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Wood Chipper

 
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Years ago I bought a 6hp wood chipper that was actually worse than useless. It jammed on anything more demanding than a leaf.. I recently sprung for a pto chipper ($1500) that, after a few days of use, appears to be worth every penny. It is a BX 42 that is sold by several distributors. Very simple assembly and operation. I hooked it up to my JD 2210. Amazingly,  it is rated for  4 inch limbs, and when I tossed in a 4 inch limb (Hickory).....it chewed it up without issue. So, this week I have been marching through my  various burn piles and making multiple Vermont carts full of mulch.  It is not overly moody at wanting the limbs to be trimmed or straight.  The discharge shute has clogged once when I fed it lots of vines.  That was a very simple clean out.
 
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John,

I have wondered for a long time about those chippers and I am really glad that you decided to test one out for me!  Really, I did not know if the 42 would ever work on a subcompact as I think they are rated for larger tractors (but these ratings are always conservative) as I thought it was too heavy for the 3pt.  At any rate, good that you could find one!  

I have had my share of problems with underpowered chippers before so I am not surprised that your older chipper bellyached at even modest sticks.  Also, it is good to hear that the chipper can feed stock as well as the adds suggest.  I am not really in the market for a chipper right now, but if I were, it is good to know that there are some options out there.

Thanks for posting/reviewing, I have seriously wondered about this actual chipper for a long time.

Eric
 
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John, I concur. After a frustrating experience with a small yard chipper, we finally got a WoodMaxx WM8M PTO chipper with similar specs to yours. It was the best decision we've ever made! The only thing my husband has trouble with is vines and wet evergreen branches. Otherwise, that thing is worth it's weight in gold.

We converted the small chipper to a wheat thresher, so it still gets used too.
 
John F Dean
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Hi Eric

While I didn't want to spend the money, my wife pushed for it. She was right.  To get a rental and return it would be a total of 120 miles.  Obviously, I am trying to feed smaller limbs into it,  but it will take the big stuff . Oh yes, on the PTO drive shaft, I didn't have to cut it down.
 
John F Dean
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Hi Leigh,

Was any special alteration needed to convert the small chipper into a thresher?
 
John F Dean
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I do need to add, as with much farm machinery, this chipper could do a great deal of damage to the human body.  I am still in the first week with it, and I check for loose parts at the end of each day. So far, there have been none.  Between the pto power and the 75 pound flywheel, I suspect things could get real exciting real fast.
 
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I used to tie a rope to the pto clutch lever on the tractor so I could shut off the machine from the feeding position.
 
Leigh Tate
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John F Dean wrote:Was any special alteration needed to convert the small chipper into a thresher?


Not really. It was just a matter of connecting the chipper to a 35-gallon drum some rain gutter pieces and duct tape!



 
Eric Hanson
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Leigh,

I love the harvester/thresher contraption you made!

On another note, your chipper has a mechanical intake roller, correct?  I am wondering if it reverses when overfed.  Also, what size material are you chipping?  Do you go all the way up to the 8” max setting?  What tractor are you using?

Sorry for bombarding you with questions, I simply have considered this exact unit before.

Thanks,

Eric
 
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Eric Hanson wrote:Leigh,

I love the harvester/thresher contraption you made!

On another note, your chipper has a mechanical intake roller, correct?  I am wondering if it reverses when overfed.  Also, what size material are you chipping?  Do you go all the way up to the 8” max setting?  What tractor are you using?

Sorry for bombarding you with questions, I simply have considered this exact unit before.

Thanks,

Eric



Eric, the chute pretty much regulates how much can be fed into the chipper. We've never fed 8" branches, mostly 3" to 4". It's not reversible, but the roller pulls them in at it's own pace, so I don't think you could overfeed it. The feeder roller is spring operated and raises and lowers depending on the size of the material. Dry branches are easiest, wet branches clog it, as do vines. Small, tiny branches are a nuisance too, because there isn't enough of them for the feed roller to grab.

Our tractor is a 1961 801 series Ford, very adequate for the job.

My husband really likes this chipper. Besides doing a good job, he finds that the knives are easy to get to and sharpen. No need to send them anywhere.

Highly recommended.



 
Eric Hanson
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Leigh,

Your usage sounds about consistent with what I have come to expect from chippers—their chipping capacity should be about twice that of the average branch being chipped.  When I did my big chipping project, I got a lot of very small, millimeter sized sticks in the pile because they are flexible enough to miss the chipper knives altogether.  This is fine for use as bedding, but does impede and shovel used for moving the material—small price.

Thanks for the specific information!

Eric
 
John F Dean
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As a follow-up, the chipper is still working without issue.  The blades are holding up well.  I remain impressed
 
John F Dean
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I finally figured out how to upload a picture of the thing.
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Agree, in my experience small chippers are not really effective.

Following this thread with great interest.
 
John F Dean
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This is handling anything that can't  be used as firewood.  The blades are still in good shape....I do have an extra set on back order. But the ones I have now are reversible.  
 
Eric Hanson
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John,

Nice looking chipper there!

Eric
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