• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Kate Downham

Trailer for Dune 2020

 
pioneer
Posts: 132
Location: South East Kansas
17
trees books cooking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am a big fan of the book Dune. I hope this movie will be good. The trailer came out today. What do you think?
 
pollinator
Posts: 736
Location: Ashhurst New Zealand
194
duck trees chicken cooking wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm a sucker for all things Dune. I'll watch it.
 
master steward
Posts: 8495
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2428
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks cool.  I read the first few Dune books maybe 20 years ago.  I have to admit I don't remember much from the book that aligns with the trailer but that's hopefully due to a failing memory.
 
Posts: 47
14
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Definitely some possibilities there. I hope it's better than the gawdawful 1984 attempt. My brother and I went to see it with high hopes on the day it hit the theaters. Within the first five minutes we looked at each other and said "we've been had".

National Lampoon has a great spoof novel, "Doon". In it, the Litany Against Fear becomes the Litany Against Fun:

"I must not have fun. Fun is the time-killer. Fun is for children, customers and the help. I will forget fun. I will take a pass on it. And while it is going, I will turn a blind eye to it. When fun is gone, there will be nothing. Only I will remain -- I and my will to win. Damn, I'm good!"
 
pollinator
Posts: 252
Location: the mountains of western nc
61
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation cooking wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i’m actually re-reading dune to my wife right now, it’s an old favorite. we’ll probably eventually see this. i’m pretty picky about how people handle well loved stories, so i just hope not to be too badly disappointed.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3559
Location: Toronto, Ontario
486
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh I'll give it a go. I love bad movies.

I feel that people almost always invariably love the first version of whatever story or work is presented. So if you watched the 1984 version first, I have no doubt you might not even see how bad it is. I saw a miniseries version on Canada's Space: The Imagination Station, long before it was bought out by Corus. It was an early-aughts-era made-for-TV miniseries, but I thought it was fantastic.

The best part of David Lynch's version has got to be Captain Picard in a still suit. Right up there with Captain Picard with a battleaxe in Merlin.

I liked the original trilogy of books, but honestly, after the first book, it was a little touch-and-go. I like some of the ideas explored there, and in the newer books by Christopher Herbert, but the scope feels unwieldy. It's worth reading, but it fails to tie everything up in a single graspable comprehension.

Stories and songs originated as ways to pass knowledge before we had the written word. They started off changeable and amorphous; it's only recently that we have become so set in our ways that we object to "covers" of songs that aren't the "originals," whatever that is, or to new versions of stories we've grown up with. Sometimes old stories need to be retold. Sometimes we discover that the world in which we are telling these stories, or the people to whom we are telling them, have changed sufficiently that the stories themselves need reinterpretation.

-CK
 
gardener
Posts: 1636
Location: South of Capricorn
623
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i'm another Dune nut. I read it (and, uh, the whole set of books) every summer, and find new things every time I read it.

I didn't see the 1984 version, just saw the pictures (Sting in a metal speedo!!! *shudder*). I'm a Difficult Customer, that one who constantly yelps "BUT THAT'S NOT HOW IT WAS IN THE BOOK" in the theater and don't watch too many films (I think the last one I saw was the remake of Blade Runner).
I think because Herbert made everything so enormous in the books it was hard to get a grip on- CGI could really make a difference. My kid tells me it looks like the casting is very, very strange, but since I stopped watching TV I have no idea who the vast majority of the actors are, and aside from the guy playing Paul who rather disturbingly resembles my ex-fiance I have no opinions on that front.
I will see it, and probably be disappointed, but who knows, it might actually be decent.  
 
Dc Stewart
Posts: 47
14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I saw a miniseries version on Canada's Space: The Imagination Station, long before it was bought out by Corus. It was an early-aughts-era made-for-TV miniseries, but I thought it was fantastic.



This must be the John Harrison "Frank Herbert's Dune" miniseries made in 2000, followed by a "Children of Dune" miniseries in 2003. My wife and I are watching these right now -- no special coincidence, we're just working through our DVD collection in alphabetical order and it was next on the list.

The miniseries is indeed good. Harrison makes an admirable effort to closely follow the story, Ian McNeice pulls off a suitably creepy Baron Harkonnen and the special effects (although outdated by today's standards) are quite good for the time.

If you're a Patrick Stewart fan like we are, you can go back to the great 1970's BBC miniseries of the "I Claudius" novels and see a much younger Picard sporting curly golden locks as the Sejanus character.
 
T Blankinship
pioneer
Posts: 132
Location: South East Kansas
17
trees books cooking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Dc Stewart wrote:
If you're a Patrick Stewart fan like we are, you can go back to the great 1970's BBC miniseries of the "I Claudius" novels and see a much younger Picard sporting curly golden locks as the Sejanus character.



I just googled that and it is odd to see Patrick Stewart with hair.
 
Posts: 10
Location: Arizona 8a
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am reading Mycelium Running and just read the part where Paul Stamets talks about being friends with Frank Herbert. Pretty cool.
 
Doody calls. I would really rather that it didn't. Comfort me wise and sterile tiny ad:
the best week for a Garden Master course (poor man's poll)
https://permies.com/t/148912/permaculture-projects/week-Garden-Master-poor-man
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic