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Oxalate Questions

 
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As many of you know, a good percentage of perennial vegetables/greens are high in oxalates. Being in zone 5 and wanting to eat mostly perennial crops, as well as using potatoes as my caloric staple, I want to eat well and make sure im not putting my kidneys or bones at risk.

Does anyone think stapling with potatoes WHILE NOT consuming much dairy will be dangerous? I will be eating meat/eggs daily but little to no dairy. I know countries like Ireland haves stapled with potatoes for hundreds of years, but they also consumed lots of dairy. Peruvians have as well for thousands of years, but they have thousands of years of genetic adapting to eating said potatoes. What do you think?

And besides potatoes, I will only eat oxalate containing greens (good king henry, sorrel, caucasian spinach, chickories) once a week, the rest of the week eating brassicas. Is that too much? Or fine?

I am healthy with no personal or family history of kidney stones or calcium deficiencies.
 
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I am someone who eats potatoes almost everyday. also for about 10 months of the year i am eating kale with the said potatoes. From what i can tell the Oxalate can be significantly reduced by cooking either by boiling or steaming. We often employ a steam and fry in butter for the potatoes with the greens being sauteed with the potatoes.

SO my suggestion would be to use these great resources and cook them. and limit the raw consumption.

I imagine you would be receiving calcium from the brassicas as well as the meat and eggs.

I would also suggest the addition of bone broth to your diet, to help with more calcium absorption.

please use fat when eating green vegetables to help absorb fat soluble vitamins

Here are some resources
Cooking methods effect on Oxalate
Great read on minerals in general
 
C. West
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good links and points jordan, we will be using pork fat to cook with and will be eating plenty of kale
 
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Awareness:  knowing what does or doesn't contain oxalate, help you to CHOOSE.
I've had times when potatoes were a staple for me, and it worked fine. But then the other ingredients I ate were low on oxalate.
Nowadays, I do consume cacao everyday (very high in oxalate), as this is my stimulant (I drink practically no coffee at the moment), so I have to be careful with other ingredients high on oxalate.
Chocolate with nuts? Not for me, as nuts are high in oxalate.
It's all about priority.
 
C. West
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oh yeah i should mention nuts will be a big part of my diet (in a few years when they produce), my plan was to can nut butters to get rid of some oxalates, but if baking isnt getting rid of oxalates in potatoes, i doubt canning nut butters will either. something to consider, might have to limit nuts to once a week
 
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C. West wrote:oh yeah i should mention nuts will be a big part of my diet (in a few years when they produce), my plan was to can nut butters to get rid of some oxalates, but if baking isnt getting rid of oxalates in potatoes, i doubt canning nut butters will either. something to consider, might have to limit nuts to once a week



SO i am not sure if this helps reduce oxalate in nuts. What i do is i shell our hazelnuts, than i soak them in a solution of 1 TBS of sea salt + however much warm water to cover, to 4 cups of shelled hazelnuts. The longer they soak the more salty they become. anyways this will help reduce the amount of phytic acid, and maybe it would help with oxalate as well i am not sure.
I then either dry them, or i roast them in the oven and than turn them into nut butter, along with coconut oil.

What type of nuts will you be eating?(when your trees are old enough that is:P)

I found these website which had some useful information
Low Oxalate Diet Benefits and Risks
Another low Oxalate Diet Website
 
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C. West wrote:
I am healthy with no personal or family history of kidney stones or calcium deficiencies.



I am not a nutrition expert but if you have no special reason to think oxalates will harm you, I don't know why you are worried. Won't a normal varied healthy diet of real foods be fine? And people today don't have all the answers about what is a good diet. 10 years ago, 20 years ago, 30 years ago, people were concerned or obsessed about other food issues, and in the future those perceptions will continue changing. Oxalates are (by far) not the only issue in food, but variety and whole real foods seems to me to be the solution for most food issues.
 
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Rebecca Norman wrote:

C. West wrote:
I am healthy with no personal or family history of kidney stones or calcium deficiencies.



I am not a nutrition expert but if you have no special reason to think oxalates will harm you, I don't know why you are worried. Won't a normal varied healthy diet of real foods be fine? And people today don't have all the answers about what is a good diet. 10 years ago, 20 years ago, 30 years ago, people were concerned or obsessed about other food issues, and in the future those perceptions will continue changing. Oxalates are (by far) not the only issue in food, but variety and whole real foods seems to me to be the solution for most food issues.




I will be eating a much more specific diet than most, as i want to eat mostly self sufficiently, and my two main staples (nuts, potatoes) are high in oxalates, and more than half of the staple greens i will be growing have them. the average person need not worry, but if i just ate whatever whenever based on what im growing i could run into problems. but im not too worried
 
C. West
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jordan barton wrote:

C. West wrote:oh yeah i should mention nuts will be a big part of my diet (in a few years when they produce), my plan was to can nut butters to get rid of some oxalates, but if baking isnt getting rid of oxalates in potatoes, i doubt canning nut butters will either. something to consider, might have to limit nuts to once a week



SO i am not sure if this helps reduce oxalate in nuts. What i do is i shell our hazelnuts, than i soak them in a solution of 1 TBS of sea salt + however much warm water to cover, to 4 cups of shelled hazelnuts. The longer they soak the more salty they become. anyways this will help reduce the amount of phytic acid, and maybe it would help with oxalate as well i am not sure.
I then either dry them, or i roast them in the oven and than turn them into nut butter, along with coconut oil.

What type of nuts will you be eating?(when your trees are old enough that is:P)

I found these website which had some useful information
Low Oxalate Diet Benefits and Risks
Another low Oxalate Diet Website



i will try this! and im not stapling with any main nut, but will be growing a bit of everything that i can.

Japanese heartnut (Juglans ailantifolia)
Carpathian walnut
Beckwith butternut
Almond oracle (late bloom)(3)
Grimo hazelnut
Hazelbert
Ultra northern pecan deerstand
Chinese pecan (Carya cathayensis)(oil)
Chinquapin nut (2)(nsf)
Dunstan chestnut (pig feed?)
Pinus cembra
Pinus cembroides (mexican pine)(excellent flavor, 15mm, most proteine)
Pinus edulis (most commercial american species, 25mm, good cooked)
Pinus koreainus
Burton hican
Yellowhorn (oil)
Beech nut (oil)(Fagus sylvatica)(tortuosa?)

right now i just have a few young trees but im looking towards the next 10 years
 
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