• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Mike Haasl
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Rob Lineberger
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Ash Jackson
  • Jordan Holland

Pine Sap to Pine Tar to Pine Resin - glues and many sticky uses

 
Mother Tree
Posts: 11657
Location: Portugal
2282
dog duck forest garden tiny house books wofati bike bee solar rocket stoves greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I found this video that shows an old pine resin processing factory and then a trip to the woods to collect resin, followed by picnic in true Portuguese style.

Enjoy!

 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 11657
Location: Portugal
2282
dog duck forest garden tiny house books wofati bike bee solar rocket stoves greening the desert
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here's another video about the pine resin industry in France, using Maritime Pine, or Pinus pinaster, which is the one that grows all over the place where I live in Portugal.

This video is more educational, and in English.



Has anyone tried collecting pine resin?  And if so, how did you process it?  And what did you use it for?

I'm tempted to experiment with collecting it but I'm not yet sure what use I'd have for it.

 
Posts: 7693
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1508
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
No first hand knowledge but I'm in fiddle country here and there are plenty of fiddlers who 'rosin the bow' with a rosin made from pine resin as in this article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosin
I see many uses I didn't know of in the article once the pine resin is changed to rosin:

Rosin is an ingredient in printing inks, photocopying and laser printing paper, varnishes, adhesives (glues), soap, paper sizing, soda, soldering fluxes, and sealing wax.
Rosin can be used as a glazing agent in medicines and chewing gum. It is denoted by E number E915. A related glycerol ester (E445) can be used as an emulsifier in soft drinks. In pharmaceuticals, rosin forms an ingredient in several plasters and ointments.




 
pollinator
Posts: 4958
1154
transportation duck trees rabbit tiny house chicken earthworks building woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here resin comes mostly from Fir as it is a natural epoxy that is absolutely clear. In world war two it was collected for optics for bomb sights.

The University of Maine is also finding new uses for resin in wood and has derived a type of gasoline from it that could power cars in the future.
 
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm a clinical and community herbalist and have harvested only the resin that is the easiest to remove, and only what I've find, I've never scarred a tree to extract more. What I do is heat a glass bowl in double boiler (a bowl who's use will forever be resin) and usually never bother to remove impurities; although I would put it through a strainer if it was used in salve or something. Mostly it is burned as an inhalant (which could be considered ironic) to help lungs recover from inhaling smoke or extremely hot air, above all it heals physical trauma. Liniments or salves work great for abrasions or deep wounds, if the "solids" are taken out.
 
Posts: 9002
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
670
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think for your average novice, the most likely place where you will find resin useful is in treating minor wounds on pets or livestock. It has disinfectant properties and is not highly palatable to  most animals, so they won't lick it all off.

I'm sure that there are furniture finishes based on resin. The makers of these often keep their formulas secret.
 
Posts: 84
Location: Portugal
2
tiny house solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
by destillation you separate pine resin into two componants: colophonium and turpentine.

Turpentine is a solvent that has many uses, colophonium can be used to clean metals to tin solder them.

took the time to pick this one for you

 
gardener
Posts: 6686
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1337
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
pine resin has many uses including; sealant, glue, fire starter(fat wood), wood finish component(violin varnish ingredient), sticky powder(pitcher's rosin bag) or block (bow rosin) along with many more uses as an ingredient.

If you want to collect it as pure as you can get it, you have to scar the bark of the pine tree and place a clean piece of either metal or slate type rock at the bottom of the bark scar.
I use a heavy blade knife and mallet to make the scar through the cambium layer, the scar will be around 12 inches long, top to bottom.
I like to use aluminum sheeting for this purpose or even better is aluminum foil, it is easier to shape a bowl with a "run in" front piece, I then fasten this to the tree with twine.
The resin comes out of the tree wound and flows onto the aluminum run in and down into the connected bowl shape for easy gathering, I will do up to 4 scars on a tree that is larger than 8" diameter normally in the spring time (similar to collecting sugar maple sap).

Processing method is determined by the intended use, many times I dissolve the raw resin in moonshine then filter it before distilling or evaporating. (to make violin varnish or rosin blocks)
If I wanted to seal a birch bark canoe I would cook the raw resin in a stone bowl, adding ashes to it as it cooked, then put it on the seams while still hot enough to be liquid. (today there are better lasting products but a true, traditional canoe would be sealed this way)
To make a violin bow rosin block you dissolve, filter, pour into mold and evaporate. For this use I dissolve all the resin the moonshine will hold so it is a supersaturated solution then filter that into the molds.  
This same method is used to make a baseball rosin bag except you crush the dried rosin to powder and pour that into a bag that you sew up after filling.

My violin/ guitar varnish formula is a secret but some of the components are dissolved pine resin, bee propolis and powdered copper along with a few other ingredients.

Redhawk
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 11657
Location: Portugal
2282
dog duck forest garden tiny house books wofati bike bee solar rocket stoves greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Life of a Resin Collector

 
João Carneiro
Posts: 84
Location: Portugal
2
tiny house solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
very nice burra, thanks for sharing.
 
Every snowflake is perfect and unique. And every snowflake contains a very tiny ad.
Rocket Mass Heater Plans - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/7/rmhplans
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic