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Anyone grow Mulberry?

 
pollinator
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Marty Mitchell wrote:Looks like they love ultra compacted clay!



They thrive on neglect. It’s why they’re such a wonderful tree!

All the berries on my dwarf everbearing black mulberry shrivelled and died. It’s very neglected because it’s in the same hole as a tough established rose plant and surrounded by grass. But my regular English mulberry fruit are getting juicer by the day, even though it’s planted in the same spot as a huge tough tree stump that hasn’t yet died
 
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Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
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We had a large 30+ year old Mulberry tree in the suburban backyard in Sydney (so-called Temperate) that was a seedling taken from a tree on my Grandparents farm. (Subtropics). At some stage in its life, it split to form a fantastic climbing tree for us kids, and shaded the chook pen.

Unfortunately, it decided to collapse during a storm one year and that was that.

It was a prolific cropper of huge black fruit. We ate them straight off the tree, gave them to friends and neighbours. The chooks ate so many their eggshells were coloured mauve! Mum made stewed fruit, pies and jam from them. Consequently, I usually give them a miss these days - ate too many as a kid.

Time rolls on, I purchased the Grandparents farm so now have the original tree, which is almost 100 years old and still producing lots of fruit.

However, the tree will need to be relocated/removed so a new shed can be constructed. I don't know if a mature tree of that size will transplant well - will need to take several seedlings beforehand just in case.

They do prosper on neglect - zero fertiliser and irrigation, so may be tough enough to survive it as long as it is managed correctly.
 
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Deb Stephens wrote:Those thread-like things coming off the individual fruits are just the styles leftover from the super tiny flowers. Mulberries form catkins with each individual flower composed of a calyx with 4 sepals. They don't actually have petals like most flowers. So that is what you are seeing--not bugs or worms, but flower parts. Enjoy them, they're delicious!



Pretty sure I know what you’re talking about though it’s been a while. But if I remember correctly, ours “wiggled”....
 
pollinator
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Location: Zone 9A, 45S 168E, 329m Queenstown, NZ
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Dennis Bangham wrote:

I found out that Mulberry Leaves have some melatonin.  What other ingredients do you add?  I may make some extractions.
thanks



There is only one other ingredient, black beans that have a green centre, I have no idea of the varietal name.
 
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Terri Pine wrote:As I understand it, red mulberries and white mulberries are both native and highly resistant to popcorn disease.  However, they hybridize vigorously, and the hybrids are supposed to be (mostly) susceptible to popcorn disease.  Also, a lot of nurseries sell hybrids without saying so.  I have a whole line of mulberries and would like to hear feedback on this topic.




i only read silk hope is resistant to popcorn disease compared to other morus alba varieties. do you have an update on your mulberries?

i grow several types of mulberries. im testing to see which has least dieback and disease for my PNW zone 8b.
 
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Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
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Alex Arn wrote:

James Landreth wrote:

Alex Arn wrote:My grandmother's farm in northern Missouri had quite a few of them.  Does anyone know varietals that will work in zone 3b?



If any would do it it would be Northrop (sometimes spelled Northrup). I believe it's good to zone 3. That's its rating but I would definitely protect it when young

https://www.treepeony.com/products/northrop-mulberry


Thanks for the tip.  Ill plant some next spring.

Trader mulberry is another one thats z3 hardy. comes from N.D. i have one coming in the spring. bought and planted northrop last spring. came to me as a nice 5ft. tree with 2 small berries already on it.
 
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Location: Cowlitz County Washington
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I love mulberry and will be planting many! Anyone here in southwest Washington?
 
master steward & author
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Just about time for me to coppice my mulberries.  I'm going to coppice them this year, then pollard them after that so that the main buds are out of reach of the geese who love chewing them in the spring.
 
pollinator
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I planted over 30 Mulberry trees around my property this weekend. Illinois Everbearing, Silk hope, red and white varieities....MMMMMulberry!
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