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Uses for old firehose?

 
Posts: 21
Location: Southern Vermont, Zone 5a
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I was just gifted a roll of used firehose.  Looking for suggestions and creativity - what would you do with it?

Cheers!
K

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pollinator
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Location: New Brunswick, Canada
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I've used them at a gym, with the middle around a post, pumping the ends with your hands like a rope.  It's a great workout for your arms.  A local gym might buy it off you, but I'm sure better suggestions will be along shortly.
 
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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We used it to pad the places where the cattle panels meet on our hoop house.  I used strips of rag to tie it on so there was nothing rough against the greenhouse plastic cover.  

It is tough to cut and I think we found that tin snips worked the best, cutting through the fold on one side and opening it out flat to use.
After checking, I see that we cut down both folds and used just the webbing on the flat joins and for the corners we cut only one side and left the rubber lining.

I think it might last a long long time even out in the weather year round.  Ours is only  on it's second summer though.

 
gardener
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They could be used as a hinge. Similar to how people use an old glove as a hinge.

A tree ring? Bury it in a circle about an inch deep. Keeps water by the trunk of a small tree.

Tow strap?

Use like a chain for a swing or tire swing. Or hanging from a tree next to a swimming hole. Ladder rungs into a tree house?  Lots ot kids play uses......
 
pollinator
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Wranglerstar recommends making tool sheaths out of them - he might even have a video of it on YouTube.
 
gardener
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We used to run chains through them and then hang them at the back of horse stalls, wash stalls, trailers, etc to keep the horses in (without them getting all cut up). Works also for cattle and I would imagine goats.

If it holds water you could close off ends, fill them, and use them as weights for ground cover or other things that need to stay put on windy days (i'm looking at cardboard in my garden over newly buried trenches full of bokashi rot).
 
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Location: Campton, New Hampshire
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Dustin Rhodes wrote:Wranglerstar recommends making tool sheaths out of them - he might even have a video of it on YouTube.



We also use our old hoses to make sheaths for the files and rasps necessary for maintaining said tools. 1" Hose is just the right size for that purpose, but what you have will do. If that's 3" fire hose it makes a pretty decent bar cover for chainsaws.
 
pollinator
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Our local zoo uses that stuff for climbing structures in the gorilla enclosures :)
 
master steward
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We have something that looks very much like a firehose.  It is called a "Snatch em strap".

Similar to what Wayne said "tow strap".  It is use some what like a come along.  When someone is stuck in mud, you use it to pull them out, thus the name "Snatch em"
 
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Possibly use it as a soaker hose - elevated off the ground so it doesn't rot. It looks like heavy duty canvas, so they tend to drip once saturated.

Good if it's hot weather, you're going away for a few days, and you want plants to survive.

Also, in a wicking bed to draw moisture up into the soil.
 
pollinator
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This is a bit different suggestion, but the fire troop I learned to spin poi from used to use the kevlar from fire hoses to make wicks for their fire dance equipment.
 
Timothy Markus
pollinator
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Michael Cox wrote:Our local zoo uses that stuff for climbing structures in the gorilla enclosures :)



I totally agree with Michael, you should get a gorilla!
 
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Newbie here . Could make  like a rope  swing out of it if you have kids .
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