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a small change in drinking container shape -> cheap housing  RSS feed

 
paul wheaton
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Marilyn Queiroz
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Would you care to describe it? I'm getting
HTTP Status 404 - /Concept/porfolio/06/07ha/B017UB.htm
 
Leah Sattler
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my curiosity is getting the better of me! the link does not work for me either! is this about the milk jug changes? not sure how that would apply to housing...
 
paul wheaton
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Leah Sattler
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wow! the leggo idea is really calling out to me now. I don't know about using it for housing though. I would have trouble wtih being surrounded by all that plastic and would wonder about its affect on the air quality in the home. but their would certainly be many other uses for them.
 
paul wheaton
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I think having a home made of plastic is really great if your current home is made of cardboard and has recently been rained on.

Other than that, yeah, I agree, I would rather not have a plastic home.

 
Leah Sattler
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not a home but...

raised beds

fencing/noise barriers

well ventilated barns/sheds/storage

filled with water they would make great alternatives to wall-o-waters for early starts


and I guess there are people in the world who do have homes made of cardboard that just got rained on so......


 
Susan Monroe
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The problem is that the material is not UV-stabilized and will break down in a year or less.  And the insulative value probably isn't much.

I would rather use straw bales as my waste material.

sue
 
paul wheaton
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Joel Hollingsworth
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This was done with glass bottles many years ago: the Heineken WOBO.  (Efforts usuing standard bottles also pictured in the link.)

http://www.boxvox.net/2009/02/glass-bottle-houses.html

I also think the new Wal*Mart milk gallons show promise for structural and other uses.  Imagine a thermal mass wall in the center of your house, filled with these:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/30/business/30milk.html

One big downside would be where your money goes if you buy them full of milk, but presumably they are being thrown away.  And I realize condnesation on such a wall has to be dealt with, etc.
 
paul wheaton
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The first link is a bit different because then you are mixing cement with the bottles.  I think the interesting thing with the suggested invention is the idea that a structure could be built without any kind of mortar. 

Although, I have to admit, all of the bottle houses I have seen have been really cool looking.  And the big advantage of them over, say, a cordwood structure, is that bottles don't shrink!

In your second link:  it wanted me to sign up and I elected to not sign up ...

 
Joel Hollingsworth
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paul wheaton wrote:it wanted me to sign up and I elected to not sign up ...


Oh, sorry about that.  Oddities with my internet situation mean I don't notice that sort of thing.

The important thing was the image, not the article, and there's a better image here:



They're designed to stack several deep, while full, and without other support.  They don't interlock, but I think that's fine.

BugMeNot is good for registration walls at NYT and other places: there are a rotating group of communal accounts you can use, and the site keeps tabs on which ones still work.

http://www.bugmenot.com/view/nytimes.com

We shouldn't have to use that sort of service, but hopefully using it will cut down publishers' incentive to require registration.
 
Brenda Groth
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uv stabililzed would be a real need..as i have attempted to pick up milk cartons that have been left outside for a few months..they totally disintegrate !! a lot of plastics are made now so that they will break down with exposure..esp milk cartons..they do really fast..

i know we all see the commercials about 100 years in a landfill..but that is only a few plastics..most of them actually are made to break down faster now..and who wants their house to fall down in a couple of years?
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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UV is among the many reasons I think mortar (even just local mud) is a good idea.
 
                          
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not a house but i have seen a garage made of beer cans filled with sand, long time ago but cant remember what was used ar morter

Bird
 
                          
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I read about a bottle house one time and they put the top of the bottle out, and the house nearly drove the pioneer crazy, by the wind whistle on the bottles,

and for some reason I have always wanted to build a whistling tower,  some thing 6 to 10 feet tall with the bottles pointing out so the wind would make it sing,  but put is some where not near the house, so it would not drive me nuts hearing it all the time,
 
Kathleen Sanderson
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Maybe just have a few strategically-placed bottles left pointing out to whistle?  Personally, while I like some sounds, such as the sound of running water, and even wind-chimes, too much noise causes stress and headaches.  The noise of large ventilation systems actually makes me physically ill if I'm in it for too long.  So I'd be pretty conservative with the whistling bottles, I think.

Kathleen
 
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