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Eucalyptus Logs Mushroom Cultivation

 
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Hey. I'm from Madeira Island and I wanted to ask you guys, especially those with knowledge about the mushroom log cultivation, what you think about growing mushrooms on Eucalyptus? From what I gather through my online research, Eucalyptus kinda sucks... but that's basically the most predominant tree available here. Am I limited to Shiitake and Turkey Tail or is there any chance Eucalyptus will work with other fungi species as well? Hope to hear from you guys.
 
gardener
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I am not familiar with any mushrooms that would grow in a Eucalypt.
I am surprised that shitake and turkey tail have worked for you.
Perhaps you could email Paul Stamets?
 
João Brazão
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:I am not familiar with any mushrooms that would grow in a Eucalypt.
I am surprised that shitake and turkey tail have worked for you.
Perhaps you could email Paul Stamets?



I'll try... is paul.s@fungi.com his email address? I found it on google. Not sure if it works or not.
 
pollinator
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My son and I found an enormous fungus growing at the base of a live eucalyptus near our house back in the spring. Sorry I don't have photos, but it was yellow and I would describe it as clumpy in form, about the size of a football with 4-6 individual caps in a clump. Stalks were about 100mm and caps 150mm across. I'm pretty sure the tree is E nitens...there are a lot of them on the margin of the rugby field next door.
 
pollinator
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Chicken of the woods maybe?

RedHawk, as you have experience with break down of organic matter with fungus, how high do you think the risk of the following statement is?

Do not consume any chicken of the woods unless you harvested it from a deciduous tree. Those growing on yews, conifers or eucalyptus may absorb some of their oils which can cause serious distress.


https://www.ediblewildfood.com/chicken-of-the-woods.aspx
 
Bryant RedHawk
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good question Hans, the problem with fungi is that they do take in "noxious" particles of their food and the fruits will hold onto those "noxious" compounds.
I would imagine that if the fungi fruit was found on Eucalypts there would be a fair amount of the oil or compounds from the oil in the "mushroom" and that eating it could cause gastric distress or worse.
Same goes for Yew wood (toxic compounds) however conifers are the usual hosts for chicken of the woods so that part of the statement should be suspect. (chicken of the woods usually isn't found on deciduous trees, lion's mane is)

The reason fungi do so well at remediation of contaminated soil, water and wood is because they do take up the offending molecules the mycelium will then purge itself by putting out fruits that take those compounds away from the mycelium so it can gather more of those compounds.
This is why no one recommends eating any of the fungi fruits from a remediation bed.

Redhawk
 
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I'm not sure about eucalyptus flavor coming through. Individual fungi are quite limited in what molecules they can take up.

I have grown many oyster mushroom in quite fresh camphor laurel logs (which contains cineole, just like eucalyptus - as well as other aromatics).
There was no odd smells or tastes and an abundant harvest for years.
Oysters are not fussy about substrate.

If eucalyptus was expressed in the fungus grown, I would expect it to disappear after a few flushes.
Stamets points out the fungal proclivity for rapidly denaturing aromatics in Mycelium Running.
 
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Should be fine to grow those two on Eukalyptus just don't grow chicken of the woods -it's known to upset the stomach in some people.
 
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The mushroom spawn supplier that I ordered from recommended eucalyptus, so they haven't had problems with it. I will be trying it out soon.
 
pollinator
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Eucalyptus is a native Australian tree and Australian mushroom growers have great success growing on it. They recommend it as a growing medium, and as eucalyptus is found everywhere in Australia it’s very convenient to do so. Some taste tests done in Australia found the eucalyptus mushrooms had the best taste! In Australia we even have eucalyptus candy.
 
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Hi João, i was thinking about the same question. Did you try to grow lions mane on ecualyptus?
 
Daniel Tura
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Eukalyptus is not the best substrate for growing mushrooms. Avoid growing chicken of the woods on it
 
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I have gathered chicken of the woods, Laetiporus sulphureus, growing on blue gum eucalyptus here in Central California.  I have never had any gastric distress.  I do cook it thoroughly.
 
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does anyone know of a reliable data base of what types of edible fungi can be grown in what types of wood or trees. the info ive found googling has some of the most popular stuff and some of the info is even conflicting from one source to another. I'm surely no expert in scientific names and have very limited knowledge about mushrooms. but im pretty sure the conditions I have on a bunch of my property might just be real good for growing fungi.
 
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Bruce, here is a link showing mushroom/tree species compatibility in a chart from Field & Forest mushrooms in Wisconsin:

https://www.fieldforest.net/category/growing-outdoors#logs

I hope this chart is helpful. These folks have great spawn- I have excellent results with all their stuff. They also answer questions from newbies  if you order over the phone.

And just for the record, the F & F chart shows eucalyptus to be a satisfactory log for shiitake, but that's it.


 
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