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Quick apple tree question.

 
Randy Bucher
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I have bench grafted my apple trees , set them in sphagnum moss to callus over on the back porch , ( 7 days now has passed )   The buds are starting to grow/push on a few of the scion but the weather is being crazy - It is supposed to drop down into the mid 20's at night for the next 5 days ( highs being in the mid 40's ).

My question is: 1 - plant them in the 3 gallon containers and put them under a carport or will the weather hurt them ?
                      2 - Plant them in the containers and put them into a non heated building until the weather warm up above freezing ?
                      3 - Just hold off till the weather has broken then plant them in the containers ?
I live in NC
                        I updated with some photos
Apple-tree-pic1.jpg
Bench grafted apple trees soaing in a bucket
Apple-tree-pic-3.jpg
[Thumbnail for Apple-tree-pic-3.jpg]
Apple-Tree-pic-2.jpg
Bench grafted apple trees heeled in ready to plant
 
Michael Newby
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Hi Randy, I personally would go with option 2.  That should start to acclimatize them while protecting the new buds from freezing. 

Let us know how it goes and post pics if you can, we love pictures of things growing around here.
 
Marco Banks
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If they've broken dormancy and are budding, I don't think you want them to get shocked with a freeze.  Newly grafted trees are using much of their energy to heal the graft.  Shocking them with a freeze would be pretty hard on them.
 
chip sanft
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Option 4: Plant them in containers you can move and shift them into the kitchen or something for the below freezing nights? This warm spell followed by a cold snap is going to wreck havoc here in the Southeast and I sure wish we could move our fig tree inside...
 
John Saltveit
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I would leave them semi protected until Spring really hits, then plant them in the ground.
JOhn S
PDX OR
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Wow, nice grafts I just have to say that first.
Since the buds are pushing you definitely don't want bud frost or freeze that would be a disaster at this point for the new grafts.
Option 2 is fine as long as there can be enough warm air so they don't freeze just from air temp or wind burn.
They can do just fine as they are as long as you keep them damp and happy for at least another two weeks maybe even a month.

Now that we have those options explained, I will tell you what I would do.
You can temp. pot those up in sleeves, if you have some or can acquire plastic sleeve material (can be usually found at a package shipping store, they use it to make those inflated shock adsorbing bubbles).
That way you can give them soil to grow in (or even more sphagnum moss) and let their roots grow without danger of root tangles when you are ready to plant them out.

Redhawk
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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