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Air Layering with Water?

 
master gardener
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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I saw this video today about air layering with water.



It looks interesting and seems like it could possibly create roots quicker than a normal air layer.

Anyone tried it?
 
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Several things are shown in the video (the method shown works with collected rain water) number one is the split of the branch to the woods starting layer. The amount of cambium exposed is maximized by the cut. Note the time mentioned is the same as a spagnum moss technique. I would expect good results and will be doing a trial of this technique in two weeks.

Redhawk
 
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very interesting. I imagine it would be imperative to not do this technique while it is freezing/frost weather? Maybe it would not matter. In the video it looks like it is summer or late spring.

does anyone know if the time of year matters for this technique. it looks quite easy, especially if it can been done in warmer weather.
 
Steve Thorn
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I've heard that air layering is more successful if done while the plant is actively growing, and like you mentioned, I think with this method it might be good if it's done after chances of frost or freeze have passed.

I can't speak from success unfortunately, just failure. I did a few air layers about a year ago in late Fall and didn't have much luck. The trees had pretty much stopped growing by then, so that was probably why they failed.

I might give it a shot later this Spring along with some regular air layers and see what happens.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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In my experiences spring to early summer is the window for success in air layering or branch pinning techniques. My current weather patterns are already in the late spring temp range and we are wet (3" over the past week).

Redhawk
 
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