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rocket stove to heat pool water idea, need help!!  RSS feed

 
leee Davis
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hello all, new to the forum here. I am interested in building a rocket stove using a 50gal steel drum to use to heat water via copper tube. I am very interested in the rocket stove idea because it doesn't put out smoke, where as a wood stove would. I live in the city so the least amount of smoke = less hassles with neighbors etc. i was thinking of using a 6" galvanized tee (ducting) for the feed/draw and on the inside use a 6" elbow to short 6" pipe on the inside to run near to the top, then at the bottom come back out with a elbow to a tall length of pipe. I've seen a few like this, and was wondering where exactly is the heat. i was thinking of two ways of running the pipe. First way is to make the 6" pipe on the inside to go about halfway up the barrel and then with a few inches above that mount a sheet of metal and lay a coil of copper on top with the lid still on so its in between. the other way i was thinking was to run the 6" pipe a few good inches from the top, elbow at bottom with a exhaust at the bottom, and run the copper around the inside of the barrel so its not in direct heat if the flame but getting i would presume the heat still coming from the inside pipe.

So i guess my question or questions would be is, which would be more efficient as to heating the coil of copper?
I have looked and really have not come across anything that someone has posted doing something like this and the steps they did to do it, so if anyone knows any if you could post it please and thank you.

Thanks for your time.
 
allen lumley
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leee Davis : Welcome to Permies, be sure to take the time to look at All the other forums, we are a very Diverse Group, or Motley Crew if you will .
At the bottom of every page be sure to check out the 'similar threads (others have visited )'!

Please go to 'rocketstoves.com' to download your PDF copy $15.oo of Ianto Evans' great book 'rocket mass heaters' there is no other com-
-parable source for rocket stove information in any language (and I don't make a nickel )!

After you have had a chance to read up on rocket stoves you will know what we mean when we talk about - Feed Tubes, Burn Tunnels, and Heat
Risers, and how they make up a 'Rocket Stove', and can be made by a dedicated scrounger for $100, or less.

In the meantime you could go to youtube.com and type web4deb into the youtube search engine, and then scroll down to the Rocket Stove playlist
while this system is not ideal for what you want, it will show you a system type that can be used with out blowing yourself up, what we call BOOM -
SQUISH ! Think about what happened in Boston !!!

For the good of the Craft, Be Safe, Keep Warm, PYROmagically - Big AL

 
leee Davis
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well thanks for the answering. i do my homework before i do things to make sure i do it right. i was hoping for more of answer on where to put a copper coil on a steel drum rocket stove to obtain the most heat without going overboard. this is a diagram i've seen and from some you tube posts that i am basing my idea off. diagram of basic idea . i do not want to put the copper coil in direct contact of the fire, hence why i am looking to find out where else to put it, like the top cover of the barrel, or in between the barrel and the chimney.
 
Adam Poddepie
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For the best heat transfer, inside the drum but outside the chimney. I do think that for the best life of the copper tubing and your overall stove, the tubing should be outside of the drum and attached to it (pressed up against it nice and tight). This way you'll get lots of heat (more for every time you go around the barrel) and you wont have to cut any holes in the drum. Also, if you put the tubing inside the drum you'll have moisture collecting on the coils. This in turn will turn into carbonic acid, which will drip down the coils and into the rest of your rig. You will naturally have this happening even without the coils, but that would only speed things up.

You could also make a spiral of tubing directly on top of the drum as that's the hottest area (It just requires tighter coils, so me being the lazy guy I am I'd probably just stick with the sides).

Lots of designs put the coils inside with the combustion, I just like to have things where I can see them, fix them, and know what's going on. Best of luck!
 
Frere Daran
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Location: Spain
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About a year back, I posted a note about producing hot water by extracting heat from the thermal mass (below boiling temp) instead of the stove itself (boom-squish style). The idea is to make the system more simple, robust, safe and stable, all because of the much lower and stable temperatures in the thermal mass.
You don't get instant hot water, but then you also don't risk blowing your house up...
Link to my post: http://www.permies.com/t/22031/rocket-stoves/Quick-Easy-Rocket-Stove-Hot
 
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