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Hygiene and Sanitation in Difficult Times…

 
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In one of the last threads, Preparing for a short-term power outage, there were tons of good ideas… but what I missed is what to do about hygiene and sanitation…

I would love to learn from you - your top tips for taking care of hygiene and sanitation during a short-term crisis and even in a long-term disaster.

 
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You mean like if the power goes out you can't take a shower?   An electric water pump issue?  Water heating issues?

Camping shower bags that hold a couple gallons of water are available.  Some can be placed in the sun and heated solarly.  But you have to shower before they cool off, which is sometimes 3:00 in the afternoon, long before quitting time.

Propane for heating water is your best bet because it can be stored for a long time.  A little goes a long ways when heating water.

A wood stove heats water.

A small 200- or 300-gallon water tank up on a 4-foot platform so the water runs out by gravity flow, water hauled inside with large water containers provides household water for several days.  The water should be constantly used and flowed through the tank to keep it clean, not just sit there for months until there's a crisis of some sort.  Keep it potable.

I don't like storing water in plastic containers, like they suggest for earthquake preparedness.  Storing water in those large 5-gallon glass containers that fit on drinking water coolers, covered in dark plastic inside a dark, cool building to keep any algae from forming, changed every few months.







 
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While we were building our house, I set up a "dishwashing stand" outside with a garden hose, two sawhorses, and a couple of wide boards.

It also served as a place to wash our hands, etc.

I didn't bother with hot water but that would have been easy to heat on the camp stove we were using for cooking.

A shower was easy to hand from a limb of a tree.  I take cold showers.

Trash was the biggest problem that took years to learn how to do it right.

All scraps go to the wildlife, I save all glass jars, Paper we burn, and plastic gets taken to town to dispose of.

If anyone wants to set up a "burnable system", this has some good ideas:

https://permies.com/wiki/119012/pep-nest/Set-system-collecting-burnables-PEP

We used a camping porta-potty inside the house.
 
N. Neta
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Anne Miller wrote:We used a camping porta-potty inside the house.


We installed a compost toilet and have a few huge bags of sawdust… although we live in a pine forest, and I think dry pine needles would work too… need to try those…”
 
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