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working with green wood, bodgering, bodging

 
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Location: Was Tenerife, now Scotland
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I don’t know a thing about this. Yesterday I finally managed to sharpen a plane. Just so you know.

But Paul suggested starting a thread on this so I thought I'd learn to start threads. Be very afraid.

Anyway:

The only thing I know about working with green wood is what I've seen in Rex Kruger's videos. He has a series on woodworking for humans - see if that applies to you.

One such video is: https://youtu.be/4YqRoCNHa2k 3 greenwood tools you can make.

Another is https://youtu.be/hqudWoT_jkg the bushcraft vise.

The chest implement in this video is funny but seems to work: https://youtu.be/Xd_ScopY7lQ

Rex has a couple of videos on how to work in the forest. Can't find them now.

I  general, Rex's "woodwork for humans" series is very cool and seems doable.

And thus endeths my very superficial knowledge aboit this.
 
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Location: Japan, zone 9a/b, annual rainfall 2550mm, avg temp 1.5-32 C
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I'm an aspiring bodger.

So far I've made spoons, hafts, handles, stakes, and other tools.

I'm hoping to make chairs and tables and such in the future.

We have a lot of threads on various aspects of green woodworking, not as many on the topic in general.
 
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Location: Cascades of Oregon
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I've always been fascinated by the idea of bodgering. It could probably be a viable craft income stream. It's something I have always associated with England/Scotland/Ireland have never read about bodgers in early colonial times in US.
 
L. Johnson
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This seems like a good place to compile resources on the topic.

First off, the Permaculture Experience according to Paul (PEP) program has a round and green woodworking aspect that has many individual projects and example videos of how they could be done. It's a good place to start looking within the context of permaculture and homesteading.

Here are a smattering of people that I think do great work in the field and their books and videos:

Townsends is a historical channel that mostly does food, but I love his woodworking videos as well. He has a particularly cool pole lathe video and a decent shaving horse video as well.

Ben and Lois Orford do wonderful explanations for green woodworking.

Barn the Spoon has probably become the most famous spoon maker in the English speaking world. He has several books out now, they're on my amazon wishlist.
- Conscious Crafts: Whittling: 20 mindful makes to reconnect head, heart & hands
- Spoon: A Guide to Spoon Carving and the New Wood Culture
- Woodcraft: Master the Art of Green Woodworking with Key Techniques and Inspiring Projects

Ben Law is more of an expert on roundwood and timberframe building but I believe he has some craft/bodgery books as well, maybe this -
- Woodland Craft

Curtis Buchanan is a windsor chair maker who happens to also have posted some of the most informative and educational videos on the topic that I've ever seen, for free! What a generous soul.

I'm probably forgetting quite a few that I've looked at in the past, and I'm sure other members can add lots more.

 
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Location: Fennville MI
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Must not forget Mike Abbott, a major figure in reviving interest in green wood working. Green Woodwork: Working with Wood the Natural Way probably his best known book.
Robin Wood, practically rediscovered pole lathe bowl turning. Also has a line of tools for spoon carving and such.
I’m working toward my own green woodworking teaching space on our homestead in SW MI.

Traditionally bodgers were turning chair legs and spindles, which they sold in bulk to chair makers back in town. Temporary woodland workshops with riving breaks, shaving horses and pole lathes. Probably a pretty precarious way to make a living, but easily romanticized today ;)

I’ve built stools and benches and workbenches and carved a few dozen wooden spoons and spatulas, working from trees felled on our homestead.
Just getting started with my sawmill, which opens up a different realm of working with wood. Milling boards is a much faster process than riving and planing. Very different results and very different sort of work. I really need hearing protection running the mill. Not so much with a friend and riving break ;)
 
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