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Buffaloberries....help!

 
master gardener
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I just got back from visiting friends in North Dakota and we took a day trip to Theodore Roosevelt National Park.  We drove past a lot of buffaloberry bushes that were red with fruit, but I couldn't get out of the car in those areas to grab some seeds or cuttings.  Does anyone know if there are better selections of buffaloberries available.  I'm hoping for great yields of red berries, perhaps a few orange ones too.  This article calls them the next super fruit....being a pretty nitrogen fixer makes me agree.  I really liked the flavor

https://www.businessinsider.com/buffaloberry-is-the-new-superfruit-2013-11


 
Greg Martin
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If there aren't nurseries with heavy bearing selections that anyone knows of, do you live in buffaloberry territory can I convince you to send me some seeds from a heavy bearing plant?  I'm happy to pay for the seeds.  I would really like to grow out a bunch of them to select for heavy bearing plants.  I'm looking to add some more nitrogen fixing fruit makers in my forest garden.
 
Greg Martin
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Martin Crawford wrote this article about buffaloberry that I thought people here might find interesting:
https://www.permaculture.co.uk/why-you-should-grow-buffalo-berry-shepherdia-argentea

Because of it I wrote to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to see if they're moving forward with releasing selections.  I'll let you guys know what I find out in case others are interested as well.
 
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Buffalo berries are awesome the bushes are nitrogen fixes but super spiky though. I'm harvesting some this week actually both for the berries and seed for myself, I'm in Saskatchewan Canada while it is legal to send seeds shipping might be expensive. I have no idea if there are improved varieties or not (doubt it).
 
Greg Martin
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Hi Marc.  I'm sending you a Purple Mooseage!
 
pollinator
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Location: Central Indiana
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I would be very interested in some buffaloberry seeds if someone in the US happened to be able to get some.
 
pollinator
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Location: Sask, Canada - Zone 3b
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Hawthorn and Buffaloberries are the only shrub that consistently puts out fruit every year here. I will disagree with the article though, in that if it's been a dry year and the water content isn't good, the berries are not "high enough in sugar to eat fresh" - one will make a face like they took a bite out of a lemon in that scenario. Still good for other things like jam though.

Something that should be noted is that they take a long time to grow. The one in my yard has maybe put on 1 or 2 feet in 5 years, but then again that's without any tending to it.

As for being the next superfood, I'm not certain of that because of similar issues with seaberries which is that they are difficult to harvest.

---

I'll see if I can snap a pic today of a few on the side of the road. My guesstimate is that the 6-7 foot tall ones have about 1-1.5 gallons of fruit on them on average.

I could probably send some seeds aswell, but I'd have to look into how international shipping works with seeds.

 
pollinator
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Our conservation district sells them in it's wind break selection.

They are great for pollinators as well being the first bloomer in our area.
 
Jonathan Ward
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How much do they cost?  Do they sell them online?
 
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Location: Northern pennsylvania, zone 5b
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Are Buffalo berries dispersive?  And how do they respond to pruning?  Anyone have a preference between Shepherdia argentea and Sheperdia canadensis?  
 
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