• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Can you get pesticides out of beeswax?

 
Posts: 2
Location: Hawaii
bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My friend and I want to make lip balm and lotions with beeswax and we are concerned about pesticides in our wax, I was wondering if there is a way to clean the wax of pesticides somehow?
 
pollinator
Posts: 2409
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
151
forest garden solar
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you melt the wax and mix it with water, the water soluble pesticide will be left in the water once the wax freezes at room temperature. One should be able to melt the wax just by pouring boiling water on it.

Do you ingest the honey from these beehives?
 
Mana Manfredi
Posts: 2
Location: Hawaii
bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes we do from our domesticated hives, but we also do bee removes and we want to use the wild wax and honey for external products(lip balm,lotions,etc..).

Thank you for your info.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2283
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
179
books composting toilet bee rocket stoves wood heat homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm going to disagree with the comment above. The pesticides that end up in wax are not water soluble in the first place (if they were the would not dissolve in wax).

Some studies have shown that pesticides can collect in wax, but the levels are low compared to other sources we are commonly exposed to. The exception is from managed hives where miticides are used and the wax comes into direct contact with the pesticides. Thus you are more likely to have higher pesticide contamination in your managed (treated)  hives than in wax from wild colonies.
 
S Bengi
pollinator
Posts: 2409
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
151
forest garden solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ethanol could also be used as a solvent dissolving both, organic and polar compound.
The next step would be acetone, but nobody really want to go there.
 
pollinator
Posts: 213
Location: nevada zone7
53
kids cat tiny house books chicken fiber arts homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
if you melt the wax and boil it (burn off), how clean would it be then?
 
gardener
Posts: 1336
Location: mountains of Tennessee
405
cattle chicken bee homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think once the wax contains pesticides there's not much that can be realistically done to remove them. The darker the wax the older so use the lightest wax possible. Virgin wax (recently built but no eggs, honey, or pollen stored in it yet) would be best. That's my 2 cents worth.
 
Posts: 170
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
chemicals in beeswax is nothing compared to trip though fresh fruit and veggies covered with lanate and alar at a super walmart.
bees are smart, they will avoid chemical laden fields and find wild nectar in the environment if they can
 
Mother Tree
Posts: 11067
Location: Portugal
1703
dog duck forest garden tiny house books wofati bike bee solar rocket stoves greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Unless the bees are kept organically, it's likely that they will have been exposed to varroa treatments, which I guess will at least partly end up in the wax.

If I was buying beeswax for cosmetic purposes, I'd be looking to source it from organically kept bees.
 
rubbery bacon. rubbery tiny ad:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!