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Is this really bee balm? And peppermint?  RSS feed

 
Vera Stewart
Posts: 227
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
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I know I've got it marked as such, but my markers are a bit questionable at times...earlier this pot was filled with seedlings of three or four different species (I used weedy soil to fill it by accident) so I weeded it down to what I think is monarda, but I just want to check with the experts! Thanks.

I also have a pot with what I think is peppermint seedlings, they taste a bit pepperminty, but again, not 100% sure! Thanks for your help.
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Monarda?
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Peppermint?
 
Simone Gar
Posts: 153
Location: Alberta, zone 3
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Peppermint would be "smack in your face" minty And darker leaves. Oh and true peppermint doesn't grow from seed. So maybe spearmint?
For bee balm/monarda the leaves seem too shiny. Mine looks more fuzzy.
 
Jessica Padgham
Posts: 95
Location: Denver, Co 6000ft bentonite clay soil
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Your monarda looks more like amaranth.  The peppermint isn't that but I'm not sure what it might be.
Peppermint
IMG_20160706_135146854
Spearmint
IMG_20160706_135120189
Monarda
IMG_20160706_135207252
 
Vera Stewart
Posts: 227
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
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Oh, great. Now I'm all confused.

 
Crt Jakhel
Posts: 158
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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Are the stalks square? They should be. And the leaf shape is wrong (amaranth is a good idea, yes).
 
Vera Stewart
Posts: 227
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
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Well, as far as I know I've never had amaranth...

Maybe I got the wrong seeds sent to me? I was using a small, new to me supplier, so that could be it. Anyway, I guess I'm going to have to try again to get the plants I wanted!
 
Crt Jakhel
Posts: 158
Location: NE Slovenia, zone 6a
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I don't know what your location is like and whether you have sown the seeds in an open area or indoors. But... In my part of the world amaranth is a persistent weed - field amaranth (amaranthus retroflexus), I think its common name in English is pigweed.

Your young plants don't *have* to be amaranth, possibly there are others that look similar when young, it's just that they seem quite unlikely to be beebalm, or especially mint.
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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The first ones are very like amaranth, whose seeds are also everywhere in my region.  Don't despair.  amaranth leaves are not only edible they are very nutritios.  If you don't like them out of hand, they can be sauteed and make a fine fritatta.

And I concur on the square stems.  Peppermint and monarda, both being members of the mint family should, will have square stems.  I don't know how soon they develop their distinctive smells.  It takes a while from seed to have enough energy to make oils, and the function of the volatile oils is to cool the plant, thus in nurturing environments of perfect temp and humidity we tend to provide for seeds and seedlings, the fragrance may not be there right away.

 
Joy Oasis
Posts: 221
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Second picture seems to be young chickweed seedlings. It is a very nice weed to have, because it is very high in magnesium and other minerals. Domesticated greens we grow can never reach same levels it has. In our climate (zone 10), they grow just in spring, and I always pick them to add to my morning green juice. Their leaves are tiny, so it would be lots of work to prepare them for the salad, but they might work in smoothies too.
  First one is like everyone said, most likely amaranth. Also edible. I grow red variety, and also juice it or feed it to my guinea pigs.
 
Tiffaney Dex
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Peppermint is a sterile hybrid of spearmint and watermint and cannot be started from seed, as a couple of others stated.
 
Robin Katz
Posts: 12
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The first and second picture look like amaranth to me. Note the reddish underside of the leaves.

The third picture looks a little like chickweed but if it's a little minty then probably not. None of the pictures are of a mint as others have pointed out.

Since you bought this from someone, I'd ask for a refund.
 
Vera Stewart
Posts: 227
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
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Thanks, I've complained to the seller.
 
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