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Recommendations of where to buy land?  RSS feed

 
Tristan Fitzpatrick
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where should i buy land/ I need private secluded woodland so i can build a weird little home and just chill out.
Been living in Los Angeles for 10 years, cant take it anymore. Please help me. i keep finding cheap land in nevada on ebay, but it looks like a cold desert, no place to grow. but i dont know what im talking about.
Please give me some hints as to where around i should look. I am looking to keep my investment under 25,000 buckers
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9740
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Personally if I were looking, I would try the Missouri Ozarks. Land seems affordable and it is a good growing climate. Some danger from tornadoes but you'll have natural disaster wherever you go. I prefer tornadoes to earthquakes, having been through both.

 
Walter Jeffries
Posts: 1091
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
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What I did was draw circles of inclusion and exclusion on the map after narrowing it down to a region. Factors of my markets, family, activities, etc. Then I looked at the towns that fell in the lapping areas and checked out their zoning, regulations, etc. Don't buy some where you will have to fight to build.
 
Fred Morgan
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Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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I am originally from the Ozarks, it is a very nice place to live in my opinion.

If you built your into the hill like some are suggesting, the danger from tornadoes become less of an issue. Reduction of heating / cooling costs and safety from tornadoes, seems like a pretty good idea.
 
Tristan Fitzpatrick
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I like these opinions. However to narrow it down a little bit further, i would like to be around like minded people, not people who are going to be bummed that i am building into the hill. you know with neighbors who are planning on clearing there land and building a monstrosity of cabin on their property. you know they arent going to like me very much. hhaha

Where is a good unregulated zone for building??

 
Jason parmer
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What about Kentucky? I think you can do darn near anything you like there as long as you ain't growing pot or running a still.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Appalachia and the Ozarks both offer reasonable property prices (and property taxes). In most parts of those 2 regions, once you get outside of city limits, codes and rules/regulations seem to vanish.
 
Hanley Kale-Grinder
Posts: 112
Location: Mountain West of USA, Salt Lake City
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nor cal or pacific north west
 
Christian McMahon
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I want to run a still for ethanol. I want to grow hemp for 50 thousand products it makes. Where do I move? Canada?
 
                            
Posts: 126
Location: Ava, Mo, USA, Earth
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Do a needs analysis to figure out what you really want and then start narrowing it down. Being able to build a funky house and having privacy can be had in almost every region of the USA, not to mention outside of the USA. What's more important to you: climate, good soil, people, cost of living, etc?

When I made my list, about 15 years ago, it included cheap land, low taxes, no building codes, some winter but not a lot and many other things. That's what lead me to the Ozarks and I've been happy here and will never move willingly.
 
Tristan Fitzpatrick
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What state is better in your opinion Arkansas, or the missouri zarks!
 
Mark Anderson
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Location: North Olympic peninsula, WA state.
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My grandmother has a large ranch in the Missouri Ozarks about 40 miles south of Springfield; growing up I visited many times in all seasons. Spring is nice, and Fall too... but the summers are hell. There are poisonous snakes like copperheads, water moccasins, rattlers.. there are millions of hungry ticks that carry diseases, the chiggers will drive you insane with itching, the mosquitos can drain you dry in minutes and also carry diseases, rabies is still a problem there; one old woman I met had a rabid fox come up behind and bite her leg, they have lots of tornados, there are many places where if you take a wrong turn and end up near someone's meth lab they will shoot first or release pit bulls, the first thing people ask when they meet you is what church you are in, these folks think the planet is only 6,000 years old and that evolution is a made up story. If you're a right wing religious conservative, then you will probably like it. There are a few ecovillage communities such as Dancing Rabit which is in the northeast plains area of the state and East Wind which is in the Ozarks near the Arkansas border. I would recommend going to East Wind and staying for a while to see if you really want to live in a climate that's like being in a sauna 24/7. I'm in the Pacific Northwest which has a mild maritime climate perfect for gardening and there are many areas where you can find inexpensive property... as long as you get far enough away from the Seattle metro area; my biggest problem with this climate are the cold wet dark winters. Mason county on the southeast side of the Olympic Peninsula has lots of woodland acreage for sell, they have fewer restrictions too. I knew a lady who built a hidden strawbale cottage in the woods without permits, she put an r.v. space near the road for the county to see and built her home gorilla style, back in the woods. Bellingham has a thriving alternative lifestyle community and they really support each other. I live on an island in the Puget Sound now, but will be looking to buy a few acres later on where I can build my own off grid, non-permitted, small, earth bermed geodesic dome home. Most people I know who are from the west coast can't handle the Ozarks because of cultural differences and the climate, most of my relatives who have left the Ozarks and moved to the west coast may have nostalgia for MO but would rather not move back, ever. Check the Windemere real estate site, they have an interactive map and a good search program which allows you to zero in on what you want, you can also save your searches if you register to the site and it's all free of charge.
 
Tristan Fitzpatrick
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nice this message just stopped me from buying 9 acres. I cant have my dog running around with copperheads everywhere. Well as much as I would like to learn from people just the sound of "dancing Rabbit" or "east Wind" sorta makes me worried about the possibility of being molested by a third level wizard. I think i may have to look a little closer thank for this.
 
Fred Morgan
steward
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Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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One thing I think is very important - because where ever you move, there you are - often the biggest hurdle on being happy somewhere is you. If you tend to be happy where ever you live, you will probably be okay most places. But, if you tend to not be that way, then you might want to stay in a culture you like or fits you well.

I have seen lots and lots of people move to Costa Rica thinking it would be wonderful, and within two years, often less, going back home, poorer, but often, not wiser. Costa Rica is a developing country, don't come here expecting something like the USA. And the people speak funny too (as in Spanish) and think differently too. (passive aggressive is an art form down here) You adapt, or you go nuts.

I know most of the people around me probably think things I don't agree with, like witchcraft believe it or not. Many of them have no more than a sixth grade education too. They definitely think I am weird. In some ways it is easier here, since people assume I am weird because I am a foreigner - not because I am just weird.

When going somewhere "completely different" one of the best things you can do is rent for a while and see if you like the community, the area, etc. Or do a rent with an option to buy. Yes, I know Gringos (I am one) want to put shovel in the ground immediately, but you could be throwing away all your work too, if you find a neighbor doesn't want you to have chickens, for example.

just my dos colones (which are worth 1/5 as much as 2 cents...)

And those who have left Costa Rica has some of the weirdest ideas of what it is really like.
 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 395
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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Mark Anderson wrote:My grandmother has a large ranch in the Missouri Ozarks about 40 miles south of Springfield; growing up I visited many times in all seasons. Spring is nice, and Fall too... but the summers are hell. There are poisonous snakes like copperheads, water moccasins, rattlers.. there are millions of hungry ticks that carry diseases, the chiggers will drive you insane with itching, the mosquitos can drain you dry in minutes and also carry diseases, rabies is still a problem there; one old woman I met had a rabid fox come up behind and bite her leg, they have lots of tornados, there are many places where if you take a wrong turn and end up near someone's meth lab they will shoot first or release pit bulls, the first thing people ask when they meet you is what church you are in, these folks think the planet is only 6,000 years old and that evolution is a made up story. If you're a right wing religious conservative, then you will probably like it. There are a few ecovillage communities such as Dancing Rabit which is in the northeast plains area of the state and East Wind which is in the Ozarks near the Arkansas border. I would recommend going to East Wind and staying for a while to see if you really want to live in a climate that's like being in a sauna 24/7. I'm in the Pacific Northwest which has a mild maritime climate perfect for gardening and there are many areas where you can find inexpensive property... as long as you get far enough away from the Seattle metro area; my biggest problem with this climate are the cold wet dark winters. Mason county on the southeast side of the Olympic Peninsula has lots of woodland acreage for sell, they have fewer restrictions too. I knew a lady who built a hidden strawbale cottage in the woods without permits, she put an r.v. space near the road for the county to see and built her home gorilla style, back in the woods. Bellingham has a thriving alternative lifestyle community and they really support each other. I live on an island in the Puget Sound now, but will be looking to buy a few acres later on where I can build my own off grid, non-permitted, small, earth bermed geodesic dome home. Most people I know who are from the west coast can't handle the Ozarks because of cultural differences and the climate, most of my relatives who have left the Ozarks and moved to the west coast may have nostalgia for MO but would rather not move back, ever. Check the Windemere real estate site, they have an interactive map and a good search program which allows you to zero in on what you want, you can also save your searches if you register to the site and it's all free of charge.


I came to this website accidentally -- looking for someone (or couple) who might be interested in homesteading a portion of our land free in exchange for helping us with things around the place. (Kind of a hired hand sort of thing, only not so intense.) I saw this post and began reading to see what sort of places people were recommending, only to come across this quote by Mark Anderson.

I have to say that I am sort of offended by being painted with such a broad brush. I am from the Missouri Ozarks -- as are most of my family back to the late 1600s. While a lot of what Mark says here is true -- there are a lot of ticks and chiggers for example, and the summers are definitely hot and humid (though I wouldn't call them hell, exactly) -- a lot more of this diatribe is simply unfair. The natural history stuff is basically true, if somewhat exaggerated, and I admit that there are meth labs and hillbillies in abundance, but there are also a lot of hardworking and sensible folks here who have nothing to do with any of that. Most people around here still don't bother to lock their doors at night. Some of us even have more than a 5th grade education, believe it or not. We are also not ALL Bible-thumping conservatives. We, (my husband and I) for example, are vegetarian, atheist, environmentalist liberals, card-carrying members of PETA, Greenpeace, NRDC and so on. (We supported Dennis Kucinich for president!) While we do have pit bulls (4 of them), we also have 7 other dogs -- all rescues from puppy mills and abusive situations; and 4 cats. We also have chickens and goats as pets, and love them all dearly. None of them ever gets turned loose on anybody. If they did, you might get licked to death. We even do bat rescue.

Yes, there are copperheads all over, but there have NEVER been any deaths associated with a copperhead bite in the state of Missouri. The rattlesnakes are, unfortunately, rare and becoming rarer because people still do not understand that they are a valuable part of a healthy ecosystem and kill them unfairly. Water mocassins -- while tough customers -- only inhabit the wetter areas. You can easily find a place away from a lake or river to live if snakes scare you unduly. I might also remind you that there are few states in this country without venomous snakes of some kind. We have many beautiful non-venomous snakes as well, and they far outnumber the venomous ones. (Besides, copperhead bites really aren't all that bad. We have had 4 cases of snakebite in our dogs -- who stupidly put their noses in the snake's face. The worst thing that happened was that two of them got mildly sick for a couple of days and had some localized swelling. We carry Benadryl in a fanny pack when we walk them in the woods. Give an immediate dose and the dog will hardly notice the bite. That does not apply to an extremely tiny dog like a chihuahua, of course, OR in the case of a really humongous snake. However copperheads rarely reach more than 30 inches.) I don't even know any person who has ever been bitten and I have lived here (off and on) most of my life. I'm also pretty sure that rabies is no worse here than in other states with abundant wildlife. Missouri is very lucky to have a lot of wildlife and beautiful, clear streams and diverse habitat -- forests, glades, prairies, cave life, riverine systems and lots of lakes. We have an incredible diversity of both flora and fauna (I should know -- I am a naturalist.)

As for building into a hill. One of the really nice things about country living here is that no one really cares what you build. If you own at least 5 acres outside the city limits there are NO zoning laws and you can build anything you like. Taxes are low too. My husband and I have been building or experimenting with one thing after another for over 20 years and finally settled on a hybrid timberframe/strawbale/tire earthship-style home with a living roof. Try doing that in any city anywhere else!

Land runs from $500 to $2000 per/acre for most of this area. The more remote and rugged the cheaper it is. The high end is usually only for outstanding farm land -- in other words, acreage with actual soil. (Most of the Ozarks grows rocks best. However, if you want to build with stone, that is a definite plus!) We own 75 acres of mixed savannah, glades and woodlands. We abut Mark Twain National Forest near Hercules Glade Wilderness, so we have the run of the forest as well. It is truly a little slice of heaven. We have a disappearing stream (wet weather creek with lots of semi-permanent pools in the creek bed and springs and seeps everywhere). The water quality is great here and you can drink straight from the well in most places. (Ours is 445 feet deep -- clear, cold and delicious.)

Anyway, my point is, there is a lot to be said FOR this area in addition to what has been said AGAINST. Every place has good and bad points and it is really not fair to list only the bad points. I notice there was no mention of the mildness of our winters (usually). Or the fact that we are in the perfect zone for growing almost anything you can name that traditionally grows in either southern or northern climates. (Like high and low bush blueberries. Or grapes -- did you know Missouri has an outstanding wine industry?)

Well, I could go on, but I think I made my point. If you would like to know more about this area, please contact me. I would be happy to send photos or research local real estate listings.
 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 395
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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Oh, I almost forgot... Yes we do have a lot of tornadoes, but that is why we also mostly all have root cellars in the country. You can find a work around for a tornado -- not so for earthquakes and volcanic eruptions like you get in the pacific NW. Domes work well too.
 
Fred Morgan
steward
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Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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My family had 600 acres in the Ozarks, I can't recall a single snake bite in any of the stories I have heard, and they had more than 100 workers who worked in the fields. There were a few places we weren't allowed to go, as seven year olds, because of the snakes, but that is only because the grass was never cut, etc.

And we had dogs too.

Heck, I consider where I live safe, but I live within 30 miles of an active volcano on one side, and another that seems to be waking up, about 30 miles way on the other. But with active volcanoes, comes great soil, and hot springs.

Besides, there is active and there is explosive eruption. I would prefer active for decades over Mt St Helen types.

There is in truth, no place 100% safe. You choose your risks. The horses I ride are probably the most dangerous thing I do.
 
Mark Anderson
Posts: 35
Location: North Olympic peninsula, WA state.
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Okay, I'm apologizing for what I wrote about the Missouri Ozarks... as Deb pointed out I was being unfair by mentioning mostly negative things about the area. I have many fond memories of working on my granddad's ranch, picking rocks out of pastures, feeding the angus bulls and charlet cows, storing hay etc... The Ozarks are very beautiful in the Spring with lots of wildflowers, summers are hot and humid... but after a hard day bucking hay bales Granddad brought us delicious cool watermelon from the Roy store or the spring house, and home made root beer. My favorite season was fall, the fall colors are really awesome there... we used to drive down a road called Glade Top Trail, the leaf colors and land forms are incredible. Walking through piles of crispy colorful leaves exploring the woods... wonderful. I personally saw just one copperhead, but saw many water moccasins one even swam up to me in a swimming hole. Most of the people are hard working and have decent educations. My granddad was a drunk until age 40 when he became diabetic... with a sixth grade education he buckled down, worked hard, and was worth over a million dollars in land (1500 acres), houses, and equipment before he died in 1984. My family also has a long history there dating back thousands of years, caucasion family showed up in the late 1700's, though some of the mountain men were there sooner. I have many relatives in the Ozarks. When I was a kid the worst things were the chiggers and ticks, oh and the wild hogs that chased me once. I used to catch the snakes then let them go where I found them. I hear they have tarantulas and armadillos there now and coyotes have displaced foxes in many areas. In all fairness there is a lot to love about the Ozarks, I have great memories from living there and know that if I wanted to go back my grandmother would give me land and a house to homestead. My dad was from Brandsville Missouri, mom was from Ava Missouri, he was in the Navy and I grew up all over the country... Texas, Missouri, Florida, California, Washington state, of all the places I have lived and traveled... Washington state has everything I'm most drawn to. Heading from west to east... a big sandy Pacific coast, the Olympic mountains (not volcanic) with mount Olympus, glaciers, giant evergreen trees, deep lakes, then you have the inland sea of Puget Sound with thousands of islands (I love to go camping out of my sea kayak), then Seattle and a long north to south stretch of lowlands with great farming. After the lowlands you get right into another set of big mountains, the Cascade range with more snow capped peaks some of which are volcanic (I was at Stehekin in the mountains 100 miles north, when Mt. Saint Helens erupted), after those mountains the land is high desert with the mighty Columbia river gorge, (the best wine grape growing and apples in the world) then a huge plateau covered with wheat farms, finally the land starts getting hilly and mountainous again... the Palouse area is so beautiful you feel like you're in farmer's heaven. This one state has more kinds of geography than anywhere else I've ever been, there are areas that look just like Missouri and the midwest, areas that are like Texas, and even areas that are like Florida ( The Hoh Rainforest... just not as hot). My home town has had many Hollywood movies filmed here... "Cry for the Stranger", "Officer and a Gentleman," "War of the Roses," and "Practical Magic," to name a few. If you would like to see what Coupeville looks like watch "Practical Magic." Gee wiz, now this sounds like a tourist promotion... guess I just wanted to say why I choose to live here in poverty when I could have free land on grandmother's ranch in the Ozarks. Google the "Foxfire Institute" for info on the best set of books ever written about how to homestead, make do, and handcraft, you will be amazed at the inginuity and wit of those old timers in the Ozarks. One thing I argue with my relatives in Missouri about is the definition of what makes a mountain, to me the Ozarks are just hills and small plateaus but they all insist on calling them mountains and I tell them to come see the Cascades or the Olympics. Once again, my apologies for the rant about Missouri... I should not have let some bad memories influence what I wrote, it really is a beautiful place, and I do recommend staying in a community there before deciding on a move.
 
John Polk
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In reality, most snakes are more afraid of humans than we are of them. If you make plenty of noise while walking through 'snake country' you won't surprise them, and chances are you will never see one...they will slither away long before you can get close enough to threaten them.

A small flock of guinea fowl will happily get rid of the ticks for you.
 
Mark Anderson
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Location: North Olympic peninsula, WA state.
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Oh, Deb... root cellars are great, but losing your home is not. Grandmother lost a huge hay barn a few years ago, it was within yards of my aunt's home and not far from grandma's. That's why I like dome homes so much, they have gone through hurricanes and tornados with little or no damage. Check out Monolithic Domes in Italy Texas their domes are fire proof, bug proof, tornado proof, earth quake proof, and they are certified by the Red Cross as disaster safe shelter. Yes they look strange, but I don't understand why folks keep building stick frame houses in tornado or hurricane areas.
 
Mark Anderson
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Location: North Olympic peninsula, WA state.
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Yes, most snakes are more afraid of us... except them darn cotton mouths who like to investigate anyone diving in their swimmin holes, also they lay across the trail where the sun comes through to the ground and sometimes they wont move and you have to go around them... if you see them in the first place. I respectfully went around a half dozen of those scaly sunbathers one time. Watch your step on trails around watery areas.
 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 395
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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You are a gem, Mr. Mark Anderson! Apology accepted and applauded. You make it sound better than I could, and I love my little homestead. Now that we are all being friendly, I must admit that one of the things I dislike most about this area (I live near a tiny speck called Cedarcreek - east of Branson) is the lack of people to have intelligent, enlightened conversation with. That is one of the main reasons I encourage people from other places to come here. We could definitely use a bit of cultural diversity! The landscape; the history; the sheer beauty and natural diversity is wonderful. I even appreciate that the cost of living is very low, compared to most of the country (though wages match unfortunately). But... I do miss talking to like-minded individuals. Well, I can do that here.

The thing is... and this is my little secret, but I will let you in on it... I have actually always wanted to live in the Pacific Northwest. I love this place, (as long as I can be here on my own little homestead) but a long time ago I decided that I would be happier there. I love the lush forests (all those giant trees, ferns and fungi call to me like you wouldn't believe); the call of the ocean (I think I was a sailor in an earlier life) and the people -- so diverse and accepting. You have what I want, Mark. The only reason I haven't gone there is that I haven't been able to afford it. I want to buy enough land near the sea and in the wilder areas that I don't have to see or hear the neighbors. That costs BIG $$$ in that part of the country. So, I make do with this place. (Well, if I am being strictly honest, having a husband who doesn't care about moving, and a lot of animals who need me figures in too. When my animals die of old age, I may ditch the husband and go anyway! )

Don't get me wrong. I really do love this place and I would miss it a lot, but something in the NW really calls to me. Its funny how that works isn't it?
 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 395
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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Oh, forgot to mention. I have the entire Foxfire series. Love those books!
 
Mark Anderson
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Location: North Olympic peninsula, WA state.
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If you are looking for land near the ocean in the pacific northwest, most of it is very high priced, many places 1 acre near the beach will run more than $100K, but there are places within a short drive of the ocean where you can find acreage closer to $2000 per acre; usually you have to get at least ten acres at that price. I've found parcels that have no power or water nearby which were around $20K for ten acres, for me that would be okay because I want to live off the grid. If I had a way to make a living in one of those areas I would buy a place on the Olympic Peninsula, the drier side not the area around Forks (Twilight movies) where they get 365 inches of rain per year. On the north and east flanks of the Olympics there are microclimates where it's much drier... about 15-17 inches of rain per year. In Missouri there is good affordable land most anywhere as long as you are far enough away from Springfield and other metro areas, also land near Branson does seem to be higher priced because of all the famous people who have bought places in the area.
 
Tristan Fitzpatrick
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Deb Stephens wrote:Oh, I almost forgot... Yes we do have a lot of tornadoes, but that is why we also mostly all have root cellars in the country. You can find a work around for a tornado -- not so for earthquakes and volcanic eruptions like you get in the pacific NW. Domes work well too.


Whats a root cellar??
 
Mark Anderson
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Location: North Olympic peninsula, WA state.
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A root cellar, or at least the type they usually build in tornado country, is like a concrete bunker in the side of a hill, underground, or in the basement of a house. If you have seen The Wizard of Oz movie, the place where the family hides underground when the tornado comes through. I think it's called a root cellar because they put root vegetables in there to keep them fresh and edible until the next growing season.
 
Tristan Fitzpatrick
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Well I am A beach boy. But i cant surf in Washington properly anyways so I am willing to give up my beloved surfing to be alone in nature?

It seems the ozarks is the place to go simply due to the highly affordable big acerage lots im seein bordering forest land.

Someone pick for me dammit.

 
Mark Anderson
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Location: North Olympic peninsula, WA state.
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Oh, Tristan, since this is your thread; I have seen land for sale in Arizona that was pretty cheap... the best climate there seems to be higher up around 4-6000 foot elevation.
 
Mark Anderson
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Location: North Olympic peninsula, WA state.
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Well, I must admit that if you want affordable land you can't hardly beat the Ozarks for beauty and climate. There is also cheap land in Arkansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee.. places where people have abandoned the land and moved to cities for jobs. Just be aware of this scam: they will sell you some cheap land that sounds perfect, you get there and what you have is acreage behind a farmer's property with no access at all. They hope you will give up and go away, losing the money you put down on the property. This dosen't happen as much as it used to, just be aware that in some of those places anyone who is a stranger, is also fair game to the locals who can sometimes be very clannish and tribal. Loyalties are on a county basis, if you aint from Douglas county, or Hazard county etc... you are not trusted, and some folks don't have any problem with cheating you out of your cash of property. This attitude is not as dominant as it used to be, but it's still out there. Sorry Deb, this is a sore spot for me... my family lost 40 good creek bottom acres because of this scam. As far as Washington land, eastern WA has some land that's probably just as inexpensive as that in the Ozarks, it just depends on where you look.
 
Tristan Fitzpatrick
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What about the chiggers! how bad is that going to be trying to farm land with that goin on>

T
 
Mark Anderson
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Location: North Olympic peninsula, WA state.
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The chiggers mostly hang out in grassy pastures, try to avoid going off the trail or road when passing through tall grass. On grass that has been cropped short the chiggers can't get on you very easily. There are some insect repellents that work too; chiggers are related to spiders, many repellents which work on other bugs wont work on them. If you get chiggers, apply oil to smother them. My granddad used to wash with kerosine to get rid of them, one time a cigar smoking friend of his walked into the barn while granddad was washing with kerosine... I heard some firery language and the cigar came flying out the barn door.
 
Lolly Knowles
Posts: 159
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If you don't mind winter, with snow and temperatures that occasionally drop below zero, this part of the Mid-West is worth looking at. My property is about 100 miles north of Indianapolis in an area of rolling hills and running water, with a highway within 5 miles in any direction. The small towns were set up at one days travel apart, back when travel was a horse (or ox) pulled contrivance. Larger communities are within an hour travel by standard gasoline engine.

I know that there are several places for sale by owner ranging from a house and a couple of acres to hundreds of acres of "tillable" ground. price per acre will depend on the amenities already available, but $2K an acre doesn't sound unreasonable for a multi-acre plot of unimproved land.
 
Paul Abbott
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Lots of cheap and remote land in southern central oregon. For example http://www.landwatch.com/Klamath-County-Oregon-Land-for-sale/pid/144014757

 
maikeru sumi-e
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Don't be scared of snakes. We have rattlers where I am. Give 'em respect and distance.
 
Fred Morgan
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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You just have to adjust to the local culture...

"Rattlers, them good eating!"
 
Deb Stephens
Posts: 395
Location: SW Missouri, Zone 7a
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Tristan,
A root cellar is just a shelter that does double duty as a place to store food from your harvest and get it through the winter. It doesn't have to be just roots. Lots of people store hard fruits, like apples and other vegetables like winter squashes and so forth in there too. I've even seen some more elaborate 2 or 3 room shelters that include areas for canning jars and even meat lockers. I've also seen versions that were little more than a hole in the ground lined with chicken wire to keep the critters out, then padded with straw and covered over with metal sheets or old windows. Those work fine for potatoes, carrots or turnips when you don't have a huge garden or a lot of indoor storage space.

The biggest problem with having a root cellar in the Ozarks is that we don't have a lot of soil to dig one in except in low areas around rivers and lakes and up around the upper part of Missouri. It's mostly limestone on the western side below the Missouri River, and tends to granite over along the Mississippi on the eastern side. (Granite is pretty much all you see from about halfway down the eastern side to the bootheel and then over toward the center along the bottom of the state. That is the area of the New Madrid fault -- the one area in the midwest that gets the BIG earthquakes like out in California. Anyway, back to root cellars... Most folks build a sturdy shelter by digging down as far as possible (maybe 2 to 4 feet tops); building the room in the hole and then berming or covering it up with the dirt from the excavation. It makes a mound. With a door set into it on one side for access, you're all set. The best way to build it would be to put a small ferro-cement dome in the hole and cover that up. Domes are very strong anyway, but with all the steel and cement over it, you'll have a bomb shelter as well as protection from high winds.

About chiggers. They itch like hell, but otherwise are not as bad as everyone seems to think. Most people who live here just get used to itching because there isn't a lot you can do about them except never go out. If you are one of those people who just has to use something, I have found that Avon's Skin-so-Soft bath oil works better than anything more toxic and repels mosquitoes too. However, the best way to avoid chiggers is to learn not to lounge around in the grass. You can always tell a non-Ozarker because he will be the one sprawled flat on the nice green grass with his hands cushioning his head gazing at clouds. Locals will be standing or sitting on a big rock -- even if they just hiked a long way to get to that pretty grassy spot. And guess who is going to be itching all night?

Ticks are worse, and you can get diseases from them -- Lyme disease, Rocky M. Spotted Fever, Erlichiosis... to name a few. Not much you can do about those either except try not to brush foliage along paths (they hang out there waiting to be brushed and picked up by passing deer and other animals). In your yard, keep grass short and get chickens. They love to eat ticks and you will never find them in a yard with free-ranging fowl, I promise. Ticks also hate hot areas, so when hiking, you are usually pretty safe in glades and open areas. Avoid deep leaf litter around trees like the plague! If you stand still for more than a few seconds in a place like that you will have them crawling up your legs. The "seed ticks" (baby ticks no bigger than the period here .) are the worst because they cluster together by the hundreds and will wipe off a leaf or tall grass onto you as you pass. My strategy, besides avoiding them to start with, is to carry along a few folds of duct tape. As soon as they get on you -- before they get a chance to spread out, just press a piece of duct tape over them and rub it down and pull off. You can also use the leaves from wild quinine (a common glade plant here) to brush them off. It works great because its kind of like sandpaper only with short stiff hairs all over it. It really grabs them. Just odn't panic if you get a tick. You aren't going to come down with some horrible disease instantly. It take up to a couple of days for them to transfer disease to the host (if they are even carrying it to start with -- most are not). If you always do a thorough tick check when you come back from a walk, and make sure to use a lot of soap when you bathe after a long hike (it kills them), you will be fine. I've lived with them my whole life and I give them little thought (except to register how annoying they can be) anymore.

On snakes... educate yourself about them. Knowing what makes a snake a snake is the key to not getting bitten. Learn where they like to hang out -- rock piles, wood piles, stretched out along the backside of a log across a path (never step over a log without looking and never stick your hand blindly into a rock crevice or wood pile). Learn when they hang out where they do. Sunny rocks on cool days and in the early hours of the morning -- to warm up. Shady holes and rock/wood piles during the hottest part of the day and in summer. Also understand that they are more active at night when its hot and more likely to be out during the day when it is cool (spring and autumn. They winter in dens -- caves usually, around here.) Understand that they are not hell-bent on biting anyone or anything bigger than they can eat. It would be self-defeating since that venom takes awhile to build up in their system and is essential to their hunting success. They want to save it for a rat or rabbit, not waste it biting something too big to swallow! They also don't want to be stepped on (it hurts!). If you watch for them and walk around giving them plenty of space, they will be very happy to leave you alone as well. The possible exception to this is the water moccassin. For some reason, they tend to be a tad belligerent -- especially on hot days when they can also be very agile and fast. I have even had them chase me a time or two! Best to give them a very wide berth. But, as I said previously, you really only need to watch for them in persistently wet areas like along rivers and lakes -- especially over in the bootheel area where there are swamps. You really don't see them otherwise.

As for land scammers... Mark, you know cons are everywhere. There is no corner on that market here in the Ozarks. Besides, it really would be an irresponsible buyer who neglected to get a platte map and see the paperwork on easements, or do a title search before plunking down money. Would you buy a car without looking under the hood to see if the engine was still there?!

Tristan, the area in Missouri or Arkansas you choose depends upon what you want. If you want to farm in a big way, I'd suggest looking north of the Missouri River, or down in the bootheel, or over toward Kansas. If you plan to just enjoy nature, hike and maybe do a bit of home gardening, the SW MO/ NW AR area is great. You can deepen and improve your soil with compost or use raised beds for a small garden, or if you want to work with what you have, grow grapes -- this rocky soil is great for those. The area around Willow Springs and east of Ava is generally flatter and more open than the SW corner or the eastern area around St. Francois County. Land is more tillable there (around Willow Springs/Ava) because the soil is a bit deeper, but in my opinion it is not as pretty as the hill country. You may have heard of the Little House on the Prairie series of books? The author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, lived in Ava -- her house is there and has been made into a museum. That should give you some idea of what that part of the state looks like. We have Karst topography over here in the corner -- meaning we have lots of caves and sinkholes. If you enjoy caving, you may want to check this area out.

By the way, people are a bit clannish around here, but that is changing as more people come into the are from other places. In smaller towns, it may take you 10 or 15 years to start being treated like a local (almost) but nearer to the larger cities, no one will give it a second thought. Its kind of funny, but it seems like almost everyone I meet these days over near Branson is either from California or Nevada. For some reason, a lot of folks from those states find Missouri appealing. Land prices out west are so high, I figure that must be it. Who knows?

Well, I've talked enough for now. Any more questions, just shoot. I will be happy to share what I know or look up what I don't.



 
Mark Anderson
Posts: 35
Location: North Olympic peninsula, WA state.
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Oops, guess I did it again. My mouth knows my shoe size; I wasn't trying to single out the Ozarks in connection with land scams, because you are definitly right, they happen everywhere. My dad bought the property sight unseen on someone's word that it had good road access, someone he knew near the town where he grew up. Wish I didn't have such love/hate memories of the area, my aunt and grandmother keep begging me to come back and take charge of what's left of granddad's ranch operation.. that would be fine with me if I wanted to live back there, it is lovely. I remember the summer smells... the leafy resinous fall smell... there was some weed or herb that had this wonderful aroma. In the spring there are these frogs that make a funny giggling sound, then there are the big ol' bullfrogs around the ponds and I even liked it when the cicadas came out.

Deb, it sounds like you know a lot about ecology; it really comes through in your writing, I'm certain you must be a great benefit to your community.

Tristan, I'm moving on to another thread... I hope you find a place that is just right for you; like others have said on here it's not so much where you go, it's more about what you do when you get there. If you are involved with the local community and show that you feel at home they will usually accept you for who you are... even if they think of you as a little odd and different. Maybe it's more about choosing the community than it is about the land. Deb is a great resource for information about the Ozarks, I think she would be a great person to have in your corner.
 
Raven Sutherland
Posts: 164
Location: MAINE
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25 K won't go to far....

in any Case it's always better to go there | Visit |
and feel it.....out
 
Pamela Honey
Posts: 9
Location: Northern California
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Christian McMahon wrote:I want to run a still for ethanol. I want to grow hemp for 50 thousand products it makes. Where do I move? Canada?

I suggest Mendocino, California check it out, very progressive.. pot/hemp is legal there... I live just south of there and it's beautiful and close to the Redwood national forest
 
Pamela Honey
Posts: 9
Location: Northern California
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Funny I'm born and raised Northern Californian and just made my first property purchase! In Dent County Missouri! 9.64 acres bordering Mark Twain NF!
Was in Missouri last summer visiting family and camped out at Meramec State Park http://mostateparks.com/park/meramec-state-park and even with the humidity and the bugs (that kept aiming for my eyes) oh and the overnight "storm" really just ALOT of rain that sent a river through our tent and "flash" flooded the road out of the park... not that it bothered us we were happy to just stay put... even with all that it was the most amazing place, everyone we met was so friendly, big rigs even made room for us on the freeway! that doesn't happen here! I call California "the hurrry up and wait state" no joke!

Excited to be moving to beautiful Missouri!
 
A day job? In an office? My worst nightmare! Comfort me tiny ad!
Roots Demystified by Robert Kourik
https://permies.com/wiki/39095/digital-market/digital-market/Roots-Demystified-Robert-Kourik
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