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cloth from kudzu

 
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Kill kudzu and make money from it.  How cool is that?  Kudzu is not just a food and medicine plant, it's also a great source of clothing.  

Alas, kudzu doesn't grow where I live, so I can't play with it.  Even if I could grow it, it's on the 'invasive list' so I'm not supposed to.  But I'm posting this in hope that someone here might be inspired and try making kudzu cloth.  

The Book of Kudzu: A Culinary & Healing Guide
By William Shurtleff, Akiko Aoyagi




Chapter 5 is all about harvesting, processing and weaving with kudzu fibre.  

With luck, the book preview will show up here.  If I did it right, I don't know how long it will last.  So grab the information while you can and get out there and transform this invasive species into a cottage industry.  

If kudzu is half as invasive as they say, then for some readers out there, money really does grow on trees vines.
 
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I was seriously surprised to find another use for kudzu. Chewing Tabacco. We have a company here in AB that sells herbal chew and main ingredient apparently is kudzu. Weeds for the win!
 
r ranson
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Seeking participants for a kudzu project.

If anyone is interested in taking this to the next level, let me know.  All you need is a dream, the enthusiasm to see it through, a willingness to learn and an eagerness try new things.  I can provide free online mentoring and classes in the skills you need (over a thousand dollars worth of value) but you would have to do the work because I have no kudzu.  

What you get out of it, knowledge and skill necessary to transform kudzu into cloth and a start towards your own cottage industry.

What I get out of it, proof that it can be done and a sample of the kudzu yarn you made.

I would like a group of 4 to 10 people.  Once we have this I can set up a private forum where we can work.  
I anticipate it will take one to two years to get your skills up to the level where you can sell your product.  

 
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I am interested in this, but I won't be able to devote much time before late July.

I researched this a bit last year and came accross the following...
Harvest lengths of green vine, boil for an hour. Place boiled vine under a pile of leaves to ferment. I don't remember how long was recommended. (Source lost) Below source says to place in pampas.

Clean fermented vine in river.

Make thread...




Just in case you had not run accross this site in your research. Author was teaching how to do this stuff. The last info posted was in 2014 though.
Advertisement for 2014 kudzu workshop in Georgia.
http://www.kudzuweaving.com/
overview of processing
http://www.kudzuweaving.com/p/about-kudzu-fiber.html
Recommended reading list is on this site as well.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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Joylynn Hardesty wrote:Harvest lengths of green vine, boil for an hour.


This meant to use current years' growth.

Our killing frosts don't occur until mid October, so I would still have time to work on this in the current year.
 
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Hello everyone, my first post here but a long time luker    

I would be interested also but I'm in the West where Kudzu doesn't grow.  I'm a spinner and
beginning knitter....and its probably time for me to learn to work with the vegie fibers.
 
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raven ranson wrote:Seeking participants for a kudzu project.

If anyone is interested in taking this to the next level, let me know.  All you need is a dream, the enthusiasm to see it through, a willingness to learn and an eagerness try new things.  I can provide free online mentoring and classes in the skills you need (over a thousand dollars worth of value) but you would have to do the work because I have no kudzu.  

I'm interested. I live in kudzu country, NC, zone 7b. But i'd like to find some kudzu that has not been sprayed. I'll ask around.

 
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Hi Raven,

If Kudzu vines can be used, could that same sort of process be used with English Ivy Vines?  I've got a definite surplus of those and they're adding too much wind load to our large trees. I've had past experience with weaving, but not spinning or fiber preparation.

We're not fenced, so I can't use goats to help me get on top of the problem and the people I've spoken to insist that the only thing to do with the pulled out material is to burn it (and they haven't really given me a satisfactory explanation of *why* that's the only thing to do).

J.
 
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Location: burke county nc
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funny enough i have been cutting green kudzu vine off the front of my land (near hickory nc) lately to do just this.... not sure how the book says to process the fiber but i have a good hunch that i know how to make high quality fiber much quicker than the hand peel method... gonna get these vines retted and put up to dry for when i have more time to process them later in the year... need to build some simple equipment anyhow and pick up my spinning wheel from my folks place in new york before i can do much  
 
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How do you get the kudzu book?  All of the book store links say product not found.

Karen
 
r ranson
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Karen Ruff wrote:How do you get the kudzu book?  All of the book store links say product not found.

Karen



Google books has it free to read online right now.  I'm not sure about the print copy.  Maybe abebooks https://www.abebooks.com ?
 
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