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Can you buy natural paint for inside walls?

 
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Right now I'm working with Zero VOC paint and it's still very strong-smelling with a bad effect on me if I spend too long painting.  I get dizzy and faint when exposed to certain chemicals.

In the distant future, I'll need to paint my bedroom.  It's a small room, so the fumes will be too strong and I'll have to move out for weeks/months.  

I would like to spend some more money to buy paint that won't have as strong an effect on me.  But does this exist?  What do I plug into google to find this?
 
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Google lime wash or natural lime paint

There are a few brands, but tricky to find. You can DIY but probably not worth it for a small bedroom.  Definitely would be if you needed several gallons, paint is stupid expensive these days.
 
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I was surprised to see this milk paint at crappy tire the other day:

https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/rust-oleum-interior-milk-paint-pewter-grey-946-ml-0488049p.html

Bloody expensive, and being available at crappy tire is not exactly proof of quality..
 
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I used Volvox clay paint for inside my house. I chose it because it is 100% VOC-free, doesn't need a primer (I used it straight on plasterboard, I'm not sure how to go about using it over other paint or surfaces though), and all the colours except ivory only need one coat, so it worked out to be cheaper than the other options.
 
D Nikolls
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Kate Downham wrote:I used Volvox clay paint for inside my house. I chose it because it is 100% VOC-free, doesn't need a primer (I used it straight on plasterboard, I'm not sure how to go about using it over other paint or surfaces though), and all the colours except ivory only need one coat, so it worked out to be cheaper than the other options.



That sounds rather nice; have you had it on long enough to comment on durability?
 
D Nikolls
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https://cottagepaint.com/product-category/cottage-paint/

This company makes clay/chalk based paint, and shows quite a few dealers around Van. Isl.

Not much mention of VOC, or lack thereof, on their website.. hm.
 
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D Nikolls wrote:

Kate Downham wrote:I used Volvox clay paint for inside my house. I chose it because it is 100% VOC-free, doesn't need a primer (I used it straight on plasterboard, I'm not sure how to go about using it over other paint or surfaces though), and all the colours except ivory only need one coat, so it worked out to be cheaper than the other options.



That sounds rather nice; have you had it on long enough to comment on durability?


Nearly 3 years.

The bathroom that we painted in blue looks as good as new. Everywhere else we painted in ivory, and anywhere untouched by messy child hands looks good, but places that have been touched a lot by children running hands along walls and bouncing off them will need touching up soon I think. We lived here while we painted it and there was no smell, so touching it up with leftover paint isn't such a big deal.

In hindsight I probably should have chosen a different colour for the walls, but I think this might be an issue for any natural paint, that white walls are not a good choice when there's children around.
 
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I've used Ecos Paints several times. It really has no odor, and no voc's.

https://www.ecospaints.net
 
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“The Greenest Paint There Is” http://www.milkpaint.com/path_safe.html
A milk paint by Old Fashioned Milk Paint - Utah, USA
 
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Milk paint is fairly simple to make, especially for the small amounts you'll need for one room. Here are a couple recipes to choose from:

https://www.bobvila.com/articles/milk-paint-recipe/

https://www.wikihow.com/Make-Milk-Paint

Personally, I'd go with the Bob Vila one, it looks a lot easier to follow.
 
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At a friend's house,..
we pulled clay from the ground, screened out the small stones and troweled that on.
On drywall it stuck good.

On the plaster that is used on drywall seems, it didn't stick worth a damn.
Too powdery for it to stick.
If clay was used on the seems too, it would probably work well.
 
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