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gravel/woodchip for road and path.

 
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We are working on a wedding venue in our woods. There are three separate spots that need gravel or mulch and I cant decide what would be best. I would prefer to do all mulch, since it is going through my field and I really don't want to add a bunch of rocks to it(especially if we decide to no longer host weddings and want it to be a pasture again). If you look at the picture I posted there is a grey line and a yellow box splitting it in half.

The first line from the road through the woods will be driven on by cars.
The yellow box will be a parking lot.
The remainder of the grey line will be a walking path to there ceremony spot. It will also be sparingly driven on (for people who aren't able to walk that far and for use to drive a truck out in order to load/unload chairs)

In an ideal world I would to it all in mulch. But I'm thinking that the road through the woods and the parking lot probably need to be gravel. Something to keep in mind, this spot were using is at the top of a field that is on a small bluff. So there will be runoff when it rains.

What would you di if you were me?
Thanks for taking the time to read and respond if you choose to!
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master steward
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Sorry that this isn't what you're asking, but do you need to add anything?  I had a trail through my woods at my old place that was driven on about 20 times a year.  Where the tires compacted it, nothing grew.  It was in the shade so barely anything grew in between the tires.  So a quick run with the mower would keep that stringy growth from being a nuisance.  Just a thought.

If it's due to mud, I'm not sure what the best option is so I'll leave that up to other advisors
 
pollinator
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I use woodchips as paths, and they are awesome. For me it takes about six inches of chips initially to make the path and then maybe an inch a year to maintain. Tends to get some brambles in there but generally low maintenance. I get lots of free chips, I would not consider it if you are paying.

In my setup they are not an issue washing off unless people go off the trail. An ATV or similat weight vehicle should be fine. I even drive a small tractor on it. It is not sodden even with heavy rains at that thickness. I put down cedar branches when traversing hills as a "corduroy road" (can search on here for that term) before laying chips.

Done halfway right it should be a really nice path for foot traffic and even motorized wheelchairs and the like.
 
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Hi Taylor;
I agree with TJ on using the wood chips from the parking area to the ceremony.
The other section of road??? Like Mike mentioned , casual use during dry weather will just create a two track path.
But ,if it rains while there is traffic , it could get slippery / dug up in short order...
If it were me I would spring for gravel from the main road to the parking area.
It would look more professional, if you decide to continue with this venue.
The few vehicles traveling past should not tear things up much if at all.
 
gardener
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I'm part of a group that oversees a campground in our area and we have over a mile of trail we use wood chips on. A back pack sprayer with vinegar and a hoe is all we use to get at any weeds that pop up. We use chips in parking areas and have graveled the main road. If it were me I'd make sure I created a good crown on the road and gravel it. A good first impression for the venue Rustic but maintained.
 
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I really need more information, because I am not sure if this is a single wedding that is happening, or if it is going to be used as a wedding venue. My answers will change greatly depending upon the answer.
 
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