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berm sheds

 
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putting the poles on top.

 
paul wheaton
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Ron's design sample of the upcoming facade.

Ron has elected a 11 degree slope - the same slope at the roof.
berm-shed-facade-1.jpg
[Thumbnail for berm-shed-facade-1.jpg]
berm-shed-facade-2.jpg
[Thumbnail for berm-shed-facade-2.jpg]
 
paul wheaton
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The billboard material goes up and then some dirt
berm-shed-billboard.jpg
[Thumbnail for berm-shed-billboard.jpg]
berm-shed-dirt.jpg
[Thumbnail for berm-shed-dirt.jpg]
 
paul wheaton
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and then the facade
berm-shed-facade-3.jpg
[Thumbnail for berm-shed-facade-3.jpg]
berm-shed-facade-4.jpg
[Thumbnail for berm-shed-facade-4.jpg]
 
paul wheaton
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putting in the angle braces

 
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Excellent video - great rehab job on the shed!

My thought was, even though it would require metal, have you considered running a wire rope around the top of the rear vertical posts and running it out like a guy wire, which then gets covered in the berm dirt? Maybe just where the forces will be greatest? Or spots where you really don't want to block the traffic between the cells?
 
paul wheaton
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putting on the dirt.  

Notice the lovely ramp we made!

 
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paul wheaton wrote:Here is my primary concern with a saddle joint.   I see way too many of the first kind.   The second kind has 98% of the notch strength, plus 800% of the beam strength.



A note of clarification — this isn't quite right per my understandings. This type of joint is often used as the way most beams fail is at the point of maximum moment (and thus the resulting tensile/compression forces). Since the beam is being supported at this joint, the moment forces are such that only the top half of the log is of concern (see attachment). In bending, total tensile strength of the cross section is focused at the extremity of the log (forces increase by a square function of the cross-section's height). This is why we have I-beams: tiny little cross-section until the end where the beef lives that carries the real load.

As a more concrete points:

- If you remove none of the cross-section, the beam remains at 100% strength
- If you remove the bottom 50% of the cross-section, the beam remains at 100% strength
- If you remove the bottom 75% of the cross-section, the beam remains at 79% strength*

*Calculated by taking the section modulus of a circle and subtracting the section modulus of the "beam" cut out by the joint (25% of the height, or half the radius). See other attachment. Technically, it is even stronger as I have assumed to remove more material (a complete rectangular section) than would be physically possible since it's a circular cut.

This type of joint reduces shearing stresses most, but beams almost never fail in shear (a beam that fails in shear typically sags in a horror-movie-like way long before it fails) .

All that is to say, it is often a little non-intuitive how much material you can remove from beams without affecting their strength.
IMG_1119.jpeg
Moment diagram for typical saddle joint applications
Moment diagram for typical saddle joint applications
Screen-Shot-2020-02-09-at-3.22.17-PM.png
Section modulus math
Section modulus math
 
Kyle Neath
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I forgot to mention, if this beam is being supported at the ends of the beam (vs two points at 1/3 and 2/3 length), the math works out even better since there is almost no moment (and resulting tensile/compressive) forces at all. Here the bending strength plays no role in the strength of the structure. The more to the ends of the beam it is supported, the less cross-section needed at the support to retain 100% strength (since failure will occur in the middle).
IMG_1118.jpeg
Moment diagram with end supported beams
Moment diagram with end supported beams
 
Jay Angler
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That is an awesome ramp you built to get the dirt up on top. It looks like very sandy dirt? Did you sift it, or is it natural to your property the way it looks in the video?

What do you figure you'll grow on top to stabilize the dirt?
 
paul wheaton
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One of the end pieces:

 
paul wheaton
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Jay Angler wrote:That is an awesome ramp you built to get the dirt up on top. It looks like very sandy dirt? Did you sift it, or is it natural to your property the way it looks in the video?

What do you figure you'll grow on top to stabilize the dirt?



We have two properties.   This berm shed is at the property we call "basecamp" which is like a 20 acre rock - but with some of this sandy dirt in one small part.  

We will be planting the berm shed this year - probably with lots of grasses.



 
Jay Angler
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Great job on the end of the shed! The aerial shots really gives one the feeling of how this shed is going to just "disappear" when it's done and planted. If wind comes from the road direction, I would think it would help to divert it upward and keep the building warmer even if the shed isn't closed. If that was a busy road, it would have a great sound-deadening effect on traffic noise also.
 
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If I were there I might have shared an opinion similar to what is drawn in blue here - a Beefier beam, and sideways support for that first cell.

Looks good though!
A-quick-cell-phone-sketch-of-Wheaton-Base-Camp-s-berm-shed-south-end-termination..jpg
A quick cell phone sketch of Wheaton Base Camp's berm shed south end termination.
A quick cell phone sketch of Wheaton Base Camp's berm shed south end termination.
 
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Sweet rehab of the shed! Thanks for documenting the tyrific progress, do we have a tally of how many times the sand has been added to and removed from the roof?
This could be the iteration that lasts for... maybe a decade? maybe 2 decades? The latest video shows some sturdy looking tarps gong on top, combined with the slick drip edge this sure looks like an effective way to keep it dry,  with all the drainage (which in hindsite, probably could have been graded before we put posts in) looking forward to seeing what you decide to seed on the roof that will grow in sand!
 
paul wheaton
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putting on the facade

 
paul wheaton
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This image came from Orin's bootcamp thread.

Some grasses were dug up from other hugelkultur beds.  I'm not sure, but I think they are a ruminant friendly endophyte tall fescue grass.



(this video and image is from josiah's bootcamp thread)



 
paul wheaton
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I just stumbled across this picture of the berm shed nearing completion - from josiah's bootcamp thread:

 
paul wheaton
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Shaping the dirt a bit (from Orin's bootcamp pics)

 
I don't like that guy. The tiny ad agrees with me.
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