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Plant Breeding For Human Scale Farming

 
Joseph Lofthouse
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I have been paying attention this summer to traits in plants that make my life easier and harder as a human being engaged in farming. This fall, I have been consciously conducting seed saving in such a manner that I'm saving seeds from plants that make my life easier, and not saving them from seeds that make my life harder. I'm a human being. I do farming mostly by human labor. Therefore, I aughta be selecting for traits that make my life easier as a human being. I'm not a machine. I don't harvest by machine. Machines have steel parts and can simply mash, crunch, or pulverize anything that stands in the way of harvest. As a human, my fingers are delicate. The strength of my arms is about on par with the structural strength of the plants I am harvesting. The traits that make something better for machine harvesting may not apply at all to harvesting by human muscle power. So I'm starting this thread, to explore what traits I aught to be selecting to make growing and harvest easier for primates.

I'm of the opinion that every time i save seeds from any plant, I am engaged in plant breeding. Because, like it or not, I am doing inadvertent selection for traits that work best on my farm and with my habits. The machine harvesters are doing the same. I think that when we buy seeds from mechanical farms, that we are also obtaining varieties that have inadvertently been selected to be easier for machines to handle, which may make them harder for humans to deal with.

This summer I grew a flour corn. Some of the cobs were carried as high as 6 feet. That's at eye level, so it makes picking simple. Some of the cobs made me stoop over to pick them. It wasn't much of a stoop, but every bit of stooping I do is a little bit more tiredness by the end of the day, and a little bit slower to pick. So this fall when I was choosing which plants to save seeds from, I eliminated every plant that would have made me stoop to pick. Didn't matter what other traits it had. If it caused stooping, it was chicken food. I found a few cobs which were so tightly attached to the stalk that I couldn't yank them off. Another trait to eliminate from the gene pool.

Stoopers vs Joy-to-Pick




 
Su Ba
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I'm just starting to save seed, selecting for variations in varieties that suit my homestead. I really hadn't thought about this from an ergonomic angle, but that's something to take into consideration. Up until now, I have been seed saving and keeping varieties true to type in order to sell the seed the local gardeners.

Last year, without thinking much about it, I started making changes in my gardening methods to make things easier on my aging body. Like you Joseph, I do a lot of manual labor on my farm. Wide beds have gotten narrower so that they easier to straddle for harvesting. Certain crops are now in rows for easier care and harvesting .....example,  bush beans. Wide beds worked for me when I was younger, but no longer. And I'm now preferring crops that can be harvested without bending over for long periods of time.

Now that Joseph has put the idea in my head, I plan to start selecting seed from my favorite peas from plants that have longer vines. 24"-30" vines are getting to be too painful to harvest from. I'd rather use trellises and have 5' vines so that I don't have to bend over all the time for picking peas. Since I can grow 3 generations of peas a year, I suspect I could get fairly rapid results saving only seed from the tallest plants with the higher pods. We shall see. I've already grown some long vined peas this year and appreciated the difference.

I'm just starting growing my own corn, so I'll be saving seed from those pants whose ears are within easy reach. Great idea!
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Here's another example of a pair of traits that make human-scale harvest easy/hard. This time with squash. As I've been harvesting squash seeds by hand, one fruit at a time, I've noticed that some squash are super easy to harvest seeds from, and some are super hard. The easy ones have air spaces surrounding the seeds, and the placenta is stringy, so the seeds are easily extracted. Other fruits have seed cavities that are more like watermelon: Crispy, and hard to deal with. I've been culling squash with the hard-to-extract-seeds trait.

An example of seeds that are hard to harvest compared to easily harvested.


Another example: Seeds surrounded in flesh that tightly adheres, compared to seeds that are loose and easy to clean.

 
Casie Becker
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I wonder if selecting for stringy placenta to extract seed was one of the first steps that led to the development of spaghetti squash?
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Casie: Could be. I find all sorts of unintended consequences when I start selecting which plants to save seeds from. For example when I started selecting for carrots that can out-compete the weeds, I also inadvertently selected for huge roots. Sometimes certain colors are associated with better taste, so by selecting for taste, I also end up selecting for color. When I select for earliness in tomatoes, I end up inadvertently selecting for smaller fruits.
 
Ray South
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Location: Northern Tablelands, NSW, Australia
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I guess I've been saving at least some seeds to make my life easier without consciously doing so. When I thresh pulses only those that come out with the bashing they get are saved and planted the next year. I haven't been saving large numbers long enough to notice any changes but I will focus a little more on this in future.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Ray: Thanks for pointing that out. I've been making a conscious effort to select for pulses that are easily threshed by my favorite method of hitting the plant against the inside of a garbage can. I like for the beans to fall into the can, and for the pods to stay on the plant. If the pods don't break open easily, or if they fall into the can without breaking open, then I cull that plant.

I've also been unconsciously, and consciously, selecting for wheat and rye that are easily threshed with human muscle-power.
 
Tracy Wandling
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Brilliant! Another thing to add to the list of desirable plant attributes. I've been thinking of trying out a few different quinoa and amaranth seeds, and to find ones that are the easiest to thresh. But now I'm thinking that I might be able to select for that attribute. That would be fabulous! And the peas and beans, too. Great thoughts.

In this vein, I will also be looking for/selecting for greens with upright growth habits, to keep the leaves cleaner, as well as making harvesting easier. And I hope to grow/select for onions, green onions, and leeks that grow well in bunches, as I read about in one of Eliot Coleman’s books. I like the idea of being able to pull up green onions in one bunch, ready to tie up for market. I also like the fact that planting 3 or 4 onion seeds into one bunch makes for FAR fewer transplants. Same with leeks. I tried it this summer and it worked pretty well. Looking forward to doing it more next year, and trying out some different varieties.

I’ll definitely be thinking more about this idea of selecting/breeding for ease of harvesting. I like the idea that I can fine tune my vegetable varieties to make my market garden more productive and time-wise. Thanks for putting more good ideas into my head!
 
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