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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!  RSS feed

 
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Judith: hmm. I wouldn't think so, not with those scoops on it. They look very purposefully designed, and a marlinspike wouldn't need them, would they?  Unless they are for a very specific set of ropes you are messing with. I can't prove it, but I'd say not. I have things like marlinspikes that I use, and I wouldn't want scoops on them.
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Judith: hmm. I wouldn't think so, not with those scoops on it. They look very purposefully designed, and a marlinspike wouldn't need them, would they?  Unless they are for a very specific set of ropes you are messing with. I can't prove it, but I'd say not. I have things like marlinspikes that I use, and I wouldn't want scoops on them.



Yeah, the scoops weren't on any of the marlinspikes...do they go all the way through?  
I do think it is likely something to do with large rope or cable and specialized as you mention.

My only idea was a larding tool but no luck there either.

I hope someone has a clue!
 
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Pearl Sutton
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Swedish Fid being used to splice a rope, the scoops look like they both hold the space open and pass the rope through. Interesting!!
I think that's an apple for Judith!!
It's got to be a special type, but definitely for splicing rope. Yay Judith and Judith's husband!! Apple for him too!
Still wondering exactly what type, if anyone knows....
 
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With renewed interest my mother found a picture of the one we have on pinterest. It was referred to as a marlinspike. No other info though.

Apparently fids are made from wood and metal and marlinspikes are metal only. Appreciate the help in solving the mystery!
 
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John David Johnson wrote:With renewed interest my mother found a picture of the one we have on pinterest. It was referred to as a marlinspike. No other info though.

Apparently fids are made from wood and metal and marlinspikes are metal only. Appreciate the help in solving the mystery!


Tell your mom: apple for her too!! :)
 
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My grandparents have moved out of thier home and into a retirment community, and we've been helping to clean up the house and sort through all the various items. My grandfather stored up a TON of tools (enough that we've filled at least 4 toolboxes full of tools. My kids and I all have our own wrenches, screwdrivers, tape measures, socket sets, etc, all from Grandpa's treasure trove of tools!). I'm going to try to get my parents to take pictures of some of the tools that they can't identify.

In the meantime, though, this was found in the attic. Can anyone say what it is?
IMG_20181127_105308-1-.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20181127_105308-1-.jpg]
side view
IMG_20181127_105312-1-.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20181127_105312-1-.jpg]
Top view
IMG_20181127_105316-1-.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20181127_105316-1-.jpg]
view of the bottom
IMG_20181127_105323-1-.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20181127_105323-1-.jpg]
Another view from the side
 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:My grandparents have moved out of thier home and into a retirment community, and we've been helping to clean up the house and sort through all the various items. My grandfather stored up a TON of tools (enough that we've filled at least 4 toolboxes full of tools. My kids and I all have our own wrenches, screwdrivers, tape measures, socket sets, etc, all from Grandpa's treasure trove of tools!). I'm going to try to get my parents to take pictures of some of the tools that they can't identify.

In the meantime, though, this was found in the attic. Can anyone say what it is?



That looks like a bread toaster - used on gas or wood fired hotplates. We had a very similar looking one with hole-like perforations rather than slots.

 
Nicole Alderman
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Apple for you! You're right! I hadn't known what it was, but my Dad knew instantly (probably because they'd used it camping when he was a child), and a quick google search of "antique campfire toaster" shows lots of pictures of similar objects to this one.
 
F Agricola
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John David Johnson wrote:I have no idea what this is and my family has been trying to figure it out for a long time - solid brass.



To take the guessing a bit further regarding that marlin-spike, I suggest it could be a Naval (military) one – is there a stamp hidden on it somewhere? It may have simply worn-off with use and time.

Here’s why:

• Being made of brass means it was intended for use in a corrosive environment e.g. on a ship rather than near the sea like a shipyard, chandlery, etc.
• Verdigris – the green stuff on brass and copper – is a fungicide and antibacterial. Continual use on wet ropes would protect them to a small degree and, unlike a ferrous metal, wouldn’t leave behind rust particles that damage ropes.
• Importantly, brass does not create a spark. It’s commonly used in potentially explosive environments e.g. gun powder, cordite, etc
• Its size indicates a lot of leverage, so it was probably used on large diameter natural fibre ropes like those used to moor large vessels (hawsers). It wouldn’t be used on cables because brass is too soft.

Additionally, it could be made out of ‘Admiralty Brass’ or ‘Naval Brass’, they have different percentages of copper/zinc and some tin.

The concave section would allow whipcord to be passed through the strands of the rope, or to facilitate splicing.

 
Pearl Sutton
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Nicole:
Both me and my mom knew immediately! We have used them!
We have camped all my life and I used to backpack a lot (until I got very sick :(  )

I have one of these in the garage, it was behind heavy tools, decided to not drag it out for a picture, this pic is off the net

They are sold as campfire popcorn poppers, I use them as a wok type thing over a fire: add oil, veggies, meat, whatever, and you can shake it while it cooks. One of my favorite fire cooking tools. Been known to hook it on my backpack, it's light and really useful if you are planning certain meals.
I have often packed with one of these too, not that nice, and a WHOLE lot older:

I can cook all kinds of things in that.
These things went packing sometimes, less versatile:


Me and my backpacking buddy used to dismay people who packed with us the first time, they'd have dehydrated stew, we had fresh made Indian food... We'd share, but the look on their faces were priceless. Why save the weight in your packs if you don't end up carrying what you want? Me and him loved to eat really well while out, and I am a good cook, and he'd help me carry in good food to cook. He loved waking up to the smell of fresh chai brewing :) If you aren't going for more than a week, it's not a problem, if you plan it well :D
 
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I believe this is a metal contour gauge, if nobody got that one.

-CK

EDIT: Oops, didn't realise this wasn't an entry. Oh well...
 
F Agricola
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Only tip: it's a mid-1960's/early 1970's gizmo:

The-Thing_1-of-3.jpg
[Thumbnail for The-Thing_1-of-3.jpg]
The-Thing_2-of-3.jpg
[Thumbnail for The-Thing_2-of-3.jpg]
The-Thing_3-of-3.jpg
[Thumbnail for The-Thing_3-of-3.jpg]
 
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Hmm ; Well in the last photo, It looks like some kind of bearing in the bottom ...  So i'm thinking its a revolving base .. but for what ?  No more parts and pieces ? That's the whole Monty ? Mid 60's mid 70's were my time, Geez I knew the other ones.
Guess I'll ponder more , possibly until it is revealed...
Fun game
 
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The bearing thing is off center, so it would wobble interestingly if it was spun
 
thomas rubino
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You think Pearl?  I think its centered and the photo is at an angle.  When the cap is on its centered ???  
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:The bearing thing is off center, so it would wobble interestingly if it was spun



2nd Hint: Thomas is correct - the photo is at an angle. I had to do that otherwise it wouldn't have had definition.

And, to get the creative juices pondering some more, there isn't any bearing involved. (That's Hint No.3!)
 
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It's hard to judge size of this one...and because you say 'gizmo' do we assume it does something besides store something?
It looks like a canister that could be in the kitchen so I'm thinking some sort of kitchen appliance storage...although my first thought was a humidor for pipe tobacco...or something to store pipes?  
 
thomas rubino
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Tough one...In the first photo the top is definitely flat. The second photo makes the top look domed, but its flat... the even segments might mean something....   no power cord so it doesn't vibrate.... no bearing so it doesn't spin...
we need a new guesser to move my brain sideways to figure this out.    
Good One F
 
Pearl Sutton
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Ok, if the non-bearing thing is not a bearing, and it has those feet, either it sits on it's feet, or they hold it onto something else, the bearing thing looks like it has notches/groove that would slip over/sit on something, for what purpose I have no clue.
And the body is wood. ...
I'm with Thomas, we need a more wise brain.
My excuse is I was only 7 in 1970 :D Which is no excuse, I tend to know more old stuff than new....
 
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More hints:

• Bigger that a matchbox, smaller than a shoebox
• It stores nothing
• The body is wood coloured metal (quite well done actually), the black top and inside parts are plastic
• The correct orientation is in photo No.1 – black top upwards
• The black nipple on the top has 10 small holes
• The six segments on the top do indeed serve a purpose

Frankly, if anyone guesses this obscure item, they deserve pineapples, coconuts and jackfruit, not apples!
 
Pearl Sutton
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hmmm... Pepper mill?
Tiny holes aren't big enough for decent water or air flow, and that base really looks like it sits on something. Or sprinkles pepper :)

 
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Pepper mill? Geez, someone would definitely want or like a LOT of it - nope, sorry.

Tropical fruit juicer? And the award goes to ... not you - nope, try again.


Clues? Not so helpful ones: It's very lightweight. Ironically, it seems it was made in both Canada and Australia. (It may have been available elsewhere under a different guise.)


[By the way, how long should this guessing continue before it is revealed?]



 
Pearl Sutton
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Oh, give it a while longer :) We are puzzled, not up to frustrated yet :)

A: Is it used in the kitchen?
B: Is it the major part of an item or a minor part of it?
C: Was it for sale in the US or are all us yanks winging it blind? :)
D: Is the interior accessible?
E: Is what might go in it the important part of ID'ing it?
F: Is the interior watertight?
G: Is the interior airtight?
H: Are the odds high we have seen such a thing before, or is it so obscure we would have never even heard of the concept?  (See: Left handed bacon stretcher)

:D
Good puzzle!
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Oh, give it a while longer We are puzzled, not up to frustrated yet

A: Is it used in the kitchen?
B: Is it the major part of an item or a minor part of it?
C: Was it for sale in the US or are all us yanks winging it blind?
D: Is the interior accessible?
E: Is what might go in it the important part of ID'ing it?
F: Is the interior watertight?
G: Is the interior airtight?
H: Are the odds high we have seen such a thing before, or is it so obscure we would have never even heard of the concept?  (See: Left handed bacon stretcher)


Good puzzle!





A. It could be
B. Major
C. Not precisely certain – if we and the Canuck’s had it, you ST’s probably had it years before!
D. Yes – the interior is shown in the photo 3 of 3
E. Yes
F. No
G. No
H. Yes/No – it is obscure but the concept is not unreasonable given the 60’s/70’s 24 hour party people atmosphere, and, the almost Apollo Command Module appearance – coincidence?


A Left Handed Bacon Stretcher? I had to look that one up! We use the left-handed hammer or screwdriver scenario on newbies. Also ask them to go and buy a can of striped paint … cruel, but oh so much fun!
 
Pearl Sutton
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Did you find the left handed bacon stretcher? It's earlier in this thread.

I thought #3 was the bottom, didn't realize it was the inside, oooh, that changes it.
hmmmm
I'll have to think on this.
 
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ice bucket?
 
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Ice crusher?
 
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Incense holder.
 
F Agricola
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Ice Bucket  - I like that thinking, but nah
Ice Crusher - Ditto

Incense Holder - way off, like a bad smell


(Don't who's having more fun with this, gives me the opportunity for silly puns and much more - nobody yet questioned what ST's mean?!)

 
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first cup of coffee thought is something to do with a coconut?

Is the third photo from underneath or inside the canister?
I see it is the inside.

ST's ?  I was born in 1950, am I one?

a daiquiri shaker?
or any mixed drink at the 'bar'?

...but you said those lid divisions were functional?
 
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we once had an apple slicer that was meant to press down on the apple and leave wedges minus the core.

I don't see where the wedges on your lid would be sharp enough or movable in order to wedge up a pineapple that fit down inside?
Is the lid, or the underside of the lid movable?
maybe the three bits in the bottom hold the fruit stationary?
and the tiny holes in the lid would let the air out as one sliced?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Onion storage
Garlic storage

I'm guessing ST's is rude :) Staties would be my interpretation.

So, not airtight, not watertight, and "obscure but the concept is not unreasonable given the 60’s/70’s 24 hour party people atmosphere, and, the almost Apollo Command Module appearance – coincidence?"
What might be partyish, spaceyish, and makes sense to have one.  ... hmmmm
Is it insulated?
Does it get heated? If so by what source?  (doubt it with that lid, but... )
May we have a picture of the inside of the lid?


 
thomas rubino
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I'm leaning towards some kind of fruit thingy.  We haven't seen the bottom of the lid but If it had slicers F would have shown us. (I hope..)
When I saw the "ST" I assumed it meant "states"  
 
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thomas rubino wrote:I'm leaning towards some kind of fruit thingy.  We haven't seen the bottom of the lid but If it had slicers F would have shown us. (I hope..)
When I saw the "ST" I assumed it meant "states"  


I think this picture was the inside of the lid
 
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No, I think that's a top-down view of the top of the lid. The ridges forming a wheel-spoke pattern are structural, to give rigidity to the lid.

-CK
 
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Well, if so that explains why it looks flat when on the base but looks rounded in that photo...   Hmmm  now I'm really thinking its splitting some kind of fruit . The ten little holes would let out air as you pressed down ... maybe... But how is this "space ship" looking....
 
Pearl Sutton
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F Agricola wrote:• The correct orientation is in photo No.1 – black top upwards
• The black nipple on the top has 10 small holes
• The six segments on the top do indeed serve a purpose



Me and my mom are betting there's stuff inside/on the underside of the lid that we have not seen :)

An excellent game!!



 
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I don't know Pearl & mom,  in picture 1) the lid is flat and the little nipple sticks up a bit, in the other it appears flush.
 
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