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leasing land for hunting

 
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it occurs to me that if you had a large piece of property then leasing land to hunters could be a viable source of income or at least something that could help offset the cost of the land. deer hunting is a serious sport around here for many people. many business even shut down during deer season. from the people I have talked to  most of those hunters appear to utilize privately leased land to do their hunting. places are set up with primitive cabins and permanent sturdy deer stands.  what do you figure are some of the pros and cons of leasing land for this purpose?
 
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that happens here on the mountains sides, though i don't know if the land is private or of the villages, there is a lot of common land here. Both i suppose.
        It means the wild plants grow there. One part of the Australians, bill mollison and David holgren and Geoff lawton etc  permaculture plan is to have one bit of your land as wild land that you don't interfere with, enter but respectfully.
       The writer and university professor says Juan Ora de la Rueda y Salguero, whose book on trees teaches you the traditional uses of trees  and of their habitat  says that on the mountain sidesntype those used for huniting or combined hunting and grazing slopes that can look barish you can make a lot of money if you take into account the amounts earned not just grazing but with with fungus and hunting and such. agri rose macaskie.
 
              
Posts: 133
Location: West Iowa
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Probably would have to look into liability insurance and make sure it covers accidents if hunters pay money.  I know alot of states prevent landowner from being liable if they grant free access for recreational purposes, such as fishing, hunting, etc.
 
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Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
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I cannot help but think that the amount of money you could be paid would be small.

BUT!  I do remember reading something about somebody that raised pigs and kept them very feral.  Then people would pay to hunt the pigs.  My impression was that they made really good money doing this.



 
Posts: 488
Location: Foothills north of L.A., zone 9ish mediterranean
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Instead of cash, you ask the hunters to stock your freezer.
 
gardener
Posts: 1551
Location: Cascades of Oregon
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Common practice in the South for hunting clubs to lease land. 
 
                    
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This sounds like it could work if you got the marketing right.
 
Posts: 1206
Location: Alaska
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It would work in the deep south, in the rest of the country there is an excess of deer and a shortage of hunters.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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around here the amish make these tiny little cabins that they haul on trailers ..the cabins are complete and have windows and a front porch on them..(suppose i could build my own)

i was thinking that say a half a dozen of these rustic cabins..put in small clearings in our woods..with some trees and shrubs between them to keep them private..and some pit privvies nearby...might be rentable as privitive camping cabins in our rear woods / field area...for hunting or camping..we are very closes to state land so we would require that the people not HUNT on our property, but maybe rent the cabins out as a hunting camp..

this was a thought of something we could do when i begin to get social security..one years worth of social security would buy a few of those cabins..and we could furnish them with tables chairs and cots etc from some salvage type stores..and then rent them out by the weekend?

it is a thought we have been tossing around..would be nice to have some extra $ coming in from somewhere..it would just be a matter of running the brushog around a few times to keep the road open in the sumemr time and to keep lawns enough for each cabin..and then running the tractor in hunting season if there was enough snow to lmit access..as we could easily build a road to the area ..we have roads now going through  our fields to fairly near the woodsy area..

we also would have a pond nearby that could be acessed for recreation possibly in the future..but not sure about that..still thinking
 
                    
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I see those "tiny little cabins that they haul on trailers ..the cabins are complete and have windows and a front porch on them" around here used for hunting cabins too.
 
Posts: 200
Location: Augusta,Ks
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I will preface this by saying that I am a hunter, and not a fan of leased land. I am a single father and can not justify paying to hunt. In KS there is very little public land, so if I was not fortunate and had a few places to hunt, I would just have to quit doing something I dearly love.

In Europe hunting has only been enjoyed by the rich for several generations, and we are headed in that direction here. It is not something I will readily endorse.

With that said, there is huge amounts of money available to people willing to lease their land. Keep in mind that some people will feel they own your land, and treat it terribly. Rutted roads and fields, beer cans and trash, broken fences etc... are just a few of things I have heard about. You will also not have your land available for your use during deer season, and will need to plant crops for deer usage instead of your own.

As I said, lots of money to be made, but it's not just a matter of hanging out a "for lease" sign and taking people's money.
 
                  
Posts: 59
Location: NW Ontario
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I'm not sure about leasing but there are many outfitters around here that provide lodging and guided hunts for those willing to pay for it... This time of year there's no shortage of Americans driving through on their way to hunt bear, deer or moose and the outfitters make a lot of money off of them. If you had the experience to guide maybe a bed & breakfast plus guided hunt could bring in some money too.
 
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Texas (which I think is rather under-used by Permaculturistas) is a tremendous place to lease land for hunting, in fact a sizeable portion of Texas' income is hunting-related.Goodness--one doesnt just lease to anyone, its a relationship that needs to be carefully built..you want to interview them face to face, ask about their experience, set down the rules, no alcohol is a good one, no trash, no fires, emphasise minimal impact hunting. Know if they will be cutting branches for cover. Know your local game laws, the difference between game animals and non-game animals. Insist on having a working cell phone number for at least one person in the group, they must announce when they arrive and when they leave even by voicemail, time in and time out.  Use hunters to supress predation by coyotes and bobcats, a VERY good thing of if you have sheep or goats in nearly any portion of the USA. Regarding releasing of feral hogs--that is asking for an ecological nightmare as well as very unhappy neighbors. But if you have alot of land, releasing a TRIO only of Texas Dall sheep or Barbary sheep could make for a nice little income......also bowhunters are less noisy and in my opinon more careful hunters in general..they have to get close to game..be stealthier..no such thing as a boysterous bowhunter.........just a thought....
 
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