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Plant lists?

 
Posts: 3
Location: SE OK on the border of zones 7/8
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Are there any lists by zones for food forests? I'm very new to this, anxious to get started, but having a hard time figuring out what plants to use. I know the food bushes and trees that I want in the system. It's the nitrogen fixers, chop & drop, etc. that I am having trouble figuring out.
 
Posts: 1444
Location: Fennville MI
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This is one of those times where sharing your location in your profile helps others to help you;)

In my case, I am looking at cool temperate climates, and Eric Toensmeier has helpful information, both on his own and in the two volume food forest work he did with Dave Jacke. Martin Crawford has a food forest book with very helpful information, and nicely arranged. I have found that, so far, crawfrod's work has had the most accessible format, with information well organized and cross referenced, such that it is easy to see which nitrogen fixers are good for chop and drop, or make good forage, or both.

If I were going to make a somewhat blind suggestion, it would be Martin Crawford's book.
 
gardener
Posts: 957
Location: Ohio, USA
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I searched the Plants Database (advanced search) and this is what I got:
Scientific Name
Albizia julibrissin
Alnus maritima
Alnus serrulata
Amorpha canescens
Amorpha fruticosa
Caesalpinia gilliesii
Catalpa speciosa
Ceanothus americanus
Cercocarpus montanus
Dalea formosa
Elaeagnus angustifolia
Gymnocladus dioicus
Phragmites australis
Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa
Robinia pseudoacacia

I searched for nitrogen fixers for Oklahoma.

Hope that helps!
 
pollinator
Posts: 2441
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
154
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Dutch Clover, autumn olive, goumi, silverberrry, adler.
Everything in the onion family (garlic, leeks, chives, etc),
Daikon radish
 
gardener
Posts: 787
Location: NE Oklahoma zone 7a
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For oklahoma redbuds, locusts, and mimosa are all good legume trees that can be found for free. Other local power house trees (chop and drop) are mulberrys and hackberry. I have a catalpa too that has a lot of leaf litter to contribute in the fall. All those trees will require little or no care. On the ground I have great luck with red and white clover, plantains, dead nettle (flower first in spring so aids in peach pollination), mints, wild lettuces, bulbs like crocus and daffodil. SE ok is higher altitude in some spots, so you may be in a microclimate of some kind.
 
gardener & author
Posts: 612
Location: Equatorial tropics
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Since you asked for lists for differing zones, here's a cheatsheet I created for Florida food forests in zone 8/9.

FloridaFoodForestCheatsheet.jpg
[Thumbnail for FloridaFoodForestCheatsheet.jpg]
 
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
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Hello Everyone

I am working on a design compiling lists of plants as well, I am in zone 6a. The usda plant database was confusing. Hoping somebody can point me in the right direction. I have done some research already and I will reply again with what I have so far.

cheers
Jeremy
 
Jeremy martin
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
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Hello again

Forgot to mention I really like the list you compiled David.

Also wanted to share this post for people in cool temperate climates by Eric Toensmeier who Peter mentioned.

http://permaculturenews.org/2014/04/08/spring-season-perennial-vegetables-cold-climate-garden/

also im looking at the farmers almanac website http://www.almanac.com/plant/asparagus

cheers
Jeremy
 
Posts: 27
Location: South Georgia Zone 8b
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David Goodman wrote:Since you asked for lists for differing zones, here's a cheatsheet I created for Florida food forests in zone 8/9.



I think I'm missing something. Do you have a link that has this as a document instead of an image? I would love to add some of it to my personal list that I am making.
 
The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers: http://richsoil.com/cards
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