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Tree id help. Sumac look a like

 
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This one has me stumped.

It resembles sumac but has a fruit or drupe instead of a staghorn.

Any ideas?
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Walnut?

 
J Davis
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Tyler Ludens wrote:Walnut?



Maybe, I suppose those could morph into something more nut like. Will keep that in mind. Tnx
 
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That sure looks like sumac.

I wonder if the 'fruit' is a gall?

These are more pear shaped, caused by an aphid...
http://www.walterreeves.com/gardening-q-and-a/sumac-gall-identification/

from another site...

http://www.nashturley.org/2016/08/01/sumac-gall-aphids-master-tricksters/
 
Tyler Ludens
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I think Judith is right.  Looking at the pic again the "fruit" is in the middle of a branch, not on the end where a nut would be.

 
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Looks like a paw paw tree -- a native American tree. Fruit is very edible-- kind of like banana custard taste.
 
J Davis
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Judith Browning wrote:That sure looks like sumac.

I wonder if the 'fruit' is a gall?

These are more pear shaped, caused by an aphid...
http://www.walterreeves.com/gardening-q-and-a/sumac-gall-identification/

from another site...


http://www.nashturley.org/2016/08/01/sumac-gall-aphids-master-tricksters/



Quite possible. Will have some fun cracking one open To find out!
 
J Davis
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Barbara Martin wrote:Looks like a paw paw tree -- a native American tree. Fruit is very edible-- kind of like banana custard taste.



The "fruit" made me think that too! But leaves are definitely not paw paw. I have a few young paw paw. But no fruit yet.
 
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Cut a slip of the wood and put it under a black-light. If it fluoresces, it is a Staghorn Sumac.
 
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Just to clarify, walnuts are easy to distinguish by smell (just like a walnut

...and pawpaws have different looking leaves, fatter than what you have there.

It also appears to me as more of a gall than a fruit, but I'n no expert.

Snap a branch off one and see if it emits a strange, nutty like smell. If so, could be the "Tree of heaven" - I am dealing with some of these currently and they are fast growers that root sprout and go seed crazy when they feel threatened.

 
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If there's more than one 'fruit' go ahead and cut one open...the suspense is growing
 
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The way the leaves are turning that beautiful red makes me think sumac also.   Walnut start turning about now but turn yellow and are starting to fall already.
 
Travis Johnson
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Judith Browning wrote:The way the leaves are turning that beautiful red makes me think sumac also.   Walnut start turning about now but turn yellow and are starting to fall already.



It is making the "turn" here as well. Red Maples are turning to red, and at Rock the Flock, it was so cold that I had (2) sweatshirts on over a T-shirt (granted it was windy on the hill though).
 
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Judith Browning wrote:That sure looks like sumac.

I wonder if the 'fruit' is a gall?

These are more pear shaped, caused by an aphid...
http://www.walterreeves.com/gardening-q-and-a/sumac-gall-identification/

from another site...


http://www.nashturley.org/2016/08/01/sumac-gall-aphids-master-tricksters/



Aphid galls for the win! Thanks all. It is a sumac.
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Travis Johnson
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I am glad I was correct, but touching that like you have would make me break out so bad in rash that I would have to go to the hospital for Steroid medication. I am wicked sensitive to Staghorn Sumac.

While the wood is small in size, if you saw it into narrow boards, and then make a small cabinet out of it or something, and then backlight it with a blacklight light bulb, it will glow in the dark in a cool way. Only a few wood types do that. (A finish will protect people from getting rahes from the sap of the wood).
 
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Travis Johnson wrote:I am glad I was correct, but touching that like you have would make me break out so bad in rash that I would have to go to the hospital for Steroid medication. I am wicked sensitive to Staghorn Sumac.



Oh my, the power of suggestion is strong. After reading this, I began to itch. Alot. Lol.
 
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Travis Johnson wrote:While the wood is small in size, if you saw it into narrow boards, and then make a small cabinet out of it or something, and then backlight it with a blacklight light bulb, it will glow in the dark in a cool way. Only a few wood types do that. (A finish will protect people from getting rahes from the sap of the wood).



I imagine it is a phosphorus bio-accumulator then? I've eaten Sumac. When my family first moved to Ohio in 1997, we lived near Amish, who often sold sumac berries as a spice or in drinks. I think it tasted like lemon if I recall it correctly. The rash makes me think of urushiol. It might be dangerous to eat it if you get poison ivy rashes. It might make the list of things people have eaten while blithely unaware of a danger to their health but still not suffered for it. I mean, crap, people eat ackee fruit, cashews, flaming cocktails, puffer fish, and live octopus.
 
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Looks like Staghorn Sumac and the "fruit" is a Gall. Gall are a kind of swelling growth on the external tissues of plants, fungi, or inserts.

I'm very interested to see so many in a row.

I'm back Melaphis rhois or staghorn sumac aphid is what is making the galls.

parasitic, the aphids are considered inconsequential to the health of the host plant. Which is fine.

Cheers

-Justyn
 
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