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How do you like to Air Layer? (Making new trees from existing ones)

 
gardener
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If you haven't heard of air layering, it is creating a new plant (usually a tree or bush) from an existing one.

I love air layering! It can be such a great way to create new plants!

The picture below shows a good example of how it is usually done. The process begins by injuring a branch of the tree, then securing damp peat moss or soil on the area, and finally cutting the branch off after a few months and planting it as a new plant!


(source)

I love that this can be used to create own root fruit trees too, which can be hard to find at most nurseries!

There are many tutorials online and videos of many different ways to air layer.

Do you air layer? If so, do you have a particular way of doing it? What plants have you air layered? Do you have any tips or tricks for increased success?
 
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I tried it but it was too late in the year. They started to root but not enough. How early in the spring can you air layer?
 
Steve Thorn
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Ken W Wilson wrote:I tried it but it was too late in the year. They started to root but not enough.



I did a batch of about 10 late in the year last year, and one of them took where the branch had broken partially, and it developed a very large root. I might try ones next year with the branch partially broken since it worked so well with that one this past year!

How early in the spring can you air layer?



I've always heard after the last freeze, but I'm going to experiment this spring with some before that and some later in the season just to see which one works the best!

What kind of plants were you air layering?

 
Ken W Wilson
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I tried Lake Carpathian Walnut and Montmorency Cherry. I’ve got a couple walnuts growing from seedlings, but I still need a cherry.
 
Steve Thorn
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Ken W Wilson wrote:I tried Lake Carpathian Walnut and Montmorency Cherry. I’ve got a couple walnuts growing from seedlings, but I still need a cherry.



Neat!

I tried cherries too, but I haven't done any nuts yet.

That's so cool you've got some walnut seedlings. I hope to have some seedlings soon too!
 
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Hi I did air layering on a miniature rose bush.  Here is the video.  Worked well.  
 
Steve Thorn
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Deedee weston wrote:Hi I did air layering on a miniature rose bush.  Here is the video.  Worked well.



Very neat!

Have you air layered anything else?
 
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no mostly just roses, but I was going to try on some of my fruit trees  just for experiment.
 
Steve Thorn
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Deedee weston wrote:no mostly just roses, but I was going to try on some of my fruit trees  just for experiment.



That would be neat!

I'd like to try it on roses. I love how a rose looks, it's such a beautiful flower to me.
 
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I just discovered air layering and tried it on serviceberry and cherry trees.    It's been two weeks and the branches have not wilted or dried up so I'm taking that as a good sign!     I'm going to try some mountain laurel and a few other things as well.   this seems like a great way to get a jump start and skip the first couple years of  seedling/  cutting growing!
 
Steve Thorn
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That's awesome Heather!

I'm going to hopefully be doing some seviceberry and cherries soon too, so I'm excited to see how yours turns out!

Yeah, I love how they have a head start with some good roots formed already too, and that they are on their own roots and not grafted, which is my preference.
 
Just put the cards in their christmas stocking and PRESTO! They get it now! It's like you're the harry potter of permaculture. richsoil.com/cards
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