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screw type log splitter

 
R Scott
Posts: 3306
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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They aren't exactly safe by modern nanny-state standards, but they are about the best (if not only) way to split really knotty knarly wood.

My Gransfors maul is still faster than a hydraulic splitter on straight grain, but I simply cannot get through some wood and my only option is to cut it into smaller pieces with the chainsaw.
 
David Rea
Posts: 7
Location: Mayne Island, BC
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Here's an interesting option. Looks quite safe, if not particularly fast.
 
Chris McLeod
Posts: 49
Location: Cherokee, Victoria, Australia
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Hello all. I use an electric 9 tonne wood splitter which is powered by my off grid solar power system. The logs here are local timber - messmate (eucalyptus obliqua) - and the timber is 650kg/m^3. This is one tough hardwood and the little splitter does the job easily and powered by the sun to boot. I wouldn't use a PTO powered splitter as it could seriously injure you. Regards. Chris
 
M Foti
Posts: 170
Location: western n.c.
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My big issue with log splitters is how slow they are, in GOOD wood a nice splitting axe will run circles around them, and all the picking up and adjusting of logs just adds to it... I do REALLY like the star bit type of splitting heads though, that would definitely shift the time thing in their favor. However.... I've always been partial to these, partly because they're fast and partly because I'm crazy (I set myself on fire for money as a fire entertainer as well)


 
R Scott
Posts: 3306
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Here is one Paul could run from the solar trailer: http://www.woodsplitter.net/


 
paul wheaton
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Posts: 20455
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 20455
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
 
Devin Lavign
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Location: Pac Northwest
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While a lot of these aren't really for the home firewood cutter it makes for some fun watching to see what is out there.



While he wasn't able to get this running, it is an interesting look at an old solution to splitting. Basically a bunch of axe heads on a wheel belt driven.



I like this design using the hydraulics both ways, but sadly the website link is no longer working so guess they weren't able to stay in business?



And while not a powered splitter, this I think is worth mentioning as something possibly more realistic for more people. It is a splitter I have been looking at as a possible way to make splitting easier and less strenuous a task than using a maul but not have to rely on electric or fueled splitter or the slow manual hydraulic jack splitters. While not cheap at $300ish range a lot cheaper than most hydraulic or powered splitters.



Here is a decent review of the Splitz-All



Of course the log retention system is not limited to Splitz-All. Their split assist concept is something folks have been doing with axes for awhile in various different ways. As can be seen with these videos


 
Mike Jay
Posts: 372
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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A few of those in the first video looked a bit sketchy but they must work. 

I agree with the second to last video regarding the Fiskars X27.  It's an awesome splitting axe.

I also endorse the tire method of the last guy.  My hand splitting got twice as fast and three times as fun when I finally spent 20 minutes to mount a tire on my block and started using my Fiskars axe.  FYI, if you do the tire trick, try to mount it above the chopping block about 6".  That way the center of the piece of firewood is even with the tire and it's less likely to flip out.  Plus it leaves room for the chips/bark to escape and not get stuck on top of the chopping block.
 
Have you seen Paul's rant on CFLs?
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