Win a copy of The Prairie Homestead Cookbook this week in the Cooking Forum forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • James Freyr
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
  • Dave Burton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Steve Thorn
  • Eric Hanson

Collecting Self Heal/All Heal (prunella vulgaris) seeds to spread as a living mulch and groundcover

 
gardener
Posts: 1069
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
341
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I found some Self Heal/All Heal (prunella vulgaris) growing wild here around some of my blueberry plants.

This plant can be a great low growing perennial ground cover around fruit trees or berry bushes that can also be used for other purposes as well!

It likes moist soil and has been growing for me in a mostly sunny area.

The seeds are really easy to collect from the dried seed heads and transfer to the spot you want them to grow.

Here's a video of the plant growing native in my yard.



Anybody else have this growing wild near them?
 
pollinator
Posts: 204
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
33
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for this video, Steve. I was just thinking of getting some of this going myself, so your video is timely.

 
Posts: 7140
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1132
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That's a good one!

We had a lot of clumps of it growing at our old place and would cut at flowering to dry for infusions.  Subtle taste and mixed nicely with other medicinals as a tonic.

It's another on my list that I forgot to gather seeds or dig some when we moved.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/s/selfhe40.html  

 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 1069
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
341
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Diane Kistner wrote:Thanks for this video, Steve. I was just thinking of getting some of this going myself, so your video is timely.



Yeah Diane, I was really excited to finding it growing here.

It seems like it is content growing right amongst other plants, which could maximize space and fill in the gaps to minimize other unintended plants from growing.
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 1069
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
341
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Judith Browning wrote:That's a good one!

We had a lot of clumps of it growing at our old place and would cut at flowering to dry for infusions.  Subtle taste and mixed nicely with other medicinals as a tonic.

It's another on my list that I forgot to gather seeds or dig some when we moved.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/s/selfhe40.html



I'll have to try the infusion Judith. : ) Do you mix it with honey to sweeten it like it mentioned in the link, or do you just mix it with other medicinals?
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 7140
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1132
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Steve Thorn wrote:

Judith Browning wrote:That's a good one!

We had a lot of clumps of it growing at our old place and would cut at flowering to dry for infusions.  Subtle taste and mixed nicely with other medicinals as a tonic.

It's another on my list that I forgot to gather seeds or dig some when we moved.

https://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/s/selfhe40.html



I'll have to try the infusion Judith. : ) Do you mix it with honey to sweeten it like it mentioned in the link, or do you just mix it with other medicinals?



I hardly ever sweeten tea or infusions unless it's something like ashwaganda or a really bitter herb, and then I do only use local raw honey.
The self heal is such a mild subtle flavor that is fine unsweetened even with other herbs.
I used to add a little of it to almost what ever herb I was brewing at the time...passionflower, skullcap, anise hyssop, mint, etc.  I don't think it is a strong medicinal but nice.  

This is reminding me of our crazy 'lawn' at our other place...between us we had so many things marked to 'save' that it was like an obstacle course to mow...and we tried to keep it mowed around the house because of ticks and copperheads.....
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 1069
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
341
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm the same about saving plants like that. The Self Heal was coming up in an area of my lawn, and I've just let it go wild to preserve it!


 
The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers: http://richsoil.com/cards
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!