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What died in your new gardens? so far...

 
Posts: 51
Location: West Palm Beach, FL
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Not much has died yet, but I've been focusing on perennials.  I planted a bed of swiss chard a little too late in the season and it can't handle the heat.  Not dead yet, but struggling.  All the perennial greens are thriving though.. I just had some longevity spinach on a burger last night.
Thought an air-layered guava I propagated had died because it lost all it's leaves, but it's coming back.  Also I almost killed some carambola seedlings due to overwatering.
I just finished planting a polyculture in one of my raised beds this morning - turmeric, peanuts, and bush beans in alternating rows.  I'm excited to see how it does.
I've never been able to grow peppers very well, hot or sweet.  A couple small plants have died for unknown reasons.  Still trying though.

My gardens are mostly perennial, and more than half of the raised beds are empty right now, but I plan on growing a few summer crops - sweet potatoes, turmeric, eggplant, okra, peppers (with shade cloth), sunflowers, tobacco, tulsi, and cotton, just for fun.  Ok that's more than a few crops.  
I'll report back after more casualties occur
 
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Mike Barkley wrote:There is some kind of tiny insect here that destroys almost every eggplant I try to grow. Tried to trick them with a different variety this year but no joy. Transplanted the seedlings just a week ago. Bugs have already found them. Not quite dead yet but almost. Sigh.



Thanks for this, Mike. I have that insect too. It seemed impossible but it just kept happening. The plant starts disappeared, new seeds disappeared. My sow bugs ate so many seeds of so many things, I lost track, so I credited the eggplanticide to them too. I also had a phenomenon I've never seen where something broke the stems of nearly all my healthy pepper and tomato starts halfway down and just deposited the lovely leafed tops next to the now naked stems so I could see what it had done. This happened one night after the next and it was so fast, I had no time to think about a solution.

Finally, moles are tunneling like mad and I think they may have stunted a blueberry bush I planted last year. Does anyone have a sense of what moles actually do to the root system besides depriving it of dirt (which I assume is certain death, in any case)?

What I do know is that my home compost, which makes up most of my beds now that I'm two years into this garden, caused an explosive population of sow bugs in early spring. There were so many I worried nothing would grow. Some stuff did come up, so I feel grateful for that and I am hoping the explosion of rollies is part of the succession of creatures as the ecosystem changes and that by next year something will balance them out. Has anyone else has that happen? I'd be grateful to know how it evolved for you.

 
gardener
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These tomatoes are dying.
It seems to only be the bigger ones,  so I'm hoping it's just to much wind.
I'm going to move them, stake them and hope for the best.
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pollinator
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This guy:

 
Posts: 24
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Michael Moreken wrote:I have to keep in mind effects of having black walnut on three sides of property for ~next five years.



Fortunately, I have black walnut only on one side of my property; the trees are on neighbor's land.  I'd harvest the nuts, but I'm allergic.  I have had decent success grown pole beans in beds in close proximity to the trees.  Have you tried or have you had any success with any of the "juglone resistant" veggies?  I also tried squash, supposedly resistant, but it didn't even sprout.

Susan
 
Susan Mené
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I am in the northeast, and my area has been cloudy, cool alternating with hot, and rainy. Nothing is dead yet, but most of my beets, chard, carrots and squash are growing at shockingly slow rates.  Pole beans thriving. The more I learn, the more I understand that weather will have its way with plants, come what may.
 
Posts: 400
Location: Roseburg, Oregon
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My entire flower I was planting for bee forage next year... destroyed by feral pigs guess one of the neighbors thought it was a good idea to turn them loose!
 
gardener & bricolagier
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I'm in the Midwest flooding territory, this area isn't underwater, but within 100 miles is, and all of the lakes are overfull. That's my excuse :D

My confession: I just planted zucchini and yellow squash for the THIRD TIME. How do you even KILL a zucchini!?!

Most of stuff looks like the last planting may have taken, there have been 4 rounds of plantings so far, and at least some of it is working.
Round 1: My starts that I did in seed trays almost all died (some kind of damp off I think.)  (5% survival rate, all red bell peppers.)
Round 2: I bought transplants other people had done (some lame varieties, unlike what I had started) most of them didn't make it, a few of them did.
Round 3: Seeds of a lot of things, maybe 5-10% survival rate.
Round 4: Reseeded (not always the same varieties, was out of some types) looks like 60% survival rate.

This is pathetic. I have gardened for over 30 years.
How do you kill zucchini!?!  I always went for the planting style of "throw zucchini seeds at the ground, run before it grabs you with it's tendrils like Little Shop of Horrors."
How do you have ONE beet come up? And NO Swiss chard?! Chard ranks with zucchini in my world for amok. Had to replant beans twice.
This is pathetic!
:D
 
gardener
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The one thing I am getting from this thread is that I am not a hopeless gardener after all. Bad things happen to many good gardeners, not just me. Not that I don't commiserate with everyone whose plantings have not gone to plan this year. It is so frustrating.
 
gardener
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Pineapple sage. I bought them on a whim, and too soon, then couldn't get them into the ground, because of all the rain, and the lack of explosives, to dig with. Surprise lilies - I'm blaming it on accidentally saying 'thank you' for them, to the kind, elderly neighbor who first gave them to me, the clucked her tongue, and chided me, because it's bad luck, lol. My elderberry. Who knows, it might survive, but I'm not taking bets. I'm in the northern Ozarks of MO, so in a similar situation to Pearl's - not flooded, but VERY wet ground. I may have even lost my rose of Sharon & my asparagus... ☹
 
Posts: 4
Location: Southeast Michigan, suburban, zone 6a
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I lost one hive my first year. They absconded in October and I was devastated...and they left on purpose. Losing 25 hives ...cannot imagine my upset or yours!
 
pollinator
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These terrible tales are the most heart warming things I read here... 'transparency' is also 'clarity' I think....thanks, all!  ox
 
Posts: 208
Location: On the plateau in TN
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Last pea plant lifted off garden with two tiny pods have drying on a steel trash can, I can blame the pea plants death on myself, too late planted in season.

One Anne raspberry new plant probably dead, but other 4 doing OK or great, so not too many worries about it.

Looks like maybe two blue berry plants dead, one ok for now, dogs tripping over sticks and snapped them?
 
gardener
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This year we have lost our zucchini squash plants to a sudden infestation, I plan to start the winter squashes in new plots this year.
All the wet weather, which we are not used to, is causing several first time problems with the tomatoes but that is about it trouble wise, so far.

Redhawk
 
Susan Mené
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I will now change my reply to "What lived in my garden this year and lessons learned.

1.  I have harvested a few zucchini. I think I will end up with a decent amount; they are just starting to flourish now. They seem to be hanging on through the heat wave this weekend.
What I learned:  One stand-alone container zucchini plant is succumbing to probable squash borers. (mushy stems.)  It is in a pot which I placed in the exact same place I lost a squash plant last year, for the same reason. One Darwin award for me for repeating my mistake with forethought.

2.  I have successfully harvested plenty of Trionfo Violetto beans.  I picked these because wow, cool, PURPLE BEANS!
WHAT I LEARNED:  YAY to indulging my whim.  I was happy as a toddler when the giant purple beans showed up.  

3.  Late Bush beans are healthily coming in.  Beans seem to like my land, had a banner crop last year.  These taste better than the purple ones.
What I learned:  Common bush beans taste better than purple ones and building a bean tower/teepee over the winter will be totally worth it.  I also learned my husband is allergic to string beans.

I am now placing my hopes in broccoli and brussels sprouts, and looking forward to some garlic next spring. Hoping for some more beets, carrots and chard.
Ultimately, I learned that too much rain followed by too much heat can foil my best laid plans.


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My first tiny harvest from spring
 
pollinator
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In the spirit of Rocky and Bullwinkle titles,

"What died in your new gardens? so far..."

-or-

"Huh....our fence always kept rabbits out in previous years!....."

:-/

Pretty much the most disastrous garden in our 20 years at it.   The bunnies and the cutworms kept 'tag-teaming' on the Swiss chard and the kale, two "how-can-you-possibly-kill" crops that have been staples. (Although I'm also the family black sheep now, having admitted to killing the rhubarb stand that was here when we moved in.)  Now the bunnies see to be entertaining themselves with the beans and the peppers.  It's a very cluttered garden and would be difficult to play 'Rambo' in there with the pellet gun, even if wearing camo and sporting a laser sight.  As it stands, they seem disinterested in the corn, tomatoes, onion/garlic items, squash and aromatic spices.  If I put a coyote statue out there, the buns would probably laugh and leave a pile of beans in front of it as an offering joke.  Going out now to rig an impromptu fence around the remaining sweet bells..... (sigh)


 
Pearl Sutton
gardener & bricolagier
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This is by far the worst garden I have done in over 30 years of it. I'm on the edge of flood territory in the Midwest, we have fungus, and waterlogged soil, and it seems to have compacted badly, and I don't know if all the microorganisms drowned or what, but the soil feels weird.

I'll go for what IS making it, much shorter list:
Sunchokes look ok, a few peanut plants look ok, about 4 radishes might be ready to check, I see the first purple bell pepper coloring up, a few small green tomatoes, and the beans are at least tall enough to notice the fence. I started planting in April. It's late July, and I have harvested.... ZERO. Not a single thing. This is pathetic.

My mom joked with me the other day "you are ranked as a Gardener on Permies, do they know you can't even grow zucchini this year?"  :)

This is pathetic.
 
Sue Magyari
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Location: Southeast Michigan, suburban, zone 6a
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I can never keep basil alive. What is with that? Lots of water, sun, slightly acid soil, nothing  too extreme. Most things like  the  microclimate but I kill every basil I put in. Sigh. I love basil. I am in SE Michigan with a 6a zone.
 
Susan Mené
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Sorry you both are having such trouble too.
b]Pearl Sutton[/b] your statement  "I started planting in April. It's late July, and I have harvested.... ZERO. Not a single thing. This is pathetic." fits me to a tee, except for the beans.  John Weiland The bunny population on middle and eastern Long Island this year is prodigious; fortunately for my garden, the young ones are drowning themselves in my pool--at least one a day and my two dogs help.  However, the fact that there's nothing much to eat in the garden is the real reason I'm not aggravated with them.

On the up side, my foraging of wineberry will be abundant, as long as I get out there every day this week to compete with the birds (I always share with them).
Lamb"s quarters have been delicious. Going carefully cultivate them next year, unless someone advises me otherwise.
Enjoy the day!




 
Bryant RedHawk
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hau Sue, do you have mycorrhizae in your soil? basil is a plant that loves to have mycorrhizae in and around its roots, also you might need to check the soil nutrients, basil likes to have a complete menu of minerals in the soil.
If you have some rock dust or green sand those would give your soil a mineral boost.

Redhawk
 
Bryant RedHawk
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hau John, We too have critters being problems that never were before. The squirrels have made a comeback and they liked our pears so well that we now have no pears on our previously loaded pear tree.
Time for some squirrel and dumplings here.  The rabbits have been helping with keeping the grass clipped but so far they have not taken a liking to any of our garden plants, lucky them, no rabbit on the menu as yet.
caught one yearling raccoon in the hen yard, he was captured and taken to a release area about 7 miles from us. lucky him that wolf thought he was cute and should be released instead of dispatched.

Redhawk
 
Sue Magyari
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Hi Bryant Redhawk,
Sorry if I am not replying correctly...still trying to figure out this site. I will definitely try both next year. Likely too late for this year. Good suggestions and something I can work on.
 
gardener
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Zucchini & yellow squash didn't do great. Harvested a few but expected many. Vine borers appeared to be the problem. Other squash & melons are still alive.

Amaranth sprouted & then did not grow any more.

Looks like an animal trampled a few corn plants last night.

Had many large beetles on beans this year. They damaged a lot of leaves but the plants survived & are still producing many types of beans.

 
Bryant RedHawk
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Sue, you still have time to make those additions.

Redhawk
 
Susan Mené
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It seems like a good amount of people have experienced sprouting with lack of growth, as I have, this year.  Have any of you more experienced gardeners/permies seen this before?  
 
Bryant RedHawk
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I've had a similar to this year occurrence once before in 1970, the cause of that failed crop year was contamination created by the land that was designated for the laboratory growing area had been a dumping area for the chemistry labs.
I did my first true remediation work on that area and in 1971 we were successful in getting the plants to grow well.
The remediation involved 100 kilos of mycelium being inoculated along with 100 kilos of prepared bacteria, (this was in a 1/2 acre space) both being added within a 3 week period and keeping the moisture levels fairly consistent over the winter months.
At the beginning of spring (March15th) I added 20 yards of freshly finished compost that had good bacteria and fungi numbers per counts with the microscope. (1/2 was worked into the soil and the rest was top dressing for the new raised beds inside the green house foundation)
Once I was happy with the soil test results and my advising professor concurred with my assessment, we built a green house over the remediated land for our experimental plants.

This year it is my belief that what so many, in so many different locations, are experiencing is more along the lines of results of global warming and the climate change events.
We are in the 10th year of the cycling towards climate change and I don't expect things to go backwards towards the climate we used to know.
I've been keeping records in Arkansas for the last 37 years and the overall picture is a shift in the seasons more than an overall heating up effect.
With a shift in seasonality, we can expect that if we plant at the times of year we are used to, we will be planting at least 2 weeks later in the season than we should.

Example, this year the crops that are doing best for us were planted a full month sooner than we would have planted them just 4 years ago.
We planted lettuces in the middle of Feb. instead of the middle of March and we had nice lettuce until the beginning of this month (when the heat finally got here), previous years lettuce would bolt by may 25th and it needed to be planted by the middle of March.
Carrots this year started off growing well but the extensive and near continual rains stunted their root growth, so much so that what would have been 6 to 8 inch carrots when harvested, were only 4 inch carrots and they were skinny instead of well filled out.
Beets didn't produce bulbs large enough to be beyond baby beet size.
Squash bugs showed up one month earlier than in previous years too.

Redhawk
 
Susan Mené
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HELP!!!  I accidentally unsubscribed from this topic!!!  How can I undo that??

Anyway, I thought it was climate change; I thought that I planted earlier, but next year I need to plant MUCH earlier.

 
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I posted a thread a couple days ago about not being able to grow the easy stuff. And how the cool weather stuff is thriving in Florida's summer.
On this thread, I wanted to mention...those of you with cutworms - I lost all of my early tomatoes to them. The second planting survived. (Until they decided they didn't like the heat.) I surrounded the transplants with crushed egg shells instead of putting them into the planting hole. I'm going to try that with the squash I started a couple days ago - maybe it'll keep the borers away?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Susan Mené wrote:HELP!!!  I accidentally unsubscribed from this topic!!!  How can I undo that??

Anyway, I thought it was climate change; I thought that I planted earlier, but next year I need to plant MUCH earlier.


Hey Susan! Up near the top of the thread (below the headers) are buttons, click the one that says "watch topic" and you'll get notifications again :)
 
pollinator
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Definitely noticing changes in temperature (remembering I am down under and in winter). My peas have been going for two months now, but not a single fruit (daytime temps have been high, despite cold at night).
I am also very nervous that what we call bean bugs (but i think in the US are called cucurbit beetles, a long green guy with orange spots) didn't die off with the cold. I just saw one in my yard. These poopers decimated my beans last year and apparently are just hanging around waiting for the next course. I am now growing tomatoes during the winter to try to avoid bug pressure, but it isn't helping the beans.
 
master pollinator
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We're entering the Dead of Summer.  Young Tatume Squash seem to be giving up.  Poona Keera and Armenian Cucumbers are still alive but not bearing much, after being incredibly prolific earlier.
 
Carla Burke
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And, the squirrels are now in the process of mowing down all the peaches off my beloved little 'almond'* tree!


*thought for the last 8months that it was an almond tree. Oops.
 
Carla Burke
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Oh. And the squirrels & chipmunks have done such a thorough number on my basil, that is honestly forgotten I'd even planted it - until I noticed a single stem sticking up, and wondered what on earth that was - on closer inspection it still smells vaguely of basil. 😒
 
Susan Mené
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Carla Burke wrote:And, the squirrels are now in the process of mowing down all the peaches off my beloved little 'almond'* tree!


*thought for the last 8months that it was an almond tree. Oops.



Thank you for the laugh!  Sorry about the peaches, though.
 
Michael Moreken
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Susan Mené wrote:

Michael Moreken wrote:I have to keep in mind effects of having black walnut on three sides of property for ~next five years.



Fortunately, I have black walnut only on one side of my property; the trees are on neighbor's land.  I'd harvest the nuts, but I'm allergic.  I have had decent success grown pole beans in beds in close proximity to the trees.  Have you tried or have you had any success with any of the "juglone resistant" veggies?  I also tried squash, supposedly resistant, but it didn't even sprout.

Susan



I have a file of juglone resistance plants:

Tolerant to Juglone

Alliums, Amaranth, Jerusalem artichoke, Beans, Beets, Carrot, Cauliflower, Corn, Chard, Garlic, Quinua, Spinach, Parsley, Parsnips, Black Raspberry (Rubus occidentalis), Soybeans, Squash and Melons, Root crops, Sunflowers, Strawberries, + Wheat

For current deaths two raspberry Anne plants, maybe all comfrey died?
 
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I got a seed kit for Christmas. The cucumbers grew prodigiously, until they suddenly died off within a week. The broccoli has been on its last legs for months. I planted my mint too close to my parsley, and the mint smothered the parsley -- had to buy a new parsley plant the other day to replace it.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Checked my berry bed today, out of 18 plants, 6 are still alive.
 
Carla Burke
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Are we going predictive? Because, it's starting to look a lot like the next thing in my garden to die could well be the squirrels.
 
Carla Burke
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I can't help wondering how much shorter this thread would be, if the title had been, 'what's doing well, in your garden, this year?'
 
Michael Moreken
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Kai Walker wrote:

Michael Moreken wrote:Was growing tomatoes in buckets upside down.  One fell when the plastic handle broke in a thunder storm.    So pinch of the flowers, the tomato stem was broke, so planted the tomato sideways into a bed and watered it in.  After pinching off most of leaf stalks too.



How well do the upside down tomato plants produce?



They are very happy until the plastic handle broke, now both doing fine in a heugle bed.

For current deaths three raspberry Anne plants, all comfrey did not sprout.
 
Yeah. What he said. Totally. Wait. What? Sorry, I was looking at this tiny ad:
Dave Burton's Boot Adventures at Wheaton Labs and Basecamp
https://permies.com/t/119676/permaculture-projects/Dave-Burton-Boot-Adventures-Wheaton
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