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Venting

 
pollinator
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Lauren, you comment about the wealthy is debt is spot on.
I have a mate who spends all he earns ,plus more.
I have had to say things sometimes to get him to see sense.
But its fruitless. He is driven by ego, its something we have spoken about and he just thinks its important.
 
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Steven Willis wrote:Afternoon Mr. Oswald,

A quick but common misconception corrected. Edison did NOT invent the light bulb. ;o)

Though Thomas Edison is credited as the man who invented the lightbulb, this revolutionary technology was in fact developed by several inventors. It was Edison's innovation of an already existing system and his knack for self promotion that has led to what we "knew" of as the modern light bulb. (Knew because many of the bulbs used today no longer use filaments. An improvement in filaments was Edison's contribution.)

But you are right. I could have tried with religious based communities, except I am not in any way even spiritual so that won't work. Or maybe a vegan based community. Except I am not a vegan. Or perhaps a place where "family" is the most valued thing (family meaning children.) Except I do not want nor do I particularly enjoy children.  

You see where I am going here?

Thousands of intentional communities could be tried perhaps. Except many will not be a good fit. They could be in Europe and I am not ready to leave the country. Many on the ic.org website either do not yet exist or no longer exist. Many just want you to buy into a family community and many are very religious by design. It narrows the choices.

When I say I tried to  make contact with and set up a visit with four, I mean I did my due diligence and narrowed the field on purpose to find the best fit. This isn't throwing spaghetti at the wall. It requires a bit more before you reach out to the communities.

But yes, you and everyone are right that I can just apply to, as you said, to a "thousand" communities until one invites me to visit. Maybe, just maybe it would be something I could come to like one day even if it ends up being a group that is waiting for a comet to pass by the Earth and then catch a ride on a space ship hidden in it's tail?

Thanks for the words of encouragement.



I wish I knew where the vegan communities are, I would fit in. Or even Christian communities, where I might fit in. Or a vegan Christian community, that would sure work too. Or with families included, which would be an environment of people I would value. I might be adaptable to other communities, if they can take in a poor guy like me who would farm all he could for growing any of things for what is needed for food and materials, wanting others involved with that to work and share together.
 
pollinator
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I have a credit card. I buy my gas with it, I pay my health, car and house insurance and my electric bill with it, I use it at the grocery store and the hardware store. A few things like my property taxes and phone bill use third party processers that charge a fee, so I pay them by check. Pretty much everything else goes on the card.

When the bill comes, I can look and see exactly how much I've spent and how much was wasted, where I should cut back. I check off everything and make sure it was charged by the due date of that particular thing. I make sure there is nothing on the bill that shouldn't be. Then I call to see if there are any recent charges not showing on the bill and if so, add it in and send them a check to bring it back to zero.

My fingers cramp up when I write that check each month, because to me it's a lot of money but it covers everything. I think it's easier to know exactly what life in this world is costing that way than if each thing is being paid individually. About the same as keeping a budget except I guess I'm using the card company as a free accountant. I don't even know what the interest rate is because what I pay in interest is zero.

The points are linked to my Amazon account which I use infrequently but most purchases there are free, if the cost exceeds what my points cover, I don't usually buy it.

** I know merchants charge more to cover the bank fees, but I don't think that is per purchase, I think it is just built into the price. I mean if I am using a card and the next person buys the exact same thing with cash, what they pay is the same as what gets charged to my bill. IF I'm wrong about that then it is a huge flaw in my practice, that will have to be addressed immediately! I might go to a store and buy two of the same thing, one with card and one with cash and make sure the receipts match.

I remember when there weren't any credit cards or computers. If you wanted to buy something with OPM you had to go in person and ask to borrow it. I did that a few times, like for a car or a piece of land but I never felt like something bought that way was really mine. People don't seem to understand that now days and the banks seem fine with it, they encourage it. I'm not rich, I could never in a million years, for example, pay for something like a new Cadillac but I could probably walk in a showroom, throw down that card and drive off in one, then pretend for a little while, that it was mine.  

When I was a kid, if I borrowed money from my mom or dad the next time they saw me, even if I just went outside and came back in ten minutes later, the first thing they said was, "where's my money? "don't you owe me some money?" "I think you owe me some money" Good God, it just wasn't worth it. I guess I learned early on that if I spend other people's money, they are going to want it back and I better be damn well sure I have it when they do, because if I don't then what ever I bought with it, isn't mine.


 
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The issue with debt, is not really at the personal level today, its a societal issue.  Rates have been falling since about 1980, which has allowed everyone to be able to afford a home a little easier. that car refinance govt/personal/corporate debt, etc..  At some point the ability to refinance at a lower rate ends and thing correct....  We are very close to that time today, the great reset is needed because of how much debt there is worldwide.  At that point relocalizing food systems and so much more will have to happen, because of financial and energy needs.

 
master gardener
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Hi Lisa,

I would add that not all student loans are created equal.  Read the documents carefully.  Both my wife and I had student loans with waiver clauses.  We used those clauses.

On any loan, examine the entire pay off process in detail .... crunch the numbers.  I was once offered a 30 year home loan with 5% down.   Of course there were various clauses that  added on closing costs, various insurance, etc.  I ran out the loan on paper (pre home computer days).   After 10 years I would have paid virtually nothing on the principle.
 
pollinator
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Which lifestyle is better;

The inlaws that work 80 hr weeks make enough to survive, pay their large loans, buy  expensive organic food, give expensive presents and buy all sorts of gadgets, they don't go on holiday they don't have time.

The other inlaws work 9-5, can afford their mortgage, car, holidays, and have some time to do other things (weekends)

Us both work part time, have no debts, have 1 old car never go on holiday or buy new things, we can't afford it. But we have tons of spare time.

One Brother in Law both work full time have a large mortgage 2 cars on credit, buy food daily (don't even have a freezer) can't afford holidays Have weekends free

Other Brother in Law she works part time, he works long hours for his own firm owns two houses he rents one out, is considering buying a 3rd, no time for holidays but no money issues Has maybe 1 day a week free.


When we were starting out as a couple we bought a stupidly cheap house that no one here would live in, It had a roof, doors, windows, electric, central heating (wood fired) but it was old, low, and without a lot of work with the fire tended to be cold and damp. But it cost 2 years rent. We lived there 5 years and then could afford to buy a better house cash. If we can't afford something we don't buy it, cars are bought cash as soon as we buy one we start saving for the next one, or the next repair bill, we have money in the bank and in cash for emergencies, we buy everything we can in bulk, we swap for some things and network extensively to get things done on a barter system. I have found being an active volanteer for this that and anything in the local area means when you need something like tool hire or a couple of strong backs there are always plenty of people who will help. There's a lot of money to be saved there.

 
John Wibel
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Your way is best, imo, and generally has less stress.
 
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