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What died in your new gardens? so far...

 
pollinator
Posts: 142
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
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Not quite. But my black beauty elderberry is dying. Some smaller branches have been wilting in the last few weeks. I cut them off, didn't find any borer. Now one of the four bigger braches is following the path.

My other black lace elderberry is fine. They are both patent plants and propagation is not allowed, as said on the label. Does that mean I can't even take a cutting to save the plant?
 
gardener & author
Posts: 1956
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Tereza Okava wrote:The plants seem healthy, I'm in a region that is known for growing broccoli and cauliflower (conventionally, of course), what am I doing wrong that I'm getting small heads?



https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/broccoli/buttoning-broccoli-heads.htm

Primarily, buttoning of broccoli occurs in young plants when they are exposed to several days of cold temperatures of around 35-50 degrees F. (1-10 C). Cold temperatures are not the only reason for poor broccoli heads, however. Broccoli plants are sensitive to any prolonged changes in their environment. A number of conditions can affect the plant, resulting in a change of vegetative growth early in the plants’ development. Additional stressors such as insufficient water, a lack of nitrogen, excessive salt in the soil, pests or disease and even weed competition may all contribute to broccoli buttoning problems. Transplants are more likely to button than young rapidly growing plants, as are plants whose roots are exposed. The good news is that the problem of a broccoli that forms small or no heads can be solved.

 
gardener
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Location: South of Capricorn
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ooh, thanks Rebecca. I did a search and saw that and laughed. Our winter temps are totally all over the place (24C to 0C, often in the same day), as are rain/drought cycles.
The producers here use high tunnels, which probably buffers the temp shifts (and here I just thought it was bugs).
 
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everything died this year complete total failure, peaches and cherries frozen off in late spring freeze. power company contractors came though spraying herbicides and my new this year garden spot that was under power lines. I won't even walk through that part of property anymore I'm so disgusted. got another couple spots for next years garden picked out and keeping them mowed so weeds won't go to seed and I'll plow it up after leaves fall. hopefully will start on a few raised beds in another spot close to the well after I get cut firewood off it
 
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Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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May Lotito wrote:

My other black lace elderberry is fine. They are both patent plants and propagation is not allowed, as said on the label. Does that mean I can't even take a cutting to save the plant?

There's the "rule of the law" and the "spirit of the law". You paid for one plant. If you took cuttings and made multiple plants, to me that would go against both the letter and the spirit. If you asked them to replace the plant and they agreed, that would be in keeping with the spirit of the law. If you took cuttings and kept a single replacement plant, to me that would not only be within the spirit of the law, it would also save the company money and the environment the cost of shipping you a new one. I have never bought such a plant, so the exact words that meet the "rule of the law" are unknown to me. If I were to buy such a plant, I would make sure I kept the receipt!
 
May Lotito
pollinator
Posts: 142
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
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Not just about money. I grew this plant from 4" starter for 3 years and it started blooming this spring. Without this one, the other blacklace elderberry won't bear fruits. I guess it is soil fungal infection. I am going to get a compost tea application and see if that will stop the progress.

I understand the hard work of plant breeder need to be acknowledged and protected. The thing is there seems to be less and less choice of heirloom plants in the stores. Majority of plants sold in Lowe's are propagation prohibited if you read the labels carefully. Fine with perennials but for annuals, that's lots of money to buy them very year. I bought most of my plants from walmart: no brand, no label, cheap and robust. and I can propagate as many as I need. Or I just do wildflowers.
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