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Oil for deck  RSS feed

 
Jane Southall
Posts: 85
Location: Limestone, TN
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What is the best natural oil for waterproofing a deck, on a budget?  Thanks.
 
Sebastian Köln
Posts: 97
Location: Germany · Schleswig-Holstein · Eutin
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You could give linseed oil a try (with some pigment, to protect the oil from UV light).
Raw linseed oil is great to use, but takes some time to dry (less than 2 weeks if painted thin).

"boiled" linseed oil contains catalysts to speed up drying, but may cause skin irritation. It also gives you less time to work.
 
Jane Southall
Posts: 85
Location: Limestone, TN
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Linseed is what I was strongly considering.  Yet, had read mildew may be a problem in wet climate, which we have.  So, was uncertain.  Thank you.  Did not know about the pigment/UV situation.
 
James Freyr
Posts: 290
Location: Middle Tennessee
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Tung oil is another alternative. I know it can be used for things like wooden cutting boards, but like any cutting board with washing and use it requires reapplication depending on the amount of use it gets. Perhaps it may work for you, but I'm not sure about mildew or how often it would need reapplication with regular rain.
 
Jane Southall
Posts: 85
Location: Limestone, TN
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I looked up tung.  Pretty heavy duty.  Needs a pigment as well.  But I found canola oil and vinegar apparently no pigment needed.  Also soy is a possibility.  Haven't researched yet.  Thank you.
 
Brett Thibault
Posts: 3
Location: Southern Worcester County
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Hi Jane,

If there's a good stand of birch on your homestead, I recommend rendered birch oil as an exterior wood preservative.  I coated the 1X6 reclaimed yellow pine esterior decking boards I have before I installed them, and have reapplied the oil every other year for 18 years; the wood is well preserved and has a wonderful honey color.  After application, it will remain tacky for two or three days depending on temperature and humidity conditions. I always apply the oil in October or November here in Massachusetts, and it takes two days to cure.  Birch oil extraction is sustainable and easy. Water beads up on birch oil, and it has a marvelous fragrance.  I also use it to waterproof leather goods and canvas tarps.  There are many articles and videos on how to extract and render the oil from different parts of the tree, but I always use the bark.  There are also several informational resources online regarding sustainable birch bark harvesting.
 
Jane Southall
Posts: 85
Location: Limestone, TN
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Actually there is a large river birch beside the deck.  I am right now cutting english ivy off of it, again.  Frustrated cuz I love this tree and I can't keep the ivy off.  But that's a different topic.  I love birch and love the idea of the oil.  Yet, I don't think this one tree would be sufficient.  Thank you, Brett.  will research this.  interesting.
 
Jane Southall
Posts: 85
Location: Limestone, TN
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Cody DeBaun
Posts: 74
Location: Denton, TX United States Zone 8a
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Neat! I wonder if that method for rendering birch oil could be retrofitted to a jolly rogers RMH? I've wondered the same thing about making Sepp's bone sauce that way. Seems like a good use of the extra barrel while still converting some of your fuel source to biochar...
 
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