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what're your favorite dutch oven recipes?  RSS feed

 
Cassie Langstraat
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MY LIFE IS COMPLETE!


What should I make first? I want to hear all you permies' ideas!



#stuffthatlasts
 
r ranson
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I'm green with envy.  Love the pot!

Do you have any dietary preferences (vegetarian, omnivore, &c) for us to consider or shall we just suggest the recipes we love best?


First recipe - CURRY!

Chickpeas (cooked or from a can), drained. 
Other beans (also cooked and/or can), drained. 
Onions chop them up nice and fine. 
New potatoes (optional)
Meat (optional) or leftover roast beast (optional)
Curry paste you love the most (I like Patak's as it's just so darn delicious and is one of the few brands that I can eat)
Tomatoes chopped or from a tin (optional, but really recommended)
leftovers

Put in pot, mix together, cook on medium to bring to boil, then lowish until cooked through.  Potatoes take the longest.  Cook on stove top or if you have the oven on, stick it in there.  Temperature isn't really a concern, but my preference is to cook it low and for at least two hours.  You can probably cook it in less than half an hour if you leave out the potatoes.

Serve with chutney (here's my favourite) and popadoms.

Eat as a side or main dish.


Okay, so curry doesn't really do that pot justice.  But it makes a good reminder of the great diversity of goodies you can cook in such a lovely pot.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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R Ranson wrote:

Do you have any dietary preferences (vegetarian, omnivore, &c) for us to consider or shall we just suggest the recipes we love best?



Good question. No dietary restrictions for this gal.

 
r ranson
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Roast beast in a pot like this is amazing!

Cheap cut of meat, usually beef
about 1/4 cup of wine, or stock, or beer, or water
onion(s) (skinned and cut in half)
carrot(s) (peeled)
potatoes (peeled)
old veg from the back of the fridge like turnips, celery, whatever is still edible but needs using up because we don't feel like making broth this week.
instant soup mix, spices, or whatever flavours you like best, or salt and pepper.


Brown meat, or not, in the pot on the stove.  Deglaze with wine, if browning meat first, otherwise skip to next step.  Add the other ingredients.  Cook in oven until done (depends on the size of the meat, but usually 1 to 2 hours).

This is handed down from my great-grandmother, via my mother to me.  It's the only recipe I have from that side of the family (except a stew which is basically the same instructions, cooked in the same pot, the same way, with the same ingredients only cut up differently).

Sorry, it's not more specific.  The cut of meat is basically the cheapest roast in the shop.  The veggies release a lot of juice, so there isn't much need for any extra liquid.  You can make a gravy from the drippings if you like.  It's best if cooked low and slow, especially if the roast is low on fat, so I usually cook at 275 for 3 hours for a mid-sized roast.  If there isn't enough fat in the roast (fat makes flavour and tenderness), smother it in bacon.


 
K Putnam
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Congrats!  I got my first one about 11 years ago, still going strong. You can make a lot of meals in a dutch oven in 11 years!   Oh where to start....

Beef stew, Beef and Guinness stew, goulash, all of the many tasty variations on stew...
Pot Roast / Short ribs/ Lamb shanks
Carnitas (google "Diane Kennedy's Carnitas")
Pork braised in milk
Beans, cooked in the oven slowly.
Chicken in a pot!  Chicken in a pot is great!
Chili
Stock, if your pot is big enough

And of course a good sized pot does double duty for preserving tasks like jam, chutneys, crushed tomatoes, and so on. 

And while I wouldn't necessarily do this to your pretty green pot, mine has been outside on the rocket stove cooktop.  A bit of a pain to get the bottom cleaned again, but worth it.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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yayyyyyyy!

thank you so much beautiful people!
 
David Livingston
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Lancashire hot pot is good http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/9099/lancashire-hotpot
Panacaltee - basically layer potato cornbeef and occasional onions  last and first  layer potato fill with gravy cook for ever on low heat .
Any stew with dumplings


David 
 
Cassie Langstraat
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it's been so hot here in CA and I don't have AC in my house so I haven't made anything yet but I will post a picture here when I do!
 
Craig Carter
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The Question is, what can you not cook in one.oh by the way you can make homemade ice cream in them too. It takes a little longer to do but we'll worth the time to do.
 
M. A. Carey
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I make meatloaf in my Dutch oven, pork roast, beef roast, BBQ ribs and then add to Dutch oven until falling off the bone tender, pinto beans and bacon, country style pork ribs and pork steak.  I cook outside using charcoal or coals from firewood.  I have never used my Dutch oven (cast iron) inside yet, but this winter I plan on using on the woodstove.

M.A. Carey
 
elle sagenev
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Beef Bourginoun and Carnitas. To die for!  French onion soup too!
 
Rebecca Norman
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My sister showed me how to make crusty no-knead sourdough in a Dutch oven. It comes out like a gorgeous loaf from a brick oven, all crusty on the outside, and big holes and soft texture on the inside.

Just mix a fairly wet sticky dough of flour, water, and just a little yeast or sourdough starter (less yeast than your normal bread recipe). Just mix it up but don't knead it, and leave it too sticky to knead, anyway. Leave it on the shelf for several hours or overnight. When it has fully risen and looks like a big bubbly liquid in the bowl, stir it down, then turn it out of the bowl. Line the bowl with a well-floured cloth and dump the dough blob back in. Leave it again for an hour or until pretty well risen.

Now preheat the oven at 475F with the empty Dutch oven inside. When it's good and hot, carefully pull out the Dutch oven and dump the dough into it from the floured cloth. Put the hot lid back on, put it back in the oven, turn down the oven to 350F, and bake till done. The timing varies with the size of your batch and the size of the Dutch oven. You can tell when it's done by turning the loaf out and rapping on the bottom with your knuckles. Basically, it should sound dry through, not doughy inside.

This bread is very impressive. I'd recommend it if you're going to have guests for dinner.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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Rebecca Norman wrote:My sister showed me how to make crusty no-knead sourdough in a Dutch oven. It comes out like a gorgeous loaf from a brick oven, all crusty on the outside, and big holes and soft texture on the inside.

Just mix a fairly wet sticky dough of flour, water, and just a little yeast or sourdough starter (less yeast than your normal bread recipe). Just mix it up but don't knead it, and leave it too sticky to knead, anyway. Leave it on the shelf for several hours or overnight. When it has fully risen and looks like a big bubbly liquid in the bowl, stir it down, then turn it out of the bowl. Line the bowl with a well-floured cloth and dump the dough blob back in. Leave it again for an hour or until pretty well risen.

Now preheat the oven at 475F with the empty Dutch oven inside. When it's good and hot, carefully pull out the Dutch oven and dump the dough into it from the floured cloth. Put the hot lid back on, put it back in the oven, turn down the oven to 350F, and bake till done. The timing varies with the size of your batch and the size of the Dutch oven. You can tell when it's done by turning the loaf out and rapping on the bottom with your knuckles. Basically, it should sound dry through, not doughy inside.

This bread is very impressive. I'd recommend it if you're going to have guests for dinner.


I've been seeing this idea around. I have to try it!
 
Cassie Langstraat
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elle sagenev wrote:Beef Bourginoun and Carnitas. To die for!  French onion soup too!


I am making beef bourginoun tonight!
 
Marco Banks
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Chili Verde.

Ingredients:
A big-ass pork roast
15 (or so) tomatillos
2 serrano chilis.  More if you like it hotter.  Other chilies are fine as well, but I grow serranos and I love the taste better than jalapenos. 
1 or 2 big white onions
2 or 3 cups of water
Salt to taste.

Purchase a big pork roast --- 4 lbs or so.  If there is a thick fat cap on one side of it, that's good.

Begin to brown the roast in the dutch oven, starting with the fat side down.  Put it on low and slowly render that fat until you get a nice coating of oil on the bottom of the pot.  I usually render it for at least 20 minutes.  Once you've got enough fat in the bottom, pull the roast out and set it on a cutting board.  Cut the roast into 2-3 inch chunks. 

Turn the heat up to medium.  Brown those chunks in the dutch oven, a couple at a time.  Give it time and get a nice dark sear on all sides of the pork chunks. 

While the meat is browning, chop up the onions into biggish pieces -- no need to be too fancy with this.

Peel the husk off your tomatillos and cut them into quarters.

Chop the chilies up -- not too fine -- no need to work that hard.

Once the meat chunks are all nicely browned, return all the meat into the pot, along with the onions, tomatillos, and serrano peppers.  Add a healthy dose of salt ---- pork always needs lots of salt.  Add enough water to the pot so that the meat will braise, but not all the way up until it covers the meat. 

Put the pot in a low oven (250 or so) and let it bake for 3 hours.

Serve it any way you want: burritos, tacos, over rice, tostadas, with eggs for breakfast  . . . however you wish to serve it.   If you make homemade flour tortillas, I'm coming over for dinner.  NOTHING better than tender chile verde with a thick, warm homemade tortilla.

The stock that is left in the pot after you're done is amazing.  Use it for soup or whatever.  All those tomatillos make it bright and slightly tart, while the onions make it sweet and rich.
 
Victor Johanson
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Do it...I always scoffed at the notion of no-knead bread, until I made some of the dutch oven variety. I used the recipe here:

http://www.myhealthyeatinghabits.com/2012/03/21/my-favorite-no-knead-whole-wheat-bread/

...except I used fresh ground wheat and only sourdough for leavening. Takes about 5 minutes of actual work.



Cassie Langstraat wrote:
Rebecca Norman wrote:My sister showed me how to make crusty no-knead sourdough in a Dutch oven. It comes out like a gorgeous loaf from a brick oven, all crusty on the outside, and big holes and soft texture on the inside.

Just mix a fairly wet sticky dough of flour, water, and just a little yeast or sourdough starter (less yeast than your normal bread recipe). Just mix it up but don't knead it, and leave it too sticky to knead, anyway. Leave it on the shelf for several hours or overnight. When it has fully risen and looks like a big bubbly liquid in the bowl, stir it down, then turn it out of the bowl. Line the bowl with a well-floured cloth and dump the dough blob back in. Leave it again for an hour or until pretty well risen.

Now preheat the oven at 475F with the empty Dutch oven inside. When it's good and hot, carefully pull out the Dutch oven and dump the dough into it from the floured cloth. Put the hot lid back on, put it back in the oven, turn down the oven to 350F, and bake till done. The timing varies with the size of your batch and the size of the Dutch oven. You can tell when it's done by turning the loaf out and rapping on the bottom with your knuckles. Basically, it should sound dry through, not doughy inside.

This bread is very impressive. I'd recommend it if you're going to have guests for dinner.


I've been seeing this idea around. I have to try it!
bread1.png
[Thumbnail for bread1.png]
bread2.png
[Thumbnail for bread2.png]
 
Kate Muller
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Pulled Pork is one of my favorites in a dutch oven.

Soak a pork shoulder or other pork roast in 1/4 cup salt, with equal parts water and apple cider vinegar overnight.  Make sure the entire roast is submerged.

Put roast in dutch oven and add the left over brine solution till only 1/2" of the roast is above the fluid. 

Add 1 tablespoon each of ground mustard seeds and cumin
2 cloves of minced garlic
1 quartered onion and one quartered apple

Put the dutch oven in the oven with the lid on set at 300 and cook till the roast is easy to shred with 2 forks.  It usually takes 3 to 5 hours depending on the size of the pork roast.


short ribs, beef stew, and pot roast are all idea dishes to make in a dutch oven.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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It was only appropriate that the VERY first thing that was cooked in my dutch oven was bacon.



Theeeennnnn it became beef bourguignon which I can not pronounce in any way, shape, or form but it tasted damn good!!!



Not exactly aesthetically pleasing, but again... It tasted damn good!
 
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