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Bench grafting question

 
Randy Bucher
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Going to bench graft some apple trees with EMLA 111 and EMLA 7 rootstock.  I am going to be planting them in 3 gallon round containers. 
Going to try and build some shelves for them to sit on for the 2 weeks healing period in which I can keep the temp right for them and need to figure out the spacing between shelves.



My question is: if the container is 11 inches high,  what will the height of the final graft be -  rootstock + scion + container =  ?
( how far will the rootstock and scion stick out of the container )


Thank You
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Grafts always should be above soil level. Most are around 3-4 inches above the soil level of the root stock.

Scion length is indeterminate. That usually depends on the length of the scion stock, which will most likely vary piece to piece.

container height + root stock height + scion length = grafted tree height, add to that at least 4 inches for first leaf growth and any extra measurement needed if you are going to use grow lights for stimulation of growth.


Redhawk
 
John Saltveit
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Many times bench grafters are urged to use no more than 3 buds so you don't overwhelm the energy of the tiny rootstock. That usually comes out to about 4-5 inches.
John S
PDX OR
 
Steve Sherman
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You may find it easier to put the newly grafted bare root trees in cold/cool storage for a month before potting them. I have generally done that with my bench grafts. I make the grafts, re-wrap the roots in moist newspaper or the like. wrap the bundle in plastic (usually the same plastic the root stock was shipped in), put in a box to eliminate undue movement, and put the box in a corner of my root cellar. The 35-40F temp there is fairly good at letting the graft heal over. Last year I had 93% take using this with apples. Note that these temps are probably not ideal for stone fruit grafts.

The main advantages are: the new trees take a lot less space this way, at least for a while, and you avoid the handling of plants until the graft has had a chance to heal.

 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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