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Jars still bubbling after 3 hours?

 
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I just canned up some ground turkey. It's been 3 hours and the jars are still bubbling!

I've been canning since 2016 and don't recall the jars ever bubbling that long.

I'm sure the food is fine. But why 3 hours plus?

I canned some par boiled chicken I cubed up in that same canner load and those stopped bubbling probably about 45 minutes later.
 
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I'm new here and to food preservation. Did you pressure can or water bathe? Thanks
 
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Do you mean bubbling like it's boiling, or the odd bubbles coming up?  Apparently because of the vacuum, boiling happens at a lower temperature, so if the jars are still very warm they could be still boiling inside?  I saw a post about this topic somewhere else - also happened to be about turkey, not sure if that has anything to do with it.  It must be taking a really long time for them to cool... do you have a thermometer gun, or stick-on thermometer, I'm curious what the actual temperature is if they are really still boiling.  

Rebecca - you have to pressure can meat.
 
Rebecca Crone
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Thanks for the clarification!
 
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I just had the same issue with canning beef. It was my first time. The jars weren't that hot to the touch but two out of three jars wouldn't stop bubbling. I thought I did something wrong and opened them. The seals were good. From what I have read its ok for turkey to bubble for hours, I'm hoping beef is the same. But on the bright side. I made the best beef stew ever!!
 
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New member here, but I do understand this question. Water can boil at any temperature depending on the pressure on it. At 15 psi, it boils at 240*F, at sea level where the atmospheric psi is 14.7, it boils at 212*F, and inside a canning jar, as it cools, at room temperature when the pressure in the jar is reduced as the steam filling the “empty” space of the jar condenses and lowers the psi. You may remember in some high school chemistry classes, boiling water at room temperature inside a syringe by pulling the plunger out, lowering the psi on the water enough to boil it, or more specifically, some of the water flashes into steam to fill the vaccine created.
 
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I just canned up some ground turkey. It's been 3 hours and the jars are still bubbling!


Yes, that happens often. The turkey inside might be cooling off at a slower rate than what you're used to seeing. As long as you pressure canned it at the rate for your elevation and for 75 mins/pint or 90 mins/quart, it should be fine.

I'm new here and to food preservation. Did you pressure can or water bathe? Thanks


Always, ALWAYS pressure can meat. I've seen new videos where people are water bath canning meats. That is DANGEROUS!!! Botulism cannot be tasted or smelled. Botulism spores are not killed until 240 degrees F. Water bath canning doesn't get up to that temp. It only gets up to 240 degrees under pressure. Please, if you are new to canning remember this: ALWAYS PRESSURE CAN MEAT AND LOW-ACID FOODS. If in doubt, read a recipe that is approved by the USDA. Several can be found at exension office websites or the Blue Ball Canning Book.

New member here, but I do understand this question. Water can boil at any temperature depending on the pressure on it. At 15 psi, it boils at 240*F, at sea level where the atmospheric psi is 14.7, it boils at 212*F, and inside a canning jar, as it cools, at room temperature when the pressure in the jar is reduced as the steam filling the “empty” space of the jar condenses and lowers the psi.  



YES!! Which is why higher elevations require higher psi for canning. Always adjust your canning pressure according to your elevation. That info is easily found online, and often inside your pressure canner's user manual if you have one.
 
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