• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Steve Thorn

Banana Fibre - useful or not for spinning?

 
pioneer
Posts: 144
Location: Gulgong, NSW, Australia (Cold Zone 9B, Hot Zone 6) UTC +10
45
monies cat chicken food preservation cooking bee building solar rocket stoves homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Banana stem can be used for paper making and chopped into mortar or cob.    As it has very long fibres, could it be used for yarn and for spinning?
I suspect that if it can be spun, it would make beautiful stiff fabric to dye and paint for blinds or room dividers , similar to the Japanese dividers.
 
Posts: 264
25
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i do not know about the spin ability but you would want to use varieties like musa textilis or musa basjoo
 
pollinator
Posts: 299
Location: Eilean a' Cheo
103
transportation dog forest garden foraging trees books food preservation woodworking wood heat rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I saw this video via a Facebook ad the other day:

The fibres definately look pretty good, although here they're mainly using them for rugs.
I then got distracted and found a lovely one of traditional Japanese process:

which looks like they ret the stems before extracting the fibre and make quite fine cloth.
There's also a few videos about using the fibres for sanitory pads.
 
master gardener
Posts: 2769
1080
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I use the peels as a sedative tea, so only the stems go to waste, at our house, because I haven't been able to find a use for them, other than compost, or fertilizer. This is an idea I hadn't thought of, but I'll be picking up more, in a day or two, so I'll play with them, and see what works - and doesn't!
 
Posts: 132
Location: South-southeast Texas, technically the "Golden Crescent", zone 9a
66
home care personal care foraging books chicken fiber arts medical herbs writing homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Back in 2013 or so, I picked up a skein of banana fiber yarn that was dyed in blues and greens, was shiny and soft, and was more of a slightly structured roving than anything. I still have it somewhere - I made it into a crocheted scarf, using a larger hook (maybe and H (5 mm) hook and simple pattern.

I learned very quickly that the yarn/roving was heavy and, while beautiful, wasn't very strong. It would break under it's own weight and had to be handled very carefully. The crocheted scarf ending up too heavy to wear, even with just one skein and the lacy pattern involved. I frogged it, then tried a couple of other ideas. It's back to being a PIB until I can figure out what and how to make something with it. I'm thinking about couching it onto a fabric as decoration, or otherwise using it as a bit of "fancy pretty" on something able to back it and keep the stress off of it. It would make a nice edging for a jacket or top or couched onto a simple, not too full skirt.

If you were to be looking for something to do with the fiber, spinning seems doable, but a tighter spin, with less "artistic spinning" would probably be better. It is a heavy fiber, based on my very limited experience, and might be recalcitrant to cooperating.
 
master steward & author
Posts: 23083
Location: Left Coast Canada
6775
3
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would love to play with banana fibre.  I see it popping up all over the place.
Someone keeps promising to bring me some back from the Philippines, but it never happens.  
 
Kristine Keeney
Posts: 132
Location: South-southeast Texas, technically the "Golden Crescent", zone 9a
66
home care personal care foraging books chicken fiber arts medical herbs writing homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

r ranson wrote:I would love to play with banana fibre.  I see it popping up all over the place.
Someone keeps promising to bring me some back from the Philippines, but it never happens.  



I found it stateside. It was probably much more expensive than buying it at the source.

This is very similar to what I have : https://www.darngoodyarn.com/products/banana-fiber-yarn

I probably would choose to buy yarn through a different site, but there are companies that will export and/or ship.
https://www.exporthub.com/banana-fibre-yarn-manufacturers/

This site walks you through processing your own fiber, and dying it.
https://www.allfiberarts.com/2017/spin-flora-banana-fibre.htm

Basically, it's out there, if you want to play with it. I wasn't impressed with the yarn I had/have, but there's been a decent amount of time from my experiment to now. We all know how quickly things can change, so they probably have much better yarn now.
Good luck!
gift
 
The Greenhouse of the Future ebook by Francis Gendron
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic