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Need to attach electric fence to galvanized pipe post - please help

 
eco-innovator & pollinator
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I'm trying to attach electric line to a galvanized pipe post, but having trouble.  I'm afraid the porcelain donut will slip and I can't make it tighter without breaking the attaching wire. Drilling a hole It's a pain in the butt and screwing in a connector doesn't seem to work well without cutting a thread into the pipe?  Suggestions appreciated. Thanks.
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Wrap it in inner tube rubber?
 
pollinator
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a hose clamp probably wont slip and then you could tie wire the plain porcelain insulators to the hose clamp.

if you want to tie them on with just tie wire you have to make a notch or drill a hole or otherwise make some kind of edge to tie the wire to. Also, with the tie wire, going around the pipe many more times and laying the wraps down as flat and as tight as you can also helps.
 
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Most electric fence material companies have a range of attachment system to use. Look at them and see if you can make something yourself.
 
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Wow, those are massively serious ceramic insulators. How much juice are you pushing from the energizer, and how long is the fence?

Here's the cheapskate view, riffing off the suggestions above: put a couple of wraps of free bicycle inner tube around the post (insulation + friction). Then put several tight wraps of your tie wire over the inner tube (compresses the rubber for a good friction fit, and attaches the insulators). Or (farm boy pov) just use the rubber and the tie wire to hold the poly/electric wire; it should be enough unless you're pushing enough juice to light up Chicago.
 
Patrick Freeburger
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I like the hose clamp idea and the bicycle tire may work - I'm worried it would wear out over time.  I found these (in China) which I think is what I am looking for.  What I have now is just what my local Tractor Supply has available, not much of a selection...Thanks everyone, please keep the ideas flowing.
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Hank Waltner
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Douglas Alpenstock wrote:Wow, those are massively serious ceramic insulators. How much juice are you pushing from the energizer, and how long is the fence?

Here's the cheapskate view, riffing off the suggestions above: put a couple of wraps of free bicycle inner tube around the post (insulation + friction). Then put several tight wraps of your tie wire over the inner tube (compresses the rubber for a good friction fit, and attaches the insulators). Or (farm boy pov) just use the rubber and the tie wire to hold the poly/electric wire; it should be enough unless you're pushing enough juice to light up Chicago.



Totally what I meant I just didn’t have time at the moment to write it.
 
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Maybe too futzy but consider this...

You've got a steel fence post there.  You can still build a wood fence on those using adapters.  So .. you could just mount a 2x4 to the steel post, and then all sorts of electric fencing adapters are an option - many of which are less expensive than wire tying ceramics.  Home Depot has "Yardgard Wood Adapter Clamps" for $2.68 ea.
 
Patrick Freeburger
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Eliot, I have a bunch of these - I could make a 4' tall 1"x 2" with the electrical connectors at the right heights on my workbench and then go out and strap them on the poles.

Guys, I like the intertube idea too.  I wonder if my local bike shop has some scrap tubes  they will give me.
 
pollinator
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My go to is put a step in post against the metal post and secure them together with wire, placed at a different level than the fence wire, to avoid shorting. Effectively that adds several insulators for multiple strands. Looks as though your post may be in concrete, so either abandon my idea, or place some sort of spacer between. Maybe a length of 4x4 or landscape timber?
 
Eliot Mason
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T Melville wrote:My go to is put a step in post against the metal post ...Effectively that adds several insulators for multiple strands.



That's a good idea too.  I think you're referring to the style of post that has 5 or 6 built in catches for electric twine or tape?  I'd say it could just be hose clamped to the steel post.

Only problem I see with those step-ins is that they aren't designed to hold any tension ... just to hold the line up and support it.  The little plastic tabs aren't aren't for holding a corner (are they?)
 
T Melville
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Eliot Mason wrote:That's a good idea too.  I think you're referring to the style of post that has 5 or 6 built in catches for electric twine or tape?  I'd say it could just be hose clamped to the steel post.

Only problem I see with those step-ins is that they aren't designed to hold any tension ... just to hold the line up and support it.  The little plastic tabs aren't aren't for holding a corner (are they?)



Yes, those are the ones. And no, they're too flexible to pull much tension against. Good for straight line posts, but not good corners with a tight fence.
 
pollinator
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I assume that is a corner as those are corner connectors so you should have no issue with it slipping down as the tension will hold them up, and the next two posts on either side will also hold it up. but those you will probably have to drill. drill both sides and attach with a bolt if you can't get a screw to stick.
 
Patrick Freeburger
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Everyone - I had some old PT 2x4s so I ripped them in half and drilled holes in them (8 wires first 3 at 6" spacing, then 5 @ 8" spacing).  Then, I hammered an insulator in them.  My U-bolt connectors are too small (so they are backwards).  I was debating keeping it 4' off the ground to minimize termite damage, but this should be OK.  Quick question - Wires (from bottom) 3,5,7 will be negative.  Do they still need the insulator or can they just go through the hole?  Thanks.

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wood on steel pipe
wood on steel pipe
 
Douglas Alpenstock
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Dry wood is an acceptable insulator. Perpetually wet wood less so, meaning some power losses. I guess it depends on your general climate.
 
Patrick Freeburger
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For the Hot (positive) Wires - I was planning to use a plastic insulator, but for the negative (ground) wires - I was going to skip the insulator and wire it directly to the galvanized pipe so it would act as an additional group rod.  I think this would work without leaking current on wet wood when it is raining...
 
Eliot Mason
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The negative wire is nothing more than a ground wire.  Its only there so that in the dry season there is better conductivity.  I suppose if it were full of resistance (bad splices and such) then it wouldn't work well, but I really don't think wood will matter to it.  

In fact, since its a ground wire, you could actually tie the wire to the steel posts - if activated then the current will find the path of least resistance (hopefully via the wire direct back to the charger), but if something has happened with that wire then the charge can merrily find its way through the steel post, earth, grounding rod and then the charger.

And now the internet shall tell me I'm wrong?
 
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