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I need cuttings! (or seeds)

 
pollinator
Posts: 618
Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA - Zone 6b
155
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I cannot afford trees rooted in buckets as I had planned to use for my food forest.

I'm looking for many small cuttings of the following trees:

Apples
Black Arkansas
Northern Spy
assorted cider and eating apples

Peaches
freestone preferred

Cherries
black
yellow
bing
Japanese Double Bloom

Prickly Ash
American or Chinese

Nuts
Hardy Giant Pecan

Locust
thornless honey locust

I am going to order trifoliate oranges in the spring, but some stuff came up that has set me back a bit in funds. The electric bill is twice as high as expected and I have to put up caulk and film in the windows, seal up the bottom of the house etc... This has set back my pasture fencing and food forest planting in both budget and time.

Thus, I appeal to the community, if you have the trees listed above, and are willing to ship me fresh cuttings that I can root myself, I will find a way to pay you back.

 
pollinator
Posts: 11802
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1051
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I have the shrub form of Prickly Ash, Zanthoxylum hirsutum.
 
steward
Posts: 8849
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I don't have a single one of those varieties (that I know of), but have you considered growing them from seed?  You might be able to get 50 seeds from someone easier than one cutting and they're easier to ship.  Just a thought...
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
Posts: 618
Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA - Zone 6b
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Mike Jay wrote:I don't have a single one of those varieties (that I know of), but have you considered growing them from seed?  You might be able to get 50 seeds from someone easier than one cutting and they're easier to ship.  Just a thought...



That is an excellent point.
 
pollinator
Posts: 463
Location: Utah
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If you decide to go the seed route, look around you for old groves. Actually, do that for cuttings as well. Plants that have grown in your environment for a long period of time will be more likely to have offspring that survives under your conditions. If you're planting in sand, look for trees growing in sand. Clay, likewise. Look for older trees that bear fruit you like.

In my experience, sweet cherry seeds will germinate but seem to have some interesting genetic problems, from seedlings that don't use chlorophyll (died, of course) to those that don't have seed leaves or stay all curled up and try to grow that way. Etc. I think cherries are seriously inbred.

Apple seeds germinate easily and have a great deal of genetic diversity. But if both parents are good, likely the fruit will be good as well. Peaches likewise. If both parents are good, likely their descendants will be good. Peaches take about four to five years from seed to fruit.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 11802
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1051
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Here is a good source of seeds:  https://sheffields.com/
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
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Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA - Zone 6b
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Problem solved. I have the seeds
 
pollinator
Posts: 1159
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Blackberries, raspberries, and strawberries added to the mix will give you a lot production while you wait on the trees to mature.
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Apples are difficult to grow organically. I would  still plant them, but you might consider some low maintenance trees like persimmon and mulberry.

Montmorency cherries are very low maintenance here. Not sure about sweet cherries.
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
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Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA - Zone 6b
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Ken W Wilson wrote:Blackberries, raspberries, and strawberries added to the mix will give you a lot production while you wait on the trees to mature.



I'm getting a collection of several kinds of strawberries from Johnny's Selected Seeds to have a harvest period of May to September. Strawberries are my favorite berry, and I make Strawberry Balsamic Jam every year.

We do plan to get bush berries as well, we have selected blueberries, raspberries, and lingonberries.
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