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I wanted to make this thread to help me keep track of and document my grape vines.

Hopefully it can be helpful to others also!
COMMENTS:
 
garden master
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I love the colors on this new shoot from one of my grape vines this spring!

It's so cool to me, with some types of grapes, how the vine looks completely dead, and this colorful burst of new life comes out from it!
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Pink new growth on the grape vine
 
Steve Thorn
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Baby grapes!

What types of table grapes are you growing?!
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Baby grapes!
 
pollinator
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Steve, have been wanting to get some grapes in, but life keeps happening and I never quite get to researching varieties, best trellis system, when to plant, etc.  Any easy references you recommend for getting started with grapes?
 
Steve Thorn
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Artie, I've really enjoyed growing grapes, and the muscadines have been almost unkillable here.

The Triumph muscadine has been my favorite by far out of the three muscadines I've grown. They have a good sweet/tart balance when fully vine ripened, and the berries turn pinkish when fully ripe.

I'm looking into getting a Fry muscadine this Fall, I've heard good things about it, and it's actually a parent of Triumph.

I prefer the taste of table grapes a little more than the muscadines, and I'm currently growing the following varieties...

Canadice
Concord Seedless
Flame
Himrod
Niagra
Pink Reliance
Reliance
Thomcord
Thompson Seedless

All of the above varieties are seedless. They were a little tougher to get established the first year. The Japanese beetles really hit them hard the first year with our very hot summers. Once they've gotten established for about a year or two though, they've really taken off and thrived, and I hope to get my first fruit from a lot of these this year.

I highly recommend planting them in the fall if you're in an area that gets pretty hot summers. I've planted some in the spring, and a few didn't make it. I think all of the ones I've planted in the Fall have survived, since they can get established a little during the winter and have better root development to get through the summer pests that first year and put on good growth.

I have really liked the design of the trellis I built, which has a double wire about 6 ft high off the ground and the wires are about 3 ft apart. One of my grapes has been trellising on a bush, which has been kind of neat, and I'm looking to go more in that direction in the future as it is much cheaper and saves a whole lot of time.

I hope to possibly have a few of the table grape vines mentioned above available for sale as early as this fall hopefully.

I plan to add a lot more pictures and videos here this year with more information on trellises, growing, and the different varieties!
 
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Steve, you must be in a pretty good zone to be able to grow both muscadine and table grapes. I have been trying to grow grapes for years. I've planted reliance, red canadice, Niagara and Concord. The only one I've had production from is the Concord, which was supposed to be seedless but has small hard seeds. The fruit is excellent though, so I don't mind the seeds. I've planted every seed I got. I've also been selecting seeds from wild grapes that have larger than usual fruits and good flavor.
 
Artie Scott
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Very helpful Steve, thank you very much. I like your Fall answer! That gives me a bit more time to plan. Can you post a pic of your trellis when you get a chance?
 
Steve Thorn
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Dan Allen wrote:Steve, you must be in a pretty good zone to be able to grow both muscadine and table grapes.



I think of my zone as a middle zone. I can grow some cooler and warmer loving plants, but usually they take some assistance to get established. It seems like each zone has its pros and cons!

I have been trying to grow grapes for years. I've planted reliance, red canadice, Niagara and Concord. The only one I've had production from is the Concord, which was supposed to be seedless but has small hard seeds. The fruit is excellent though, so I don't mind the seeds. I've planted every seed I got. I've also been selecting seeds from wild grapes that have larger than usual fruits and good flavor.



Yeah, if the fruit is good, I don't mind the seeds either!

That's awesome about planting the seeds Dan! I think that's so important to create new varieties that will be the best adapted to each of our own unique growing areas!

 
Steve Thorn
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Artie Scott wrote:Very helpful Steve, thank you very much. I like your Fall answer! That gives me a bit more time to plan. Can you post a pic of your trellis when you get a chance?



I hope to post a picture and possibly a video soon!
 
Dan Allen
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Steve, have you tried doing any grafting with grapes, like grafting cultivars onto established wild vines?
 
Steve Thorn
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No, I haven't tried that yet Dan, have you done it? It sounds like a cool idea, maybe a way to get fruit sooner possibly or to propagate more vines? I've heard table grapes are easier to graft than muscadines.

I prefer to grow the majority of my plants on their own roots if possible, but I like grafting though to test the fruit earlier for new varieties or seedlings, or to create more plants!
 
Dan Allen
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I haven't tried it, but I've been considering it as a way to propagate good grapes like you say. I'm not a huge fan of grafted plants either myself, but it's something I play around with on my seed grown trees.
 
Steve Thorn
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These are two of our table grapes. One is flowering and the other one has baby grapes forming.



Grape flowers look really neat to me. Its something you don't see a lot of or hear about often, and I didn't even know grapes flowered before I started growing them.

I love fresh home grown table grapes, and it looks like we'll be having some in a few months!

Did you know grapes have flowers?

What types of grapes are you growing? I'd love to see pictures!

 
Steve Thorn
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I grow most of my grapes on a double wire trellis about 6 ft off the ground. Here's a link to the thread discussing it in more detail.

https://permies.com/t/113730/berry/Double-top-wire-grape-trellis

And here's a video of the trellis mentioned above.

 
Steve Thorn
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Little grapes are appearing!
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Baby grapes!
 
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