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Please help me identify this small tree  RSS feed

 
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This is a small tree growing in WV at the edge of the woods.  The berries don't look like the Serviceberry pictures that I have seen online.  Anyone know what it is?  I am hoping of course that it is edible.  It is August and the berries are still green.
mysterytree.jpg
[Thumbnail for mysterytree.jpg]
 
garden master
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I'm not sure what it is but it definitely isn't a serviceberry.  See if your library has a foraging or berry identification book and see if you can narrow it down.  Good luck!
 
pollinator
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Location: Sask, Canada - Zone 3b
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Unless the picture is casting some illusions, that's way too big to be serviceberries - even the big ones they grow in orchards are only half that size. ServiceBerries are also known as JuneBerries, and around here they just finished producing for the year.

If I had to guess, it might be a plum - the oval-shape reminds me of them anyways. Again, that's purely a guess. If you could dissect one it would be easier to identify
 
Mike Jay
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Serviceberries have a crown on the bottom like a blueberry or apple.  These don't appear to have that.  My berry book only covers stuff that grows in my region but in quickly looking through it the closest thing I find is a Wild Raisin (which would be edible).  But I'd highly suggest getting a book that covers your area to figure it out.
 
gardener
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Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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Maybe nannyberry? I can't tell if your leaves are serrated or smooth. The stems, or panicles are somewhat obstructed as well. Compare to the link carefully. Never "make" a plant fit an identification. Tummy aches or worse could happen if you do. On that happy note, I wish you fortune in your foraging adventures!

http://minnesotaseasons.com/Plants/nannyberry.html

 
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If you have a county extension office, take a sample (branch at least 6" long not counting leaves, and fruit on branch too) in to them. If they don't know they can certainly find out. Pick it fresh when you take it in. Get a good picture or two of the main trunk as well for bark comparison. And another to show how the branches, branch.
 
pollinator
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a picture of the ripe berrys would be good too I must admit looks plumish to me
 
Kurri Kline
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Yeah!! Someone identified it on another site, it is Viburnum.  The Blackhaw Viburnum - Viburnum prunifolium.  Apparently when the fruit is dark blue/black and softens it is edible and tasks like small sweet prunes with a flattened seed inside.  It has pretty white flowers in the spring.  That is all that I know, but I am very happy that it is edible.
 
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