property tax discount because I am farming the land, rather than having the county tax  it at residential rates. In such a scenario, you might consider asking the property owner to pay you to farm the land....

One of my farmer's market pals farms on a lot of small urban lots scattered around a neighborhood in the big city. She doesn't pay rent either, people just love the feeling of knowing that someone is taking care of their land, and growing something useful on it.







Thanks for the info! How did you find the land? Should I post an ad in the newspaper or something similar or is there another method that is better to use? Thanks again.
 
pollinator
Posts: 11799
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1042
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
First try posting an ad here at permies!  https://permies.com/f/27/land-share
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
Posts: 5274
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
1951
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I got my first field because I saw a note in the post office for "horse pasture for rent". The rest of my fields people came to me and asked me to farm their place. I paid rent on the first field for a few years. $400 for an acre for a year. Which was way overpaying. The average rent in this area is closer to $60 to $100 per acre per year.

If you see an orchard that hasn't been pruned in years, or fruit trees where the fruit is falling on the ground, stop and talk to the owners. They might be thrilled if someone took care of their place. If you see a place that was previously a garden, but that is going to weeds this year, that's a great place to strike up a conversation with the current tenants.

 
Posts: 307
Location: Stone Garden Farm Richfield Twp., Ohio
24
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The Small Farm Plan By Booker T. Whatley | MOTHER EARTH NEWS
https://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/small-farm-plan-zmaz82mjzkin
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 11799
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1042
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think there's almost no endeavor more important these days than small farming.  Diversified small farms are much more productive per land unit than large commodity ones, and can be more resilient to weather extremes.
 
gardener
Posts: 967
Location: Ohio, USA
187
dog forest garden fish fungi trees urban food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi! I live in Ohio too! I also worked with and work as a small farmer. Farming is awesome, but as for money, it takes a while to build up enough to do anything, and I wouldn't rely on it for income for atleast 5 years, and one acre is probably a good start, but long term I think five acres is minimum...but starting with 0.25 acres is not a bad way to go because there's a learning curve and getting set up and through that curve takes time and energy. Also, many farms have a secondary "agrotourism" or educational aspect.

If you are close to Cleveland there's many small farmers who are willing to show you what they have going on.
 
gardener & hugelmaster
Posts: 1958
Location: mountains of Tennessee
766
cattle hugelkultur cat dog trees hunting chicken bee homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Try Craigslist. I stumbled across an ad a few days ago asking for someone to plant & care for their large garden. Looked to be 2 or 3,000 square feet. It was already tilled & manured. Apparently it was an older couple who just wanted to share.
gift
 
Rocket Mass Heater Manual
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic