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Can I Replant a Garlic bed, if properly dressed? :-)

 
greenhorn
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The adjacent bed was potatoes i plan to plant with garlic. But that bed is too small and it'd be easiest to plant garlic again where I just harvested it in June. Is there anything specific to feed a bed for garlic, considering garlic takes from the soil what it needs and gives as exudates something of value in return, or so I think is the plant ideal?  Thanks, OgreNick
 
greenhorn
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Location: Zone 9A, 45S 168E, 329m Queenstown, NZ
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It is tempting fate to replant in the same bed that you grew garlic in the previous season because there are many bacterial and fungal diseases in the soil that could infect your garlic if the growing conditions are not ideal. If you have no other option, go ahead but keep a close eye on your plants as they are growing - any sign of yellowing in the new growth, cull the plants. Yellowing tips are normal but not in the new growth. I usually sprinkle a generous dressing of sheep pellets over the garlic bed at planting time before mulching with wood chips. Ideally, garlic needs to be grown on a three or four year rotation to minimise the risk of a build up of diseases.
 
rancher
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The only time I've seen it done year after year it had a pretty slight but steady decline over the first few years and then a near total collapse in yield around year 6. The bed was dressed with some chicken/duck bedding, any random potting soil that had built up over the year and a thick layer of old hay. I'm positive there are better approaches but rot diseases were definitely increasing
 
rancher
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s. lowe wrote:The only time I've seen it done year after year it had a pretty slight but steady decline over the first few years and then a near total collapse in yield around year 6. The bed was dressed with some chicken/duck bedding, any random potting soil that had built up over the year and a thick layer of old hay. I'm positive there are better approaches but rot diseases were definitely increasing



So what about perennial alliums?  Do they also crash?  What about if annual garlic is also planted in once or twice?  (I ask, having thrown in the towel on my small annual bed and just planted tons of bulbs, including alliums, and was thinking of poking in some garlic for the winter...)
 
rancher
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Location: South Carolina 8a
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I chop and drop everything and re mulch after every season. I also use Korean Organic Farming Inputs and various compost teas to keep the soil web healthy. I then don't worry about crop rotation or anything like that because it has become unnecessary.
 
greenhorn
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I don't have enough plantable spaces to rotate crops they way that garden guides always tell you.  I have one space that I have been using for garlic and tomatoes the past 4 years.  In October, I pull out the tomato plants and plant the garlic, adding a couple inches of compost, the tomato vines, then fall leaves once they are available.  Then in June I plant out tomatoes (and maybe some eggplant and peppers) from bedding plants between the garlic rows.  I mulch everything with whatever garden clippings are available.  By July the garlic is ready to harvest just as the tomatoes are really starting to grow.

So far, it seems to work out fine year to year.  The plants produce as well as I expect them to.
 
rancher
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The consensus in this thread, developing at the same time, is "only every 4-6 years".
 
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