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Help on proper side wall build for hoop house (livestock)

 
pollinator
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My current buildings are not viable for my expanding sheep flock. I am working with limited income, hence growing the flock. And having the animals pay for their own needs.

My best option seems to be a hoop house from Farmers Friend. I'm in Ohio (think a bit west of Pittsburgh PA). I'm trying to find a location that is not going to be h3ll to level out, far enough from trees/falling limbs, located in a place that won't be a pain to work in and manage all winter, less than half the year, with the sheep in it.

Other than location, I'm stuck in how to properly build walls for the hoop house to be on! I must not have the proper words for Google to tell me what I need. The walls need to be 50 inches tall to allow for cattle panels for separating sheep as needed, and hay bunks. Also allowing enough height for bedding buildup and keeping the sheep off the hoop house itself.

I'm looking at the Gothic style. 50' x 16' also easily allowing 16' cattle panels.

What do I need to consider for sturdy walls that will last and will properly anchor the hoop house? Is there some other name for what I need that I can find some kind of plans?

Thanks all!
 
master pollinator
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Is this the hoop house you mean?  


from here
 
kadence blevins
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Yep that's the one!

I'm excited about the prospect because I will then be able to move the sheep out onto the pastures earlier in the spring, having not been on them all winter, and then have the hoop house for seed starting, possibly some chicken and pig action too. So it will optimize use of it.
 
pollinator
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What's your wind like? putting  a huge sail on top of a wall and expecting it to stay there is going to be a challenge. I feel you will have to extend the tunnels poles all the way to the ground and anchor them there, then build the wall under the tunnel.
Also what kind of system does the tunnel have for attaching the plastic at the bottom? many tunnels just use a trench and that obviously won't work with it perched on top of a wall.


EDIT: OH that's a cat tunnel, they are not designed for all year usage and have NO DOORS or other ventilation the sides are normally just pushed up. the plastic is kept on by being tied to a stake at the end (you can see in the picture) and with rope going over the tunnel which you can also see in the picture. They are designed to be easily moved during the season, I don't think you could possibly put one on a wall.
 
kadence blevins
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I was hoping that wouldn't be the case. *sad face* I looked at all the set up videos and different people's videos of using them. It seemed plausible but I couldn't find anything like what I need.

We have plenty of wind. My idea was to put good solid walls and to build wood end walls.

I'd be very interested in suggestions of other places to look. The farmtek and that sort is so much more expensive and less than half the size. Not even including freight shipping or installation.

I have designed a hoop house type building that would be framed out and use cattle panels for the roof hoop part. And topped with silage tarp. But with rising costs of everything it isn't feasible either. Not without a mysterious rich uncle giving me money *lol*
 
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Try "Ponywalls for hoophouses".
Lots of pallet wall builds out there.
If you are really broke, you can sister pallets together, three tall fir one wall,two tall for the other, with a shed roof in between.
Cover in plastic, cover the plastic in cardboard or carpet.
Use double layers of pallets, offset from each other, for more strength.
 
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I have looked at this setup also. You can get 1 yard concrete blocks from a concrete plant. I though about using four of them for my corners and then tposts a pig panels for the sides.  I thought this could make a smaller greenhouse sturdier for my pigs.
 
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