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Has anyone ever ran the black pipe like this
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gardener
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Hi Ben; Welcome to Permies !

No, sorry but that will collect creosote and most likely drip black yucky stuff.
Go up on an angle with swivel adj. 90 's,  
 
Benjamin Dubbs
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How about from the 90 to the wall it's a full peice I wanted over kill to keep away from my logs.i should angel that as well
 
thomas rubino
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Well , I would recommend it. But just removing the first horizontal will help bunches.

With a hand held temp gun you could monitor the wood and if it was getting too hot use a sheet metal shield spaced from the logs.

Your logs look super by the way.
 
Benjamin Dubbs
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I will try what you said. I have been burning this stove for 4 years now and this is the first I have had any problems probably to do with how far away from the wall I set it. But we did get a heat deflector that is what's leaning behind the stove it helped more than I thought it would. Thank you on the log we did that this summer could see the point in hiding 200+ year old craftsmanship anymore thank you for the help
 
gardener
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What does the pipe do once it goes through the wall?  

Assuming you have good draft, I'm not sure that short bit of horizontal adds that much badness to the horizontal that is already going through the wall.  I'd imagine the extra 90 is the main problem.  So if you can go from vertical to a 45 that takes you over to the left to the existing 90, you eliminate the horizontal bit but (perhaps more importantly?) you go from two 90s to one 90 and a 45.
 
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Location: Rural Unincorporated Los Angeles County
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Hey Bemjamin, what's directly above your stove through the ceiling between the wood?
We ran ours straight up and out the top of the roof.



 
Benjamin Dubbs
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When the pipe goes in the wall it goes outside and stright to the peak. Draft seems to be good it sucked a Walmart bag out of my hands when we installed it. As far as what's above the stove well that would be my bed
 
pollinator
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It really should go straight up and exit the house through the chimney, and not out through wall.

It does not surprise me that the draft was good when you installed it, but what about on damp or foggy days?

The problem with using single wall pipe exiting out through a wall and then up is, as soon as the smoke exits the house, the single wall pipe allows the smoke to start cooling. This does two things, reduces draft and produces creosote. neither you want, and the latter at the worst possible point, close to the wall where it can catch fire. I suspect that 200 year old logs (though beautiful) is also very dry.

...
The orginal stovepipe layout is questionable. If the verticle riser is angled instead of perfectly plumb, and there will not be a fire hazard/draft reduction in the chimney.
 
Mike Jay
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From what I've read, having the chimney inside is much preferred to running it up the outside of the house.  But if there's a bedroom above, that kind of limits the choices  Unless a chase can be built around the pipe or if the heat off the chimney can be useful to heat the bedroom.

Is the exterior chimney pipe single wall or insulated (double/triple wall)?  There is often a challenge with maintaining a good draft with exterior chimneys.  With the chimney inside, the heat of the house keeps it warm so air wants to rise up it.  With the pipe outside it's chilled by the outside air so it's harder to get the air to rise when starting a fire.  Foggy and damp days could be a bigger problem, as could weird wind directions causing down drafts or atmospheric pressure changes.  
 
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I have been burning this stove for 4 years now and this is the first I have had any problems



What has changed?
A new building close enough to disturb airflow?  Nearby trees grown taller than the chimney?  New batch of wood that isn't quite dry?

As for inside, a pair of 45's would smooth the transitions in direction as best you can to get through the wall.
Outside, if there's something creating a downdraft like a new building nearby you might try extending the chimney.
If you burn slow fires and it's a single wall chimney you could try a shroud around the outside chimney to retain some of the heat, keep the wind from cooling it off too much.... careful how much weight you're adding.
 
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Those elbows can be swivelled to make any angle desired but someone used them like they were all 90 degree elbows. Maybe for aesthetic reasons?

A more free flowing way would be an elbow right on top of the stove making about a 15 degree angle back and to the left. Then another elbow that would be about 75 degrees to make the turn to horizontal. That horizontal section should be as short as possible so that first up pipe should tilt back to be close to the wall.(at which point you may need a heat shield between it and the wall) Then outside the wall, put a tee with a two foot drop down and then your upwards pipe. Cap the drop down and that cap gets removed for cleaning out. Would need to pull the tee off to get that horizontal pipe clean really. Gotta have a tee there though as that's the first thing that will clog is that elbow at the bottom of a down pipe.

I went horizontal through a wall once and will never do it again. That section gets filled up with creosote. No way to avoid it. The particular stove I did that on had the outlet coming off the back so I didn't have much of a choice at the time. I've since cut a hole in the top and capped the hole in the back so now it goes straight up through the roof. Smack the pipe now and then and the creosote falls into the stove.

The other thing I see is that it looks like the stove was made for 8 inch pipe and someone put an adapter down to 6 inch.  maybe???

Preferable and most proper way would be 8 inch straight up through the roof and use a double wall/insulated pipe through the ceiling/roof. (or 6 inch if that reduction is part of the stove itself)

 
Greg Mamishian
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Benjamin Dubbs wrote:When the pipe goes in the wall it goes outside and stright to the peak. Draft seems to be good it sucked a Walmart bag out of my hands when we installed it. As far as what's above the stove well that would be my bed



Ok... guess that plan is out. (lol)

Our approach was to keep as much of the flue inside the house to recover more heat from it. It's helped us to be able to heat the house with a tiny stove.
 
Benjamin Dubbs
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Ok sorry for not replying farm comes first. So the stove came with a odd size hole for the pipe technically it should be a 8" but nothing would fit it. When I went to get the pipe and the wall kit 8" was out of stock and not sure when they could get with more money for a s/o they had 6" (Triple wall) it was cheaper and it was there so we made a phone call to a old friend he said it will work just reduce it off the stove. So for a couple weeks or months in between farming and work I installed a little at a time. I wanted something different on the inside something you don't see all the time he said we can make something work. And he couldn't help me finish anymore. So I made a simple plan I couldn't go straight into the wall the smart way had to stay over bc of the oil furnace chimney that's why it is the way it is. Originally i had it 20" from the wall for 4 years burned great it did puff every once in a while but nothing to worry about. This summer I removed the horse hair plaster and did the logs. so we moved it out made it about 30" in the picture the pipe from stove to  the first elbow in blue stayed the same the second elbow distance from the wall is the same and the side of the stove to the was is the same. In red I added 24" pipe to get me away from the log. No change outside. I seen pic of old shops running them from the  stove to across the ceiling then up stairs and out side So I'm thinking I just need to angle things a try to come  up with a  little better plan. Sorry for going on and on but in a nut shell that's what I have going on. Bit with y'all's input I will finger this out. Thank you for the help
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Mike Jay
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Thanks Benjamin, that makes it a bit clearer.  So it worked fine before and the only thing you changed was going from 15-24" and you can't un-do that.  Then I think the solution it likely to get rid of the short horizontal run in the hopes that it makes up for the 9 extra inches of horizontal that were added.  At least that's the best I can figure.  
 
Greg Mamishian
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Starting from the top of your stove, I'd shorten the vertical pipe a couple of inches (I know it's a pain to cut, or get an adjustable telescoping piece of 6 inch) so the horizontal run will slightly slant upwards.

The 90's are adjustable so I'd rotate the first one so that it's slightly more than 90 to accomodate the slight upward slant in the horizontal run.

Then I'd rotate the whole vertical section on the stove with the more than 90 to point diagonally towards the wall exit. Then I'd take the second ninety and rotate the pieces to make whatever larger than 90 angle it takes to match the diagonal run, and install that 90 as close to the wall as possible.

Then put whatever length of straight pipe it takes to connect the two adjusted 90's together.

The net result would be to eliminate the 90 in the middle of the horizontal run and to make the horizontal run slant slightly upwards.

That should work fine. Those 90's are an amazing old fashioned design. you can generate absolutely any angle with them. I even made a short straight piece out of a 90.

 
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