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Planted radishes - Why won't they grow?

 
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Hello!

I had direct sown some breakfast radishes and some hailstone radishes on the 28th of March. its been a week and a half and they seem to be growing really really slow. Please check the pictures of my progress.

given they have harvest time of 25 days they should have been 4 times the size they are now. Can some one please advise on what might be going on? why aren't they progressing like they should?

I am getting ready to put my other seedlings in the ground (tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, watermelons) in a week or two when it warms up nicely and I am afraid the same thing will happen to them. So trying to resolve whatever is happening.

I planted the radishes in composted manure. its 100% organic.
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pollinator
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This is my best year of record.keeping so far and I planted breakfast radishes on the 23rd, they aren't too terribly much further along than yours and it feels like they are growing at their normal rate (mine look like they came in more.uniformly than yours though). The harvest times are rough guidelines and are usually counted from the day of sprouting, mine sprouted on the first so I'm expecting to harvest them around the end of the month
 
Sahil Budhawani
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Thanks for your reply s.lowe. I was going based on this: Radish Growing

His progress in 10 days surpasses mine like crazy. His were already showing little bulbs at 10 days.
 
pollinator
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The 25 days will be in much warmer temperatures than you have now. That 25days will be in perfect conditions, not the conditions that any of us throw at them! They don't look sick or anything so all you need is patience.
 
Sahil Budhawani
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Thanks Skandi Rogers. Arent radishes cold weather crops tho? Best sown in early spring? Just wondering
 
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My thought was the weather.  I have grown radishes year round in N. California, zone 9b, but once it gets hot, so do the radishes.  In the summer I just throw a few seeds to be a beneficial, because they are to hot to enjoy.
 
Sahil Budhawani
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Jen Fulkerson wrote:My thought was the weather.  I have grown radishes year round in N. California, zone 9b, but once it gets hot, so do the radishes.  In the summer I just throw a few seeds to be a beneficial, because they are to hot to enjoy.



So you are saying they are best planted when it gets hot out?
 
pollinator
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Radishes grow at an exponential rate, I would say your radishes are looking great for how long they have been growing.

Keep in mind the 25 to 30 day grow time is based upon a fairly small immature root you can easily allow them to grow and extra 2 or 3 weeks to get a better sized root crop.  You also have to keep in mind that cold overnight lows will slow the growth rate down a bit but when it warms up a bit in a week or two you will see a much faster growth rate.   Radish plants can grow a radish root at an amazingly fast rate of speed.

I have grown a lot of radishes here as they are very cold tolerant and I have always had good luck with them.  I plant mine good and early Jan-February direct seed sow and I am generally collecting radishes by early May and through to early June.  We often still have overnight freezing in April but often warm up considerably in May sometimes up into the 70's and 80's which tends to make my radishes bolt.  About half the years that I plant them I get few radishes to eat.  I learned about 12 years ago that you can allow them to flower and go to seed and then collect basket fulls of the seed pods from them and eat those instead of the radishes.  Not only do they make a very pretty addition to your garden with lots and lots of showy flowers the little seed pods are quite tasty.

The seed pods are kind of like a snow pea/stringless green bean in texture with a mild sweet peppery radish flavor to them.  They are a very popular bar snack in Germany which is where I learned about the idea originally.  I like the fact that I can literally get a small basket full per plant rather than just one singular small radish root.  Anymore I eat most of them as radishes and then I leave a couple radish plants every square foot or so and then they grow into big 4 to 5 foot tall bushy plants covered in a thousand or more flowers each.  I find the early radish flowers tend to be a favorite with bees and so I always make sure to grow some near and often in with my zucchini, squash, pumpkin and melons to help bring in the bees for better pollination.
 
Sahil Budhawani
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Roy Long wrote:Radishes grow at an exponential rate, I would say your radishes are looking great for how long they have been growing.

Keep in mind the 25 to 30 day grow time is based upon a fairly small immature root you can easily allow them to grow and extra 2 or 3 weeks to get a better sized root crop.  You also have to keep in mind that cold overnight lows will slow the growth rate down a bit but when it warms up a bit in a week or two you will see a much faster growth rate.   Radish plants can grow a radish root at an amazingly fast rate of speed.

I have grown a lot of radishes here as they are very cold tolerant and I have always had good luck with them.  I plant mine good and early Jan-February direct seed sow and I am generally collecting radishes by early May and through to early June.  We often still have overnight freezing in April but often warm up considerably in May sometimes up into the 70's and 80's which tends to make my radishes bolt.  About half the years that I plant them I get few radishes to eat.  I learned about 12 years ago that you can allow them to flower and go to seed and then collect basket fulls of the seed pods from them and eat those instead of the radishes.  Not only do they make a very pretty addition to your garden with lots and lots of showy flowers the little seed pods are quite tasty.

The seed pods are kind of like a snow pea/stringless green bean in texture with a mild sweet peppery radish flavor to them.  They are a very popular bar snack in Germany which is where I learned about the idea originally.  I like the fact that I can literally get a small basket full per plant rather than just one singular small radish root.  Anymore I eat most of them as radishes and then I leave a couple radish plants every square foot or so and then they grow into big 4 to 5 foot tall bushy plants covered in a thousand or more flowers each.  I find the early radish flowers tend to be a favorite with bees and so I always make sure to grow some near and often in with my zucchini, squash, pumpkin and melons to help bring in the bees for better pollination.



Thank you so much Roy. This is really helpful information. Will definitely try out those seed pods. Excited!
 
Roy Long
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Thought I might should show some pictures of the radishes flowering... These are from the small crop that I had going my main garden last year.

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Jen Fulkerson
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Just to clarify my last post.  I was trying to say in cool weather the reddish Will grow slower, but taste much better.  They grow faster in warm weather, and taste good. They grow well in hot weather, but are hot and don't taste good.  Sorry if I wasn't clear before.  
Good luck, I am sure you will have wonderful reddish soon.
 
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They look fine to me. Perhaps they didn't watch the same video you did?
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