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List of tree species that grow true to type/parent from seed

 
Michael Longfield
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Location: Southern IL zone 6B
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I'd like to compile a list of trees which grow true to type when planting from seed. Let's try to make it a clean list, in bullet point format. Then this thread can be convenient for others to reference.

-Stone fruits
-peach
-nectarine
-apricot
-almond
-citrus
-lemon
-mango
-pawpaw
 
John Polk
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Apple:
*Antonovka (the only apple I know of with this trait).
 
Neil Layton
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- Hawthorne
- Sweet chestnut
- Moringa
- Elder
- Mayhaw
- Sea buckthorn
- Tilia species (lime, linden, basswood)
- Juniper
- Monkey Puzzle
- Jujube (I think)
- Sumacs
 
Jennifer Brownson
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Location: NE Arizona
forest garden greening the desert trees
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The literature says the following need hot water treatments, but I used to get black locusts volunteering in my garden with no treatment as well.

black locust
Siberian Pea shrub
 
Akiva Silver
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Don't forget juneberry.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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True-to-type seems like a very high standard. In my admitedly seat-of-the-pants estimation, no tree species have been inbred enough to be able to meet that criteria... If the list were relaxed to "Somewhat approximately like it's parent", then perhaps a list could be put together. I wouldn't add any wild fruits to the list, because as far as I can tell there is lots of phenotypical diversity in non-domesticated trees.



 
Michael Longfield
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Location: Southern IL zone 6B
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With the power granted to me as the original poster of this thread I here by relax this list to include "Somewhat approximately true to parent".

I prefer that in a seed anyways. It gives predictability while maintaining genetic diversity. It is what I meant by the original post and should have been more clear. PEACE
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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In my garden, NanKing Cherry seedlings look and grow like their parents. They are sold as seedlings by the nurseries. They are a species that would be highly suitable for a plant breeding project. They bear fruit quickly, so an individual could aspire to accomplish a lot in a lifetime.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Most Fruit bearing trees require cross pollination to produce a crop.
This means that almost no seed from the parent tree's fruit would be true to the parent's flavor or texture as a rule. (Rules usually apply in a broad, general way in the orchardmans world)
The only way I know to make sure you get true to type fruit trees is by grafting.

There are some self pollinators out there and if you only had those trees in your orchard, then you probably would get true to type seeds.
The caveat there is that when these trees are cross pollinated they produce better quantities of fruit which is why every one of these trees bears a "better if planted with another variety" tag when bought from a nursery.

There are some (other than figs) that even when cross pollinated grow very similar "babies" from the seeds. The Arkansas Black Apple, The Golden Delicious, and a few others show this tendency.
Figs do not require pollination to produce figs, when you manage to grow a new tree, they are most always true to type and taste with the parent.
Peaches and nectarines are like the ABA, they tend to be very similar to the parent tree while plums are a hit or miss.
Avocado is another tree that is mostly true to type but texture is the usual variant.

Some citrus can not produce new trees from seed, even though they will have seeds in the fruits. Navel Oranges are a prime example.

Then you have the mango, pawpaw and papaya, which seem to always be very close to the parent type even though they have to be cross pollinated to produce fruit.
 
Jason Silberschneider
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Pistachio
Pecan

In fact, are there any nut trees that won't produce similar nut trees as offspring?
 
Jennifer Brownson
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Location: NE Arizona
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I was just looking at the Bountiful Gardens website (they have been my primary source of seeds over the years), and I noticed that they have a good selection of shrub and tree seeds... the kind of permaculture plants that we have been talking about. That web page is: http://www.bountifulgardens.org/Trees-Shrubs-and-Berries/products/6/

They also have a resource page on what the seeds need to germinate: http://www.bountifulgardens.org/images/Tree_and_Shrub_SEED_GERM_PROCEDURES_01-15-2014.pdf

Here are the varieties they have listed:

Aronia
Bearberry, Uva ursi
Blueberry
Wild Bush Cherry
Carob, St. John’s Bread
Chaste Tree Vitex
Currant
Crampbark
Elderberry
Dead Man’s Fingers
Goji
Hawthorn
Hazelnut (Filbert)
Jujube
Kiwi (Hardy kiwi)
Linden
Moringa
Mulberry
Oregon Grape
Passion flower
Persimmon
Paw paw
American Wild Plum
Quince
Red Root (Deerbrush)
Rugosa Rose
Raspberry, Blackcap
Schizandra
Sea Buckthorn
Serviceberry
Siberian Pea Shrub
 
Victor Johanson
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Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:
In my garden, NanKing Cherry seedlings look and grow like their parents. They are sold as seedlings by the nurseries. They are a species that would be highly suitable for a plant breeding project. They bear fruit quickly, so an individual could aspire to accomplish a lot in a lifetime.


Nankings have been bred in the past, but pretty much all of the cultivars have vanished from the trade. Some may still be available via the USDA germplasm repository, but I haven't checked. Drilea and Orient were two prominent cultivars. I bought a yellow Nanking cherry, and Sandkings are hybrids with Prunus besseyi.
 
And now I present magical permaculture hypno cards. The idea is to give them to people that think all your permaculture babble is crazy talk. And be amazed as they apologize for the past derision, and beg you for your permaculture wisdom. If only there were some sort of consumer based event coming where you could have an excuse to slip them a deck ... richsoil.com/cards
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