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Off with their heads! Keeping big trees short...

 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Ok, I would love some hardy pecan, Chinese chestnut , and or/ other trees that get pretty large, but I don't have the space.
Mulberries apparently respond well enough to being kept shortish, but what about the pecans, chestnuts, and other trees?
 
Glenn Herbert
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Europe and other parts of the world have practiced pollarding for centuries (millennia?), keeping trees at a certain size by repeatedly cutting the branches off at specific points. It has been done with many different species, so I suspect it would work with those you mention. I would search for "pollard" and the species you are interested in to see if there is any specific relevant information.
 
William Bronson
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Thanks for the reply!
Yeah, did just that, came up with bumkiss.
Maybe if I try "pollarding nut trees" as the search terms.
Pollarding seems to be aimed at fuel and small diameter timber, but it's as close as I can get.
Maybe I should research how these trees are grown commercially.
 
David Livingston
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Pollarding is popular where I live in France . Mostly oak trees but not solely Chestnuts are usually stooled not pollarded I dont know why the difference though . I dont think its due to nuts though .
 
Tyler Ludens
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David Livingston
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As I understand Coppicing includes both Pollarding and stooling . Pollarding is cutting the tree about 6 to 12 foot up usually Stooling about 18 inches . Since the authors are talking about making posts and fencing from chestnut I think its fairly safe to assume they are talking about cutting the teree back to the base thus causing long straigh shoots

David
 
William Bronson
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Thanks for the link, and for the new search term. "Stooled" huh?
You permies teach me something new everyday!
 
Crt Jakhel
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When we bought land it came with a large fully grown walnut tree. The next summer it was cut in half by a freak storm that twisted and threw smaller trees around the orchard.

Since then the walnut tree has regrown beautifully. Judging from this I would say that walnuts + heavy pruning, whatever you call it = OK.

Concerning edible chestnuts, I think chinese chestnut is immune to the widespread bacterial disease of chestnuts so unlike castanea sativa, cutting it should not be a problem as far as disease is concerned. Don't know about regrowth.


 
Glenn Herbert
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I have always heard "coppicing" to refer to cutting close to the ground, and "pollarding" as cutting higher up. A coppice stool is a term I have seen. I think it is probably better, unless someone can confirm that coppicing commonly worldwide refers to all forms indiscriminately, to keep the terms separate.
 
Kris Mendoza
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Location: New England USA, Zone 7a
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I came across this article and am trying it with some pear trees:

http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/gardening-techniques/small-fruit-trees-zm0z15onzdel.aspx

 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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So it is still not entirely clear to me that these trees will thrive and produce nuts while being kept short, but the certainly will survive and create timber and fuel.

This site: Mast Producing Trees is full of permie oriented info.
This site: coppiceagroforestry.com is probably where I will find my answer.
 
Ken W Wilson
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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American hazelnuts are already in bush form. Mine only get about 6'.

Chinkapins are small trees.

Carpathian walnuts are a lot smaller than black walnut or pecan.
 
William Bronson
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Yeah, I am planning on chinkapins and hazelnut trees. The chinkapins could be a great niche product, both for oil and meal.
The hazelnuts, I am not sure beyond dig Nutella. I have never had hazelnuts any other way?
Pecans are very healthy and marketable,chestnuts very productive and I found both trees available locally and cheap, so I thought, maybe I could fit them into my postage stamp food forest.
 
Jim Thomas
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Location: SC; Zone 7B
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William Bronson wrote:Thanks for the reply!
Yeah, did just that, came up with bumkiss.
Maybe if I try "pollarding nut trees" as the search terms.
Pollarding seems to be aimed at fuel and small diameter timber, but it's as close as I can get.
Maybe I should research how these trees are grown commercially.


FYI - Its "bupkis". Bumkiss does give a more amusing visual, I grant you.
 
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