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! keyhole garden in summer drought  RSS feed

 
r ranson
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This rain star is from a station qute close to me.  Because of the hills and valleys, I'm actually two microclimates away and on the border of two others. Three microclimates intersect about where my house is, depending on the time of year which is great when we invite people over and show them how much it's raining out the back window, dress them up in big rain clothes, get the umbrella ready, and send them out the front door where it's sunny and hot.  Spring and fall are great for this, especially April. 



I think the measurements are in millimetres.  We get quite a bit less rain than that station in the summer and a little bit more in the winter.  For example, we usually miss the August and June rain and April is often wetter here than there, but it's enough to give a general theme. 

Last killing frost is usually before April 16, First killing frost, late Oct.  Warm enough to direct seed summer veg, last week of May.  Usual last day of rain, April 30th. 

It doesn't get very humid here in the summer, but being on the coast, we do usually cool down at night.  Even in the summer, on a usual summer, we can get 30C in the day, but often about 10 or 15 at night.  It's lovely. It also makes for a really good dew in the summer. 

I like the idea of building my next one out of rocks to see if it can capture the dew but the rocks here don't stack very well.  I wonder if I lean the walls in 5 degrees or so, if the soil would support it. 
 
r ranson
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One month later, interesting results.

The day I finished it was the start of an exceptionally hot and dry period which lasted about three weeks.  It's so hot and dry that the radio and papers are interviewing some of the local organic farmers who say it's the dryest we've had since the 1940s.  Funny thing memory, as I think it's actually pretty moist this year.  Winter lasted until the second week of June and we had more winter rain than normal.  The trees are still showing vigor to indicate there's soil moisture.  We're still getting overnight dew which is usually gone by now, and the .07mm of rainfall we had in July, is .07mm higher than the average for the month. However, there is a much higher demand on the water system which in some areas have strong water restrictions as they are either running out or their filtration system can't keep up with the demand.   But the heat was very drying. 

The seeds I planted failed because I didn't keep the soil surface moist.  The leeks I transplanted died because I didn't keep the soil surface moist and I think that the soil is a bit rich for them.  The Good King Henery is thriving!  Nice deep, quick growing roots.  The walking onions are finally starting to grow.  They were dormant when I put them in there.  Some peas are growing through the wattle walls, but the chickens quickly eat them.  I started some kale, Brussel sprouts, komatsuna, and chard inside, and transplanted the starts out last week and watered them in.  I think they quickly got their roots into the moist level.  All but one are doing well. 

I'm pouring about two gallons of mucky (from washing out the animal's buckets) water in the compost every two days.  This is more than I wanted to need, but I think because of the heat and not getting thing moist enough when I built it, it's necessary.  The compost bin is flurting with full.  I think it will be at maximum capastiy by fall. 
 
r ranson
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The wind took the shade cloth from the garden and the chickens discovered the delicious veggies who were thriving up to that point.  Now only the Good King Henery and a few of the walking onions are left... sigh. 

Time to grow more transplants. 
 
r ranson
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I found an old sweet potato in the back of the cupboard.  Lovely long shoots on it, too weird looking even for me to eat.  So I put it in the chicken ravaged half of the keyhole garden. 

Thankfully, they only destroyed half the plants, so I still have half left.  That's a small comfort. 
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Usually, I avoid mulch as in our climate, it reduces dew collection in the summer
  Perhaps this is so where you live, but I think that in general dew collects on the surface of things and mulch, like the hay mulch I use, collects a massive amount of dew because of the huge surface area of all the individual strands.  Dry leaf mulch (particularly with leaves not chopped) on the other hand, will only collect some dew on the upper surface, and this collected dew will quickly evaporate. I find that when we had extended drought the deeper the mulch, the more the soil surface held moisture, and the more dew the mulch seemed to hold (by observing relative dampness on different mulched areas).  Where I live, though, the air is often cool at night from the mountains draining cold air, and the warm beds natural condense a lot of moisture.  So it might have something to do with the type of mulch you experimented with, or your relative day to night temperatures.  Definitely it's a climate based thing, but I'm surprised by your assertion that mulch reduces dew collection.  It is often used by geoff lawton in desert designs partly for this reason.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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oh... now that's an idea.  I wonder how I can incorporate that into the next garden.  It would be pretty easy if I used an old plastic compost bin, but natural materials?  Not sure. Something to think about.  
  You could weave an arch around a disk of firewood that sort of acts as a plug/door that just gets pulled out of the arch or placed in the arch.  If it rots, get a new one.  
 
r ranson
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I find that when we had extended drought the deeper the mulch, the more the soil surface held moisture, and the more dew the mulch seemed to hold (by observing relative dampness on different mulched areas). 


This is really neat.  I'm curious, how long is an 'extended drought' for you?

Mulch is really good here for the first month to 6 weeks after the rains stop.  If I can apply it within a day or two of the rains stopping.  If it's applied too early, the plants tend to drown.  The Mediterranian herb garden seems to do the best with chipper mulch.  It's one of the only places I use mulch directly on the plants.  But I do keep trying and observing. 

 
Roberto pokachinni
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An extended drought around here is a few months... nothing like you are dealing with.  With raised beds like the ones you are designing, you will not have drowning plants.  All my beds are raised, and untilled.  Tilling also is a major cause of soil dessication.  I know you too are experimenting with no till methods, so I wont get into details too much, but any soil disturbance whatsoever will decrease soil moisture.  I'm assuming that chipper mulch that you mention is woody material run though a chipper.  (side note:  which chipper do you own, how big of material can it handle, and how much did it cost?) I put that sort of stuff on my path, but my gardens get a mulch made of a lighter material, like straw/hay, which breaks down faster, and provides more habitat for spiders, rove beetles, and worms seems to really appreciate it.  I even have had ground nesting birds nest in my garlic patch.   I find that with mulch, only a small amount of water is needed to keep soil damp, whereas without mulch the wind and sun dessicate the soil surface and this will create a wick that slowly dries the bed from the top down.  With mulch, the bed seems to remain hydrated, and is easy to keep moist with only small additions of water or non at all.  Mulch seems to act differently if it is not deep enough.  Super thin mulch is pretty much useless to me. It dries out, and dries the beds out.  Mulch of three inches or more begins to really have a positive effect, and it keeps the weeds away or very easy to pull.  

I love your experiment, by the way.
 
Jay Angler
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Here are some pictures of my ARK2 bed from the late spring before I planted:
ARK2-buckets.JPG
[Thumbnail for ARK2-buckets.JPG]
 
Jay Angler
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Clearly, posting more than one picture is beyond my ability - sorry!
ARK2-keyhole.JPG
[Thumbnail for ARK2-keyhole.JPG]
 
Jay Angler
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This last one shows the compost barrel with the lid off, and you can see the old wheel rim used to keep the barrel round. The punky wood was about the same height as the first row of buckets, so I'm really hoping that next year it will act like a combination keyhole bed and hugel bed. It isn't anywhere near tall enough to be a self-watering hugelkulture bed, but if the compost makes up for that by keeping it moist during the drought/growing season without significant added water (I expect to water in any transplants at the very least) I will consider it a success.
ARK2-compost-barrel.JPG
[Thumbnail for ARK2-compost-barrel.JPG]
 
r ranson
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The compost bin filled up too fast, so I pruned some trees and built it up.



Fruit tree water shoots like being baskets.  Cottonwood does not.  Too brittle. 
 
r ranson
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Wind blew off the cover, chickens ate nearly everything and scratched out much of the dirt.

That's my winter veg gone.  They were doing so well too.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Oh no!    So sad.  I hate it when a project is going so well and then something like that happens.  Well, at least the infrastructure is in place for the future. 
 
r ranson
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Lost most of my soil too.

This is the worst gardening year ever.  BUT, I checked on the veggies that morning and they were thriving!  I was so excited that it looked like I would have Brussel sprouts for Christmas. 
 
Jay Angler
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OK, I read the frustration and desperation in your writing R Ranson, and I *totally* get it. Get it as in a friend of the family was moving big trailers around for my spouse and took out half my ARK1 bed.
I also agree that it's been a *really* weird weather year and that's affecting gardens all across Canada leaving many frustrated gardeners in its wake.
You are *not* alone, and there are no quick fixes - just hard work and problem solving - and maybe throwing a bit of money at the problem if that's possible.

1. Your large and lovely center composter will be creating "dirt" over the winter and might be good enough for late spring planting. Will you be able to shovel it out through the top? Would one of those clam-shell post-hole diggers help do so?

2. If you can save up some money, Lee Valley Tools make some superb stainless steel clothespins that I use a lot in the garden and they look as if they would help hold your row cover to your frame. (Yes, I also totally get how strong the gusts of wind can be, sometimes springing up out of nowhere.)

3. I absolutely will *not* use the dreaded "S" word regarding the chickens, as I clearly "S" have known that mink could come through in the middle of the afternoon and kill all 4 of my Khaki ducks who were near my garden beyond the patrol area of the geese, but have you considered getting surrounding the bed with 4 feet of ugly chicken wire? I know there are permaculture ways of handling many problems, but when you've got an experimental bed and need to know if you're on a useful track in your ecosystem and for your farm, and if you do it right, you could just leave it in place while the plants are young enough that chickens are a major risk.

These are just suggestions, and only you can decide in the end what to do. I admit that to me, your bed looks gorgeous, but you've just had a major set-back and whatever you decide to do when moving forward from here, you have the right to make that decision. In the meantime, consider hugging those dratted chickens and give them a few worms, as I can't think of anything more likely to bring a smile to my face than watching chickens slurp worms.
 
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